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Well, after getting tired of riding on the back of my bike, my wife decided she wanted to ride her own bike. I can't say I blame her, I'd rather not sit on the backside of a bike :p

Anyhow, I love her very much and I worry about her skills, size and physical ability on a bike.

I made her take the MSF course before I would let her try to ride a bike... I ended up taking the MSF course with her and found it to be a good learning experience.

During the course she rode a Honda Nighthawk 250 and liked the size but not the looks. I tried to convince her to get a 250 to learn on like a rebel or the nighthawk. Both are very light and easy to control. She was hell bent on getting a sport bike!.

2 days after completing the course she found a 02' Ducati Monster 620 Dark i.e. and made up her mind that it was the bike for her.

First on the agenda for me was making sure the bike was safe for her.

My Wife is about 5'1", curvy and has a short reach.

I have lowered the bike about as far as it will go and had the seat shaved. She can now get both balls of her feet down. I also installed some ASV adjustable levers (she could barely reach the clutch lever!) I also ordered some "city" handlebars for her but I'm still waiting for them.


After all of the modifications I rode it over to a large empty parking lot to let her practice on it. She was riding very slow and did ok. After hitting the parking lot session, I hopped on my bike and took her for her first ride on residential streets around our house. As I followed her I noticed that she seems very nervous and rides a little too slow (about 5-10mph BELOW the speed limit) and she dropped her bike coming out of a parking lot (target fixation). It was really low speed so she didn’t get hurt at all and the bike didn't suffer any major damage, minor scrapes on the bar-ends and frame sliders.

She "says" she feels confident but from my point of view, she isn't. She wants to start riding for real but I am still concerned about her skill level.

What I would like to do is pickup some of those cones they used for the MSF course and setup a practice course some what like the MSF did for working on her basic skills on her new bike. Anyone know where I can buy some?


Some of the things I have been wondering about and would like to ask the advice of you ladies out there:

1) When you were learning to ride, what obstacles/challenges did you overcome to become the rider you are today?
Skills, techniques you had to work on the most and what helped you deal with them.

2) Did you feel better riding with your husband/significant other or with other people?
I feel that it might be better for someone else to act as a mentor for her while she is still learning. I have a feeling she might take instruction better from someone else.

3) Do you prefer riding with other woman or with your S.O.?


4) Are there any schools that pickup where MSF left off?
MSF is great for theory but you never go over 15mph or so in a parking lot and does not quite equate into street riding.

5) Like I said, my wife is short and “curvy” and I’m trying to find some suitable riding pants for her with her short legs and curvy hips. Who makes good safety equipment for someone who does not fit into the stereotypical size 4 dress? Would leather chaps suffice?



Any advice you gals can give me would be appreciated! Any tips or suggestions that you can give to help me make sure that I can bring my wife up to speed in a safe enjoyable manner.

Thanks in advance!
 

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read Sport Riding Techniques (can't remember author) or similar books. most are a quick read with valuable lessons, techniques, suggestions, etc.
 

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Flow baby, flow

Sounds dangerous.... One thing to remember, time, hours, practice. Confidance comes from familiarity,and testing yourself.
Following a smooth, confident rider (at the speed limit on an empty country road at first) is very good too, paying attention to braking points, turning points, going slow dosen't make you smooth, quite the opposite, flowing in a good rythym makes you smooth, and nothing makes you more confident than feeling everything working right for hours on end.

If they haven't taught her panic stops, practice that is a empty lot or something, this you do not want to find out in the real world. What's it like to lock up the brakes, or just learning at what speed the brakes will lock up and how the bike handles when it has all that force, i.e.
A perfectly straight attempt may stay staight, but anything else may be shocking to a novice, and the re-action will probably be an instinctive bail off.
Like in a car, it's almost impossable to get a person to take their foot off the brake when the car isn't stopping fast enough, you have to train the brain.
Now , crowded city driving is a whole other story, intense, herky jerky, stop and go, a different kind of flow is needed, the kind that keeps you from being run over by autos in their insulated bumper cars and an riders experiencing an overload of sensoury input from all the things needed to see to survive at first, save that for later.

