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How many cc's is your bike?

  • Li'l bitty guy: less than 600 cc's)

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The bike of my dreams [thumbsup] I had one on my birthday list but no go :(

I had a DR 650 in the early 90's and loved it. At 5'9" seat height is not an issue.

I would talk to the sales manager about the comment. Us women love to buy things, bikes included.
 

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It's pretty amazing to read about all the bikes ladies out there ride. A couple people have touched on this in their posts, but I just want to highlight that the cc size of a bike doesn't tell the whole story of the bike's power and performance. Engine type and tuning can make even the same size cc bikes very different. One of my bikes is an inline 4 with 599ccs displacement. In order to get the most out of this bike I need to ride it in the powerband (around 12K rpms) with my chest practically on the tank, my weight over the front and a lot of countersteering. At those rpms my yoshi pipe is screaming and the throttle response is immediate and drastic. My monster has the ltwin engine with tons of torque that delivers a smooth power increase at almost any rpm (even in the wrong gear!). Pretty much same engine size, but completely different animals to ride. It is problematic to compare two completely different types of bikes/engines that have the same cc displacement.

Having said that... I certainly think women can ride big bikes, but there are some other considerations as well. In general, there aren't that many places you can unleash the power of 1000cc sportbike engine except on the race track. Look, anyone can crack open a throttle and hang on in a straight line... taking corners correctly is very different. Large cc engines on sportbikes seems like a bit of overkill for me. This comment has nothing to do with women, its just a comment on the amazing power and performance of large cc sportbikes and their suitability for street riding. Not that they aren't fun, but very few people ride the bike to its full potential on the street.

Finally, large powerful engines can be a bit more challenging to learn on. Basic riding techniqes like steady throttle around a corner are easier to practice on a throttle that isn't twitchy and prone to sudden speed increases with a little pressure. I started on a Ninja 250 and learned my riding skills. There is a lot you can do on that bike. Although I did move up in engine size, I encourage riders to start on more manageable bikes when they are just learning. Sure, you can certainly learn on a bigger bike, but it can be a bit tougher. Again, these comments have nothing to do with women learning... they apply to both men and women.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I'm really enjoying reading all of the replies here. [thumbsup] I keep noticing a defensive tone popping up here and there about engine size, and I'd like to clarify that I realize that size has nothing to do with ability to ride well or go fast. I know some folks out here in my neck of the woods that can fricken FLY on a 250 and a 400 specificially. As I stated earlier, I own a 900 in addition to my 400 but it isn't because I'm insecure about the size of my penis. [cheeky]
 

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MonsterHooligan said:
salesman it was for my wife, he said 'really? that Hypermotard is a lot of bike' (and i heard 'for a girl' after that)
evidently she heard that too, cuz when i told her...she said there is no way in hell we are buying a bike from that jackass. [thumbsup] [laugh]
I don't know why people have to say that. Like Mostrobelle just said, the cc of the bike has nothing to do with the ability to ride well. I've yet to come back with a good response. Sarcasm is my first response, but it doesn't get the point across, nor does it make friends.

I have heard the comment out of women's mouths, as well as men - and my reaction is the same as Karen's (they're a jackass!!). It rankles me to no end!!!
 

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Mostrobelle said:
A lot of women tend toward smaller bikes and I wondered how many of them felt pressured into it. I was reading another board last night and one of the women mentioned that she had been reluctant to get a larger bike until after she was divorced. I guess her husband had actually told her that he didn't think she could handle it. A few other ladies chimed in with similar experiences with family, boyfriends, salespeople. Surprised me....
Idk about the pressure nonsense-I encourage the gf to take my bike whenever she wants, but I was under the impression a lot of women tended towards smaller bikes because of rider weight. Paula has a better power to weight ratio on her 695 than I do on my S4R-I imagine it takes longer to grow out of maybe?
 

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czaja said:
I would talk to the sales manager about the comment. Us women love to buy things, bikes included.
<apologies for the sorta thread-jack>
why bother? its not up to me to fix their business. good customer service comes from the top down.
I actually did go back to the same dealer to buy the bike. i thought it would be easier to get in for service if you buy the bike there....
waited on the sales floor for a half-hour and couldnt get anybody to help me.
(they clearly did not know WHO I AM [cheeky])

so i called Dave from Ducati Seattle while standing on their sales floor.
Hey dave, wanna sell us a Hyper?
-absolutely, come on down

fantastic experience, and every single person and every detail of the process exceeded our expectations. best vehicle buying experience i have ever had. when it needs service, i'll truck it to Seattle or Portland (motocorsa is nice too ;))

<back on track>
when we were at the hotel, the valet brought the truck up with the bike in the back, and started talking to me about what a beautiful bike i had.
i said talk to her, its her bike.
he was admiring it, and asked what cc's it was. she said 1100.
wow, 1100? do you really need that much?
looked him right in the eye....'absolutely'
8)
 

