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How many cc's is your bike?

  • Li'l bitty guy: less than 600 cc's)

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someguy said:
Still got the 250?
Sorry SG, I haven't checked this thread in awhile. I sold the 250 to a guy who is over six feet. He wants it for the back of his motorhome. I also have a 250 Ninja (the other was a Rebel). My daughter uses the Ninja, but she drops it too often for my comfort. I told my husband that I should turn it into a track bike for me (though I've never been to a track).
 

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Hi Belle,
Just noticed this thread and thought I'd throw in my 2cents...albeit belated...
As you and MsIncredible know, I started riding about 7 months ago, and bought a M620 (absolutely loved it) to start off with. Rationale behind it being that I thought I would only ride on the weekends as a way to see the Bay Area countryside. Therefore, I wanted something that could handle the freeway riding portion without my having to gun the throttle all the way. However having said that... I try and ride whenever I can now EVERYWHERE! ;D ;D

About 4 weeks ago, I bought a 900 SuperSport because I felt ready for the change. I had put in a couple of seasons on the M620, I had planned out and executed a strategic steep learning curve on how to become a better and skilled rider and felt reasonably assured that I could handle the bike that I've been dreaming about to this point. I knew I wanted another Ducati and in RED! ;D Then, took her out to a Keigwin's 2-Day Novice School at the racetrack and learned a ton about myself and my new bike.

I absolutely love riding the 900ss because:

*extra torque when I need it
*I don't get blown around as much on the freeways
*I smile whenever I am on her (and those Remus pipes sound divine!!!)

The last is the most important to me. I went with what I wanted in my heart and not with what others were telling me. I think that's an important thinking to adhere to... do what you think is best since only YOU know YOURSELF the most. [thumbsup]
 

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Discussion Starter #63
You're very TALL and have an athletic physique. I think that makes a huge difference (if only mentally.) For instance, you hear a lot of gals who's first struggle is touching the ground. Trying to manage a 400 lb. machine that balances on two quarter-sized pieces of rubber sounds daunting, but it isn't any harder if you're 4'-11" or 5'-11". However, shorter gals think it's more of a challenge. They get the smaller bikes because they're often told that it'll be easier to pick up or move around, and that's not entirely true. A bike's manageability at slow speeds has a lot to do with how the weight is situated, the rider's position, bars, etc. Lots of women who get Harleys have little trouble maneuvering them because of the way the bike is set up--not just because they can touch the ground.

So how do you like the SS? I've ridden one and was humbled by how easily the front wanted to come up compared to my Monster. Same engine size, but the SS has an edge to it that the Monster does not. I can only imagine what an eye-opener the transition must have been between it and your 620!
 

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i ride an M750s and it's plenty of bike for me.

a few people suggested that i start with a smaller cc bike,
but i never really concerned about playing it "safer" than
i normally would as i'm a pretty conservative rider.

a woman i met one day, whilst i was still riding cupcake,
asked me if i wanted to ride... i said definitely! she said
i shouldn't get anything smaller than a 750. that stuck
with me.

i like the size of my bike because it's managable for me.
i had an opportunity to ride my sweetie's M900 once;
it seemed to have more power, but i'm still a newbie so
i didn't really get to feel the torque difference. perhaps
i'll be able to check out other options as i get more miles
under my belt.

my main focus now is mastering my bike and widening
my chicken strips.

;)
 

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Mostrobelle said:
You're very TALL and have an athletic physique. I think that makes a huge difference (if only mentally.) For instance, you hear a lot of gals who's first struggle is touching the ground. Trying to manage a 400 lb. machine that balances on two quarter-sized pieces of rubber sounds daunting, but it isn't any harder if you're 4'-11" or 5'-11". However, shorter gals think it's more of a challenge. They get the smaller bikes because they're often told that it'll be easier to pick up or move around, and that's not entirely true. A bike's manageability at slow speeds has a lot to do with how the weight is situated, the rider's position, bars, etc. Lots of women who get Harleys have little trouble maneuvering them because of the way the bike is set up--not just because they can touch the ground.
At the doctor's office this week, my height was measured... I came in at 5'6-1/4... I think I'm shrinking... [laugh]
You have a good point, I am much more on my toes when seated on the SS. Whereas, when I was seated on the Monster, my feet were fully flat on the ground plus my knees were bent a good amount. It is not my preference and I'll think about shaving the sides of my seat ... maybe later.