Well, after getting tired of riding on the back of my bike, my wife decided she wanted to ride her own bike. I can't say I blame her, I'd rather not sit on the backside of a bike :p

Anyhow, I love her very much and I worry about her skills, size and physical ability on a bike.

I made her take the MSF course before I would let her try to ride a bike... I ended up taking the MSF course with her and found it to be a good learning experience.

During the course she rode a Honda Nighthawk 250 and liked the size but not the looks. I tried to convince her to get a 250 to learn on like a rebel or the nighthawk. Both are very light and easy to control. She was hell bent on getting a sport bike!.

2 days after completing the course she found a 02' Ducati Monster 620 Dark i.e. and made up her mind that it was the bike for her.

First on the agenda for me was making sure the bike was safe for her.

My Wife is about 5'1", curvy and has a short reach.

I have lowered the bike about as far as it will go and had the seat shaved. She can now get both balls of her feet down. I also installed some ASV adjustable levers (she could barely reach the clutch lever!) I also ordered some "city" handlebars for her but I'm still waiting for them.


After all of the modifications I rode it over to a large empty parking lot to let her practice on it. She was riding very slow and did ok. After hitting the parking lot session, I hopped on my bike and took her for her first ride on residential streets around our house. As I followed her I noticed that she seems very nervous and rides a little too slow (about 5-10mph BELOW the speed limit) and she dropped her bike coming out of a parking lot (target fixation). It was really low speed so she didn’t get hurt at all and the bike didn't suffer any major damage, minor scrapes on the bar-ends and frame sliders.

She "says" she feels confident but from my point of view, she isn't. She wants to start riding for real but I am still concerned about her skill level.

What I would like to do is pickup some of those cones they used for the MSF course and setup a practice course some what like the MSF did for working on her basic skills on her new bike. Anyone know where I can buy some?


Some of the things I have been wondering about and would like to ask the advice of you ladies out there:

1) When you were learning to ride, what obstacles/challenges did you overcome to become the rider you are today?
Skills, techniques you had to work on the most and what helped you deal with them.

2) Did you feel better riding with your husband/significant other or with other people?
I feel that it might be better for someone else to act as a mentor for her while she is still learning. I have a feeling she might take instruction better from someone else.

3) Do you prefer riding with other woman or with your S.O.?


4) Are there any schools that pickup where MSF left off?
MSF is great for theory but you never go over 15mph or so in a parking lot and does not quite equate into street riding.

5) Like I said, my wife is short and “curvy” and I’m trying to find some suitable riding pants for her with her short legs and curvy hips. Who makes good safety equipment for someone who does not fit into the stereotypical size 4 dress? Would leather chaps suffice?



Any advice you gals can give me would be appreciated! Any tips or suggestions that you can give to help me make sure that I can bring my wife up to speed in a safe enjoyable manner.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Well, after getting tired of riding on the back of my bike, my wife decided she wanted to ride her own bike. I can't say I blame her, I'd rather not sit on the backside of a bike :p

Anyhow, I love her very much and I worry about her skills, size and physical ability on a bike.

I made her take the MSF course before I would let her try to ride a bike... I ended up taking the MSF course with her and found it to be a good learning experience.

During the course she rode a Honda Nighthawk 250 and liked the size but not the looks. I tried to convince her to get a 250 to learn on like a rebel or the nighthawk. Both are very light and easy to control. She was hell bent on getting a sport bike!.

2 days after completing the course she found a 02' Ducati Monster 620 Dark i.e. and made up her mind that it was the bike for her.

First on the agenda for me was making sure the bike was safe for her.

My Wife is about 5'1", curvy and has a short reach.

I have lowered the bike about as far as it will go and had the seat shaved. She can now get both balls of her feet down. I also installed some ASV adjustable levers (she could barely reach the clutch lever!) I also ordered some "city" handlebars for her but I'm still waiting for them.


After all of the modifications I rode it over to a large empty parking lot to let her practice on it. She was riding very slow and did ok. After hitting the parking lot session, I hopped on my bike and took her for her first ride on residential streets around our house. As I followed her I noticed that she seems very nervous and rides a little too slow (about 5-10mph BELOW the speed limit) and she dropped her bike coming out of a parking lot (target fixation). It was really low speed so she didn’t get hurt at all and the bike didn't suffer any major damage, minor scrapes on the bar-ends and frame sliders.