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Discussion Starter #47
someguy said:
Idk about the pressure nonsense-I encourage the gf to take my bike whenever she wants, but I was under the impression a lot of women tended towards smaller bikes because of rider weight. Paula has a better power to weight ratio on her 695 than I do on my S4R-I imagine it takes longer to grow out of maybe?
I think for a lot of women that the size of the bike is directly proportional to their comfort level with it. For many of us confidence is the biggest key when learning to ride. I didn't know what cc's were when I bought the Monster. If someone had bothered to tell me I might have passed on the purchase. What I did know was that it felt like a banshee with its hair on fire when I turned the throttle in comparison to the GS500 that I had at the time. The power scared me a little (make that "a lot,") and I took my time making the Ducati my only bike--a year actually. I feel now that I could ride any bike and the cc's wouldn't matter. How well I could ride it--well, that's another story. [laugh] I feel like bigger bikes take a lot more skill to ride safely, but as you said, it's something you can grow into.

On the flip side of that coin, when I used to take the Monster to the track I felt like I was a pretty good rider. What I didn't know was that the power and torque provided to me through that big engine masked a lot of my riding flaws. Poor shifting technique and bad lines can be made up for when you have the Monster's engine to haul you out of a corner even at 2500 rpm. I'm a better rider due to the smaller bike, even though not everything I do on the 400 directly translates to the 900. I have more fun on the 400 at the track because I don't worry about highsides or wheelies.
 

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I like this discussion about women on big bikes.. most of the time threads are dedicated to .. what bike should i start out with, etc.
I guess i consider my experience on "bigger" bikes.. unless u consider starting out on an SV650 a big bike... limited

I got pulled over once (shame .. holds head low) at a high rate of speed.. to my defense i was gettin by an 18 wheeler.. and just never let off. I admit it was nothing to have that bike at 90 on the highway.. i know better now. :sorry mom:

The troper said.. what size bike is this.. i told him, he was thoroughly impressed and shocked that a girl was riding a 650 Vtwin .. he obviously didn't know it was a sport touring bike. But he was a bit condescending saying.. i'm shocked a girl rides such a big bike. He told me he rode an R1 and to have a nice night, to slow it down and be careful.
:)

So, then.. when i moved "up" to a Triumph Daytona 675 triple , it really was in all aspects, besides power, a smaller bike. it was lighter, more responsive, quick, nimble and just an over all rocket. put 7k miles on her, took her to the track and Thankfully never getting pulled over on that one :)

I did kill her, may the 675 rest in peace, and got myself a Monster s2r 1k.
As Laura now knows.. i'm puzzled by this bike. I don't think it really has the power that my 675 did.
I know they are completely different, and you ladies will have to help me out .. i really want to learn to love my new ride. But, coming off a 6 month hiatus, putting only 800 miles on the Duc in a week, well, i still don't love her. She's temperamental to say the least (i'm sure just mechanical issues that i'll quickly resolve). Not smooth at all although she takes a turn quite nicely. I'm used to a bike that purrs like a kitten.. this Duc seems to growl and scratch and claw like a black bear.

Smaller vs. Bigger in cc's... honestly not sold on the subject of more cc's being more powerful or more fun or better to ride. in fact.. i'm still stuck on the opposite end of the spectrum.

it's all about personal riding style though for sure. I love the back road twisties, and i love the track and i just want my bike to be stable and feel like i have control of it on the highway.
I'm convinced that no one "needs" a liter bike on the streets.. but the R1 i rode one weekend sure scared the pants off me with it's power, pickup and handling.. WOW could i get in trouble on that ride.

side note
Apparently even the Harley guys were impressed with my Duc in Daytona... and even more so when they found out it was a 1k bike. A few came up to ask, and of course said.. is that the 800 ? and their jaw dropped when they found out it was bigger.. what gives? is it really a "bigger is better", penis envy thing?
 

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Personally, I love seeing women on BIG bikes. Perhaps it's just that Lil was my flatmate for so many years, with her CBR600F4i, then the 695, she looked great on them. Not sure why there are always the "jaw droppers" when a woman mentions a larger capacity bike, perhaps it's male ego, perhaps jealousy that hers is bigger than his? Either way, I like seeing women who can ride riding big bikes. It's sexy.

And I KNOW they are having fun! I can see the smiles through the visors!

Z...
 

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DirtDiva, that bike should feel stable. get it checked out. Ride a demo (or mine) to see if they do the same thing. Something's wrong - and it could be a 10 minute fix. The S2R is a GREAT BIKE (for any rider, male or female).

Cool that you had it in Daytona. Looks like I missed the wrong year. Hubby, friend and I went 2 years running, and decided to take a break. Next year!!!

