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If this is the case, is there any reason not to start the bike with full 'idle increase lever' (I am tempted to call it the choke, bu I think you know what I mean) if the weather is cold?

My m1000 takes a few tries in the morning in this cold weather we are having. I am still fidgeting with the lever to find the best procedure (I use, no throttle and a bit over halfway on the lever). I was just wondering if there is any downside to opening up the lever any further (other than the bike will rev quite high once started). Even if it takes the bike a couple of tries to fire up, I can't flood it right?

Any thoughts?

DUCky

I humbly aks for your forgiveness if I am making serious technical misinterpretations here. :-[
 

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The fast-idle lever only adjusts your idle once the bike is started, so setting it to the highest setting won't hurt anything.
 

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...Generally I set mine to about 90% when I start it, and then throttle back to about 60% once the bike turns over, and let the bike idle around 1500rpm to warm up. The lever is there for a reason, these bikes won't start cold without some bump to the idle
What he said.
 

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I agree, I do the same thing , in cold weather she won't start without a bump.
 

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When i start my (FI) S4, I have my left hand on the fast idle lever, so I can quickly control the idle speed to 2000-2500 or so.

If I pull it all the way, it'll jump to about 4000 or so when it starts, which isn't real friendly to a cold engine. The oil doesn't flow well when it's cold, so try to keep the idle reasonable till the engine warms up a bit.

I've never started the bike below about 35 degF though, so I don't know how it behaves below that. I do know that when it's that cold, it really doesn't want to start.
 

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On both the 97 carbureted Monster and the 98 fuel injected ST2, I put the lever full on, get is started, then adjust the idle speed back down. On the Monster, I went back down to about 2000, since it wouldn't stay at 1500 by itself. On the ST2 I adjust it closer to 1500 once it starts running. In both cases, I run less than 30 seconds before slowly riding off.

On the Monster, I couldn't really tell when it was warm enough, so I just took it easy for a mile or so. The ST2 has a working temperature gauge, so I wait for about 150 degrees. (It also has a clock and a gas gauge that is more accurate than the one in my car.)

Except for Monsters that have been modified with flat slide carburetors, you can't flood the carbureted or the fuel injected bikes. Open the throttle three or four times on a bike with flat slides before starting it and there is a chance of flooding it.
 

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Once you turn the key and the FI ramps up turning the throttle is the same as if you were doing the same thing to a carbrated bike. So yes, you can flood a FI bike.
 

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When i start my (FI) S4, I have my left hand on the fast idle lever, so I can quickly control the idle speed to 2000-2500 or so.

If I pull it all the way, it'll jump to about 4000 or so when it starts, which isn't real friendly to a cold engine. The oil doesn't flow well when it's cold, so try to keep the idle reasonable till the engine warms up a bit.

I've never started the bike below about 35 degF though, so I don't know how it behaves below that. I do know that when it's that cold, it really doesn't want to start.
Well, when i was in the garage last night, the M900 gave me that "please fire me up" look, and i had to do it. I pull the fast idle lever all the way. It still took a few tries (it has ben sitting for a couple weeks) Once it fired up, it idles at 1800-ish rpm, at full pull on the lever. Once its started i can shut the fast idle totally off and it idles fine at around 1000 rpm. Good throttle response even. Oh, and it was about 9* outside. Now, after its been running a few minutes, and i pull the fast idle lever all the way, the idle goes up to 3500 or so.

Kevin
'00 M900
 

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Once you turn the key and the FI ramps up turning the throttle is the same as if you were doing the same thing to a carbrated bike. So yes, you can flood a FI bike.
The only way to flood a motor is to pump fuel into it when it's not running. Carburetors with accelerator pumps, like on most older American cars and like on the Keihin FCR carburetors that are popular additions to Monsters, pump fuel into the engine every time you open them. When the engine is running, this is supposed to help keep the air/fuel mixture correct, since air accelerates more quickly than liquid does.