She "says" she feels confident but from my point of view, she isn't. She wants to start riding for real but I am still concerned about her skill level.

What I would like to do is pickup some of those cones they used for the MSF course and setup a practice course some what like the MSF did for working on her basic skills on her new bike. Anyone know where I can buy some?


Some of the things I have been wondering about and would like to ask the advice of you ladies out there:

1) When you were learning to ride, what obstacles/challenges did you overcome to become the rider you are today?
Skills, techniques you had to work on the most and what helped you deal with them.

2) Did you feel better riding with your husband/significant other or with other people?
I feel that it might be better for someone else to act as a mentor for her while she is still learning. I have a feeling she might take instruction better from someone else.

3) Do you prefer riding with other woman or with your S.O.?


4) Are there any schools that pickup where MSF left off?
MSF is great for theory but you never go over 15mph or so in a parking lot and does not quite equate into street riding.

5) Like I said, my wife is short and “curvy” and I’m trying to find some suitable riding pants for her with her short legs and curvy hips. Who makes good safety equipment for someone who does not fit into the stereotypical size 4 dress? Would leather chaps suffice?



Any advice you gals can give me would be appreciated! Any tips or suggestions that you can give to help me make sure that I can bring my wife up to speed in a safe enjoyable manner.

Thanks in advance!
where did and what kind are city bars?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
While lurking/searching around this forum trying to find some way to combat my Wife’s "reach" impairment, I came across a thread about them.

They are a little taller and reach a little further back than the stock handlebars.

I believe they came off of a 99' Monster 900 City.

I ordered them from Seattle Ducati as they were recommended because they stock them for just this reason.

I'll do a before and after picture when they come in to see how much of a difference they make.
 

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My wife learned better with somebody else helping than with me (I sucked at ski instruction too :) )
We went on a weekend trip and my friend took turns following and leading through corners while providing her tips via a chatterbox. (I also had a chatterbox to monitor transmissions to make sure the talk didnt stray from bike talk to sweet nothings)
She said the best thing she got out of it was learning to counter steer, as well as looking through the corner and lane position.

I think she would like to ride with other women...but there just havent been that many avail and she usually ends up riding with boys.
(she has now been riding over 10 years, and just added a Hyper 1100 to her stable, so keeping up is no longer an issue)

as others have said, the most important thing is practice and repetition in an environment without pressure to perform.

gear- try a bmw dealer, they usually a good selection of nice gear. leather chaps are better than nothing...but not much. you could also try a good online dealer like newenough.com that will allow exchanges for her to get stuff that fits.
good luck and have fun
jeff h
monsterparts
 

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parking lot cones

Thanks for the tip on the handlebars. I, too have a vertical and reach challenged wife that is a new rider on an M695. As an FYI I also installed the adjustable dogbone to drop the rear-end about 1.25" and added handlebar risers. As to practice cones, I picked up a bag of inexpensive tennis balls and cut them in half for her. She now has another woman freins that is at her level of riding and they go to a local school parking lot and practice their quick stops, tight turns, etc.
 

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my wife has a 696. she has just spent a year riding a kawasaki ninja 250.

i'm sorry, but it sounds your wife needs to gain some confidence on two wheels, which is why they use 250's at MSF courses. motorcycling is a bit like taking up rock climbing. you wouldn't climb a big rock until you had experience on lesser climbs. a 620 monster is a big rock if you can't control it.

remove the fear of the machine and allow her bike skills to develop. your wife can ride the 620 for the next 2 years, but she won't be as good a rider and exhibit the same levels of confidence as if she spent a year on a smaller 250 bike.

when she can go on a ride and not look down every time she comes to a stop sign, she will have learned something about her and the bike. a bigger engine just presents more challenges - the very last thing a new'beginning rider needs.

i started off on a horrific old honda 175, and in retrospect, i wish i'd spent a year on a 125.

one person's concept of safe is irrelevant to another without the same experience.like you, i took the MSF course with my wife and i found it very helpful and made it less intimidating for my wife. this is something i highly recommend all partners doing together.

finally, get out and ride every day in all weathers when safe to do so. riding just on weekends is a recipe for not learning or acquiring new skills.

