Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am a newbie and just discovered what clip ons are. I think they're pretty bad a s s looking in general. My question is, do clip-ons effect your handling? What (besides looks) would be different from switching stock '03 620 handlebars for clip ons?
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
To amplify on that faq (which I suspect was written by someone with clip-ons)

Many mods will look cool and may even seem as comfortable in short stretches. Many riding position problems will not reveal themselves until after an entire day in the saddle, or even several consecutive days of riding.

If you're a newbie, you should ride your bike stock for a while to get used to it the way it is and to form well-informed opinions about what works for you and what you want to change. It's a bad idea to make early changes for cosmetic appeal alone -- unless you plan to use your bike as crotch jewelry rather than transportation.

I personally love the way Monsters look with clip-ons but will never add them to my bike because I have back and shoulder issues with riding on clip-ons.. what issues, you ask? Discomfort issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
T33,
you love your clip-ons, how did they affect comfort? What is your typical riding? I like the looks of clip-ons & bar end mirrors, but I'm afraid it will affect the comfort. I intend to use the bike as everyday transport, around town & city riding. I'm 5'7" and am wondering about handlebar mods, and whether clip-ons combined with rearsets would be hard on the neck & wrists, or would change the weight distribution in a positive way...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
Clips can lower the handlebar height (depending upon whether you mount them above or below the triple clamp. But, they can also adjust the angle your wrists relative to your bike and (in Cycle Cats version) adjust the angle relative to the ground. So in some cases, they may be more comfortable. That said, on the 620's, the handlebar holder is cast into the stock triple clamp, which would leave an ugly sight if you got clip-ons. You can grind them off, which some on this site have, or replace it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
796 Posts
Personally, if it was a commuter bike I would leave the handle bar. I have had bikes with both and in traffic a bar is much more comfortable than clip ons. Its a trade off, if you want an aggressive riding position to attack corners get clip ons, if you want comfort and alot of low speed leverage stay with the bars. It seems silly to put clip ons on just for looks and try to get ones that are as comfortable as bars. Alot of money just to have a look, but to each their own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
I'll mirror Ryan Akiyama (whom I have never seen post before, let alone with such sage advice).

With that said, I did eventually install a set of clip-ons. IMO you need to be way beyond beginner or newbie status to take advantage of any benefits clip-ons will give you. Only you or your local jedi master can make the call on whether you're ready for that. Their ONLY benefits lie in fast riding. I do not relish commuting on the Ducati because of them. Wrist and lower back pain are common, along with quickly numbing hands. I've gotta say here that those things were much less of an issue when I was 20, so that may be taken into account also. I'm now 33 and very healthy. Clip-ons also lower the amount of leverage you have on the front end, thus increasing steering effort. BTW, wheelies are probably easier with stock bars. ;D

The advantages are in feel, feedback, and better grip with the front end. Indeed, these are things that all Monsters based on the S4 frame (which are all Monsters made since '03) need a little help with. The pre '03 bikes were based on the older 888 style frame and I can't really comment on them except to say that they were generally regarded as being somewhat nervous. Anyway, clip-ons bring your wa more in tune with the front end's wa, making the bike more predictable and easier to ride at speed. More weight on the front means more front tire grip also. If you are already going fast or are planning to go fast (through corners) then clip-ons can be justified. And they look bad *ss. ;D
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Im ust say Cycle CAts are the bomb !!!! It made my bike feel like a totoally different monster turning !!
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
yeah clip ons do look great but a lot of work has to be done to my monster. Probably replace the entire triple and in the end is it worth it for a little better turning and a bit more back pain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Well, with all that said, I do not think I will go with clip ons. I've been riding for about 8 months. I have no beef with my current set up, just thought clip ons look cool. I think I'm just gonna buy some of those anodized black handlebars instead. Thanks for all the input everybody!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Why not just remove your stock bars, and prep and paint them black? Nice afternoon project and it'll save you a few bucks.

I do think clipons look cool, but they made my bike more comfortable for me. I'm tall (6'2") and, combined with rearsets, made my bike fit me a little better. That's obviously a personal choice. You could always find someone with clipons and see if they'll let you test ride.
Dion
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
When you're really getting in to it, and looking 100 yard ahead because looking just ahead would scare you sh1tless, and your toe is on concrete with the hard bits getting closer and your elbows are bent acute to get your chest to the tank so you know that the front end will stay put, that's when clip-ons seem like a great idea.

When you're dodging through stop and go traffic, playing the front brake like a concertina, looking for a convenient slot to tail into, or carrying a pillion, the stock bars (or even higher) are right.

The stock bars are a pretty good design considering the engineers didn't know exactly what each rider would be doing.

A good rule is to make modifications in the following order:

1) Anything government mandated or liability related that wasn't the intent of the designers, but a forced add-on (cans, intake restrictions, jetting/mix, charcoal cannisters, side stand interlocks).

2) Cosmetics that don't affect performance (paint, stickers, fender-bobbing, reflector removal).

3) Suspension mods, including bars, only after you know exactly what needs to be changed, and can describe why in your own words (not just because it's the hot ticket).

4) Engine mods, if you are racing or otherwise don't care about longevity or reliability.

-Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,095 Posts
T33,
you love your clip-ons, how did they affect comfort? What is your typical riding? I like the looks of clip-ons & bar end mirrors, but I'm afraid it will affect the comfort. I intend to use the bike as everyday transport, around town & city riding. I'm 5'7" and am wondering about handlebar mods, and whether clip-ons combined with rearsets would be hard on the neck & wrists, or would change the weight distribution in a positive way...
K, frankly I found little, if any, discomfort from the change. I would say a good compromise is buying the Cycle Cat adjustables. Otherwise, if most of your riding is in the city/commuting, be comfortable and leave the bike as is. The clip-ons I threw on my bike really help riding the twisties...but then again, I throw clip-ons on every bike I buy whether it's a city dweller or weekend warrior...it's just a great mod for the $.
Good luck.
T.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top