The standard Mikuni carburetors that come on Monsters are constant vacuum type with no accelerator pump. You open the throttle, which opens a downstream throttle plate, but the carburetor slide in the middle rises according to the speed of the air going through it. That way, the flow of fuel matches the flow of air and the mixture is correct all the time.

Fuel injection squirts in fuel based on engine speed and throttle opening. When you have zero engine speed, you have zero fuel flow regardless of the throttle opening.

Therefore, you can't flood an engine with CV carburetors or with fuel injection.

Would you care to explain why you think it is possible to flood a fuel injection engine?
 

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I get good starting results in 40-50 F weather by only using lever some 10% ...
There are ways to adjust that movement, and seems for me the "full choke" does not do any good.

So a bit more idle and better cold start.

For My Monster anyway...

Skier
 

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Therefore, you can't flood an engine with CV carburetors or with fuel injection.

Would you care to explain why you think it is possible to flood a fuel injection engine?
You can flood an FI engine that has a supplementary cold-start injector. My Alfa GTV6s used to give me problems when it was warm; the CS injector would put in unneeded fuel and unless I floored the throttle (to open up for max airflow) the mixture would be too rich to ignite. I finally learned that if it didn't turn over right away, I should pop the hood and unplug the wire on that injector, then try again with throttle floored.

So the answer is that you can flood an FI engine when the engine management software isn't right ;D
 

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The only way to flood a motor is to pump fuel into it when it's not running. Therefore, you can't flood an engine with CV carburetors or with fuel injection.

Would you care to explain why you think it is possible to flood a fuel injection engine?
I've managed to flood an old MG with the factory CV carburetors, and I've had several FI cars that would flood if your cold-start procedure wasn't correct. Although it's true that neither one pumps in gas when the engine isn't turning, it's also true that both have to pump in gas when the engine is turning but not running (i.e. on the starter). So there exists an opportunity for things to get weird. It's certainly not as common as with pumper carbs, but it can (and occasionally does) happen.

OTOH, the FI on the Duc seems very well-sorted, and I'd be pretty surprised if it was possible to flood that one unless something was hosed.

M.
 

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on a car, the FI adds needed fuel and air for cold start. on your bike, the FI adds the needed fuel for cold start, but you add the air with the fast idle lever. if you do not add the air, your mixture might be too rich.
 

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My Alfa GTV6s used to give me problems when it was warm; the CS injector would put in unneeded fuel and unless I floored the throttle (to open up for max airflow) the mixture would be too rich to ignite. I finally learned that if it didn't turn over right away, I should pop the hood and unplug the wire on that injector, then try again with throttle floored.
Hey Don, you're bringing back happy memories. In that same situation, my GTV6 would occasionally backfire with enough force to blow the plenum chamber clear off the top of the engine. Sounded like a grenade had gone off under the hood. It won me instant celebrity with the teenagers on duty at the gas station where it first happened. After that, I learned to carry a long screwdriver so I could put everything back together. Or if I was in a hurry, I'd simply climb up onto the engine and stamp on the plenum until it seated back into the stacks. Ahh, the joys of Italian vehicles...
 

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I hate to go off topic, but....

I was told many times that my technique would result in "plenum ejection," but it never happened to me ;D

I just have that rare Italian Machine Karma ;)
 

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My Milano Verde used to blow the plenum too. The hood pad had the 6C of the plenum engraved on it from all the blows. It is amazing I found a group of people who suffered through all of this too!
 

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He he. Now we've totally hijacked this thread....

I read today that Ducati has sold 130,000 Monsters since introduction. Alfa must have sold far fewer GTV6s and Milanos.

And now we have the ultra-rare subset of people who've owned both!

Finally selling my '85 GTV6 in 2001 is what got me to scratch the motorcycle itch, and the Monster was the ONLY choice. That was decided even before I seriously considered getting a bike. If/when I got into bikes, a Monster was the first stop.
 
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