10,000 miles later, she will be a totally different motorcyclist and she will have moved on from the 250. and she probably won't be as likely to drop a ducati coming out of a parking lot.

as you can tell, i am totally against new riders having a ducati as their first bike.
just because we want something doesn't mean we should have it.

best of luck to both of you and your riding adventures. it really is a great way to spend time with your partner.
 

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confidence and practice

Generally we women tend not to show more confidence in our abilities than we have. We usually downplay are abilities. MFS does offer courses that can advance her skills, not sure if there are any in your area.

As far as cones are concerned, you can pick them up at a sports store. Some of the ones used for soccer are good because they are designed so that they collapse under weight or let things (like soccerballs) roll over them. Plus they are short profile. The ones I have are only 2-3 inches tall.
 

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I find it easier to learn when no one is judging me. Though it's scary at first to be on your own, if you can put yourself somewhere safe... like a parking lot or some unused side-streets, it's much easier to relax. And when you're relaxed it's much easier to ride. When I ride with my boy I make him go first. That way if there are any obstacles or problems he can help alert me to it or find an alternate route, and I also don't feel like I'm constantly having to prove I deserve to be on a bike.

As for new riders on Ducati's, 620s are great bikes for beginners. Low, easy clutch, good response to input, great brakes, super light... It's my second bike and I wish I'd had something this easy to ride for my first. I'd have enjoyed it a ton more. They are a little pricey, but it's only money!

For the record, my last bike was a '90 Yamaha FZR 600. I have very few bad things to say about it, except that it's got one hard clutch pull and isn't something I'd recommend for many beginners. Though it did corner like the dickens. ;)
 

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There is a follow-up course to the basic MSF riding course. I would check the AMA website or MSF website for locations close to you. What makes these even better is they improve on the skills learned in the basic course, but allow the rider to get familiar and comfortable with their own bike.


After the course it took a few rides to get used to highway speeds and scanning. The basic class was a small grouping, closed course affair where 30-35mph was as much speed as you got. Much different than real world riding. My first few weeks I spent riding in low traffic areas and spent an hr a day working on the same skills found in the course. Time, practice, and patience on both your parts is the best advice I could give.
 

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My wife learned to ride 3 years ago and we both did the MSF course together, which was great for her and good for me to be a beginner once more. It removes 95% of the pressure, with the emphasis on slow speed maneuvers (which is where most problems occur). It's also great fun as you get to meet people of all ages, experience, etc. We got her a 250 Ninja which was the perfect bike for her. Now she has a 696 and can ride my 1100S without problems.

Ride a bicycle as much as you can, especially in town traffic It is the single biggest skill you can bring to motorcycling, and also makes you physically fitter which will help enormously once the fear-factor diminishes and you spend more time crafting riding skills on your bike.

Now, she almost never looks down, and on most rides, she is happy to take the lead.
 

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Well, after getting tired of riding on the back of my bike, my wife decided she wanted to ride her own bike. I can't say I blame her, I'd rather not sit on the backside of a bike :p

Anyhow, I love her very much and I worry about her skills, size and physical ability on a bike.

I made her take the MSF course before I would let her try to ride a bike... I ended up taking the MSF course with her and found it to be a good learning experience.

During the course she rode a Honda Nighthawk 250 and liked the size but not the looks. I tried to convince her to get a 250 to learn on like a rebel or the nighthawk. Both are very light and easy to control. She was hell bent on getting a sport bike!.

2 days after completing the course she found a 02' Ducati Monster 620 Dark i.e. and made up her mind that it was the bike for her.

First on the agenda for me was making sure the bike was safe for her.

My Wife is about 5'1", curvy and has a short reach.

I have lowered the bike about as far as it will go and had the seat shaved. She can now get both balls of her feet down. I also installed some ASV adjustable levers (she could barely reach the clutch lever!) I also ordered some "city" handlebars for her but I'm still waiting for them.