Mostrobelle said:
So how do you like the SS? I've ridden one and was humbled by how easily the front wanted to come up compared to my Monster. Same engine size, but the SS has an edge to it that the Monster does not. I can only imagine what an eye-opener the transition must have been between it and your 620!
I defer to you re: front wanting to come up... I'm a pretty conservative rider. It is something to aspire to as I get more comfortable on the bike... I'll look to you for inspiration! [thumbsup] Since I have great respect for the power of the SS, I am much more careful on it... on the 620, I was already pushing it and getting too comfortable with it and thus not paying as much attention. Don't know if you heard but I nearly crashed on a recent ride on the 620 while I was attempting the Muir Woods twisties at a speed way too high for me to be doing going into a corner. Learned a HUGE amount from that near accident about the physics of my bike and some do's and don'ts...
 

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empress duc said:
my main focus now is mastering my bike and widening
my chicken strips.
Narrow your chicken strips, young Jedi...
Let the force run through you; feel the contact between the tire's edge and the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
CharliesAngel said:
At the doctor's office this week, my height was measured... I came in at 5'6-1/4... I think I'm shrinking... [laugh]
You have a good point, I am much more on my toes when seated on the SS. Whereas, when I was seated on the Monster, my feet were fully flat on the ground plus my knees were bent a good amount. It is not my preference and I'll think about shaving the sides of my seat ... maybe later.
I defer to you re: front wanting to come up... I'm a pretty conservative rider. It is something to aspire to as I get more comfortable on the bike... I'll look to you for inspiration! [thumbsup] Since I have great respect for the power of the SS, I am much more careful on it... on the 620, I was already pushing it and getting too comfortable with it and thus not paying as much attention. Don't know if you heard but I nearly crashed on a recent ride on the 620 while I was attempting the Muir Woods twisties at a speed way too high for me to be doing going into a corner. Learned a HUGE amount from that near accident about the physics of my bike and some do's and don'ts...
My 9:05 wheelies aren't inspiration for anyone except Tigre, who likes to ::) at me when I try it. I have yet to move out of my giant, unoccupied parking lot venue doing them either, so witnesses to the event are few. [laugh]

I didn't hear about that near-miss. Yikes. No more of that, ya hear? I don't like updating the crash ticker. It involves numbers an' math which makes my head hurt.
 

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msincredible said:
For me, the issue with being short (or more accurately, having a short inseam) was not maneuvering the bike while riding.

It was handling it at stops or parking situations.

It is challenging to have to park your bike if you can't roll around on it because you are tiptoeing it on both sides.

Knowing that any small screw-up, or accidentally trying to put your foot down where there is a 1-inch dip in the road surface, will cause your bike to go over, is very intimidating. This makes it really hard to have confidence in the bike overall.

Once I was more experienced, then the shortness didn't matter so much.
i totally agree with this... for me, it's still very challenging and intimidating during parking situations.
 

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If I see a little hill or rough road and I need to park or move a few feet, I tend to just get off and push. If I lean the bike over on my right hip and hold the handle bars, she is pretty secure. I've found the whole walking and pushing thing to be far superior to desperately trying to dig my big toe into the ground in order to push my 400 lb motorcycle two feet backward.

I used to be kind of intimidated at the thought of pushing the bike (it seems safer sitting on the thing with both feet down) but after a little practice it is actually quite a bit easier to push it than try to maneuver sitting on it.
 

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My 1st bike was a Honda 175. Once, when trying to pass a semi on the interstate with a headwind, I had to move over two lanes to do so, LOL. I moved up to a Honda 550, then later to a Kawasaki ZX6R, which handled well & was pretty fast! For the past 6 years I rode a Suzuki Hayabusa, which was extremely fast, but so very smooth & well mannered. I had to have it lowered and have the handlebars modified, as the reach was too long for me. I'm now in the market for a new bike & have settled on the Ducati 1200S, as I liked the responsiveness of the Busa, but want a lighter bike & lower seat, along with anti-lock brakes & traction control. So, the 1200S is perfect for me, and hopefully I'll be able to buy it before long!!! :)
 