Lots of guys feel that a girl on a big bike is sexy!! I don't know - maybe it';s that she's got the confidence to master it. I get the best looks riding my husband's Yamaha Warrior. 1700 cc's of pure pumping power. She's a beauty of a bike - but not for me. over 600 pounds and cruiser seating position. Don't like either - but the looks from the other riders are priceless!!!

I do agree the weight to bike ratio is an issue. Upper body strength. arm length to handlebar spread. center of gravity of the bike to the center of gravity of the rider. It all adds up to a difference. The ducati tends to negate a lot of these issues. My old bike never put the huge smile on my face like the S2R!!!
 

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I spent about 10 years riding a DR650 (I still have it) and never felt that I'd outgrown it, despite the fact that it makes 34 HP. I really am a wimp; I'd had it for 5 years when it occurred to me one day that I'd never opened the throttle past halfway. Oops.

I didn't set out to get a much more powerful bike when I bought the Monster. It just happened that a friend of mine was selling it, and I really liked what he had done with the bike. At first the extra power was intimidating! But after a while I found it easier to ride than the DR. It's not as unstable at low speeds, and I can actually touch the ground on both sides of the bike.
 

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I started on a 48hp F650, currently have an 85hp F800. Looking at an 80hp M900 Wednesday.

Starting out smaller absolutely benefitted me--as did a carburated bike. I think the computer on my F800 compensates for less-than-perfect shift technique a lot.
 

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I started on a 250. Four days later I wanted something bigger so I got my used, dinged up m750. I sat on a S2R1000 last Saturday and really liked it. My husband wanted me to buy it right then. I'm going to stick to my goal of having at least a full year of riding experience before i buy a new bike. I don't know if I should go for the S2R1000 or 800. Is there a big difference?
 

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MBalmer said:
I started on a 250. Four days later I wanted something bigger so I got my used, dinged up m750. I sat on a S2R1000 last Saturday and really liked it. My husband wanted me to buy it right then. I'm going to stick to my goal of having at least a full year of riding experience before i buy a new bike. I don't know if I should go for the S2R1000 or 800. Is there a big difference?
Still got the 250?
 

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MBalmer said:
I started on a 250. Four days later I wanted something bigger so I got my used, dinged up m750. I sat on a S2R1000 last Saturday and really liked it. My husband wanted me to buy it right then. I'm going to stick to my goal of having at least a full year of riding experience before i buy a new bike. I don't know if I should go for the S2R1000 or 800. Is there a big difference?
Yes. It's a trade off, and it's up to you to know yourself to decide.
Here's where my comments are coming from: Had a Seca 600 (Japanese, had to get it into the higher RPMs to get any power out of it) and bought a S2R1000 (but the husband thought I'd be better suited to an 800)

Trade offs:

Very responsive to the slightes twist of the throttle. Which means you need to adjust from thrashing the throttle to get power to very slight twist to getting a HUGE amount of thrust (beware - it's addictive). For the first year I had to respect the power and be VERY conservative on the throttle. The flight/fight response to grab the throttle needs to be fully overcome - or you could do some serious damage to yourself.

The brakes are different (meaning more precise). Others who have ridden the bike have told me the brakes are touchy and they realized to not treat them like the brakes on their 620 or they'd end up over the handlebars. Maybe it has something to do with the 1000 weighing more ( so there's more inertia), I'm not a physics major so I can't tell you. The adjustment was automatic for me - I never noticed the brakes being touchy. The automatice response to grabbing a handful of brakes has never been there, so I didn't have a problem.

You'll adapt to the 800 faster to the 1000, but outgrow the 800 faster than the 1000. I've always loved fast cars, so I knew I'd want a fst bike. My ultimate goal was the 1000, so extra patience (which is normally in short supply) was needed to get me through the first year. Really slow around corners (so I didn't grip the throttle too fast), lots of feathering the clutch (I'm an expert and you should see the muscles in my left hand), lots of applying the brakes evenly and smoothly.

My left hand had to adjust to the difference in the clutch, and it had to be smooth. Don't want to rocket through intersections!!

The above are my observations. We're all different. Ride the bike. See how it feels.
The demo bike convinced me that that was the bike for me. I didn't care what it took - I wanted that bike. She fit me perfectly and everything just felt right. I'm so glad I got the 1000. There's more differences (wet clutch, more adjustments to the suspension) that others will tell you, but the above is what mattered to me (along with the higher resale value - but that means a higher purchase price).

Let us know what you decide (and post pics!!) [thumbsup]
laura
 

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It's all about what you're comfortable on. I had never touched handlebars outside of MSF before my M900s. I'm also comfortable on my boyfriend's (former bike, not former bf) GSX-R 1000. It has twice the hp but is 40 pounds lighter. Fun bike for the street. I wouldn't dare touch it on the track. Even he said that racing my SV was better than the GSX-R. The SV is my track tool.
 
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