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I've been weary about my wife moving straight from her ninja 250 to a s1000rrrr BMW. Not because I don't think her as a woman can handle it, just because I know what those bikes are capable of. If it were mine I would ride it as it was intended to be ridden and get a rush every time. I tend to push it. I often forget that that is not her riding style. She does not get on the throttle like I do, she has no interest in being on one wheel. Respectively, I feel that she has a better chance of survival on it than I do. That being said, from my perspective, there are more inherent risks associated with a high speed machine like that, whiskey throttle on a smaller monster will most likely not present as uncontrollable conditions, and I know I'm going to hear something about this. I moved up slowly in the CCs and for that matter the horsepower. I think it's safer for any rider to do the same. I enjoy my s2r1000 and I know she will enjoy it or something similar soon. As of right now, she wants a 696 because monsters are growing on her, and the sr is a little too tall. She and I both think it would be a good fit. Let me also say that I have seen women handle liter-plus bikes with no problems, comfortably, after having ridden a 600cc or less for anywhere from 1 season to 3 years. By the way a general comparison of a 600cc "street bike" like a cbr yzf or gsxr is a lot faster than monster and has the capability of higher speeds.
 

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I ride a 2007 Monster S4R Testastretta and love every minute of it! CCs really shouldn't matter, if your a physically able to handle the bike (ie your feet touch the ground) buy what makes you happy.
 

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It's def about what makes you happy and what you feel comfortable on, especially when it comes to handling. I moved up in bikes...

Suzuki blvd M50 (1st street bike- had to choose cruiser style, had back surgery and wasn't sure about positioning) rode with hubby and some Speed Triple Forum friends, started dragging pegs and couldn't keep up with the guys. So...

99 monster 900s. Fellin love with the positioning. Took her on for a track day. Her handling apparently was bad, (told by all who rode it)but I didn't know any better and gained experience cornering. The guys would go slower into the corners and throttle it out and leave me in the dust. Well I learned the only way to keep up was go hard into the corners because I didn't have much torque to turn to coming out. Then we planned our epic trip and I had to find another bike that would withstand the altitude changes. We didn't want to risk my bike not working thousands of miles from home. So...

Sv1000s such a great bike really. Only hubby had to fabricate a lowering link to lower her 4 inches. This does interfere with the handling a little bit, but I didn't know any better :) I started to fall in love with the torque. Sure I did the ton every time I went for a ride but that's not what drove me. I really enjoy trying to master the corners, getting your butt off the seat and maybe one day touching my knee! But she was heavy. She got tired a lot and laid over gently here and there ;) so for my birthday hubby bought me

Monster 1200- man what an awesome bike! When I got off from riding the first time I said to my husband "OMG, is this what a motorcycle is suppose to feel like? I have been robbed!" I found myself at home again, with the positioning and fit as well.

Having only had used sport bikes and the boulevard, I had no idea what handling was suppose to feel like. Absolutely love the torque. Just recently got the miles for the first service so I will get to really open her up and play soon enough!

In a nutshell-- the torque and the need "not to have people waiting on me" were my reasons for a larger bike. They were always very good and understanding about it. They never pushed me, just personal I guess.
 

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Wow great to see fellow female riders. I hardly run into any on the road. I'm frankly tired of being gawked at. Wish we had more female riders around. I love my monster 695. Nothing gives greater pleasure than just letting the throttle rip on the road. It's frankly addicting. Anyone else overcome the whole gawking thing successfully?
Otherwise on the original cc question, I think it really depends on what you're comfortable riding. One of my sisters rides an R6 and the other is just learning to ride a Triumph Speed Triple. To each her own I guess.
 

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My new Monster 1200S w/ tail bag

Thank you, and yes, the tail bag is pretty large--45 liters to be exact. I had to go to that size to be able to hold a full-size helmet in it with a few extras. As for what I normally carry in it, I use the bike to commute to work, and so I usually have my purse & a 2nd bag containing my work clothes, as I always wear full-protective, dedicated bike gear to ride, meaning I change clothes at work. I avoid saddle bags as I lane-spilt, and therefore, want to maintain a narrow bike profile. The bag can be removed with a key when I don't need it, and I agree with you in not liking backpacks, which I consider to be unsafe in the event of an accident. Plus, they're hot and interfere with my jacket's airflow.
 
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