After all of the modifications I rode it over to a large empty parking lot to let her practice on it. She was riding very slow and did ok. After hitting the parking lot session, I hopped on my bike and took her for her first ride on residential streets around our house. As I followed her I noticed that she seems very nervous and rides a little too slow (about 5-10mph BELOW the speed limit) and she dropped her bike coming out of a parking lot (target fixation). It was really low speed so she didn’t get hurt at all and the bike didn't suffer any major damage, minor scrapes on the bar-ends and frame sliders.

She "says" she feels confident but from my point of view, she isn't. She wants to start riding for real but I am still concerned about her skill level.

What I would like to do is pickup some of those cones they used for the MSF course and setup a practice course some what like the MSF did for working on her basic skills on her new bike. Anyone know where I can buy some?


Some of the things I have been wondering about and would like to ask the advice of you ladies out there:

1) When you were learning to ride, what obstacles/challenges did you overcome to become the rider you are today?
Skills, techniques you had to work on the most and what helped you deal with them.

2) Did you feel better riding with your husband/significant other or with other people?
I feel that it might be better for someone else to act as a mentor for her while she is still learning. I have a feeling she might take instruction better from someone else.

3) Do you prefer riding with other woman or with your S.O.?


4) Are there any schools that pickup where MSF left off?
MSF is great for theory but you never go over 15mph or so in a parking lot and does not quite equate into street riding.

5) Like I said, my wife is short and “curvy” and I’m trying to find some suitable riding pants for her with her short legs and curvy hips. Who makes good safety equipment for someone who does not fit into the stereotypical size 4 dress? Would leather chaps suffice?



Any advice you gals can give me would be appreciated! Any tips or suggestions that you can give to help me make sure that I can bring my wife up to speed in a safe enjoyable manner.

Thanks in advance!
First, big kudos to you for checking in with the women on this one.

I too learned to ride a few years ago in the MSF course on the Honda 250 and got a Monster (900) as my first bike. I am a little taller than your wife (5'7") so I did not need to alter the ride height.

One thing that can contribute to confidence in a new rider is having the ability to plant both feet flat on the ground. I have a couple of girlfriends that got around this issue by getting a lug sole installed on their riding boots to increase their reach to the ground. This will make the bike feel more stable.

One of the things that was tricky for me was go from manuevering the little 250 in the MSF course to controlling the 400lbs of my 900. I think the only way around that is practice, practice, practice on a safe course. One of the things that helped me immensely with the bike was having a history of racing bicycles. I had already mastered 2 skinny wheels, so picking up the "big" bike was a natural. Most pros train on bicycles, so if your wife is amenable to that, it would be a big help with her fitness and handling skills.

It can very difficult to ride with one's significant other because of the ongoing relationship. If you are significantly more experienced, it can be nerve-wracking for both of you. (Believe me on this one, my S.O. is racer that has been riding >40 years) I liked riding in small groups with experienced friends (including the SO) where I could get a lot of support and helpful tips. I was also fortunate to be mentored by a very skilled female rider as well, which was a huge boost to my skills and comfort level. You are wise to mention this. I think it nearly always works better to have a mentor that is not your S.O., especially while you are first learning.

I like riding with my S.O., or more agressive female riders. I am used to engaging is sports with men, so I'm comfortable there. Some women prefer to ride with other women. It just depends on the person.

MSF offers an "Experienced Rider Course" that might be helpful. If you think it is safe, it may be good for your wife to ride around a little in controlled area so she is comfortable with the bike and the controls before taking another course.

I, too do not fit into a stereotypical size and have had luck with Alpinestars gear as far as fit goes. I don't mean to promote any manufacturer in particular, but that has worked for me. I also had my leather pants altered a bit by a local leathers company to make them more comfortable. I would not be comfortable in chaps, because I don't want the skin taken off my behind when I go down. :)

If you have a large gear retailer in your area, it would be a good idea for your wife to go and try on every set of gear she can to find what is a good fit. If she is comfortable in her gear, she'll be more confident. I tend to wear 2-piece leathers all year because of the abrasion resistance. I don't have a lot of confidence in textile gear.

The only tip I can give you for bringing your wife up to speed is to be very, very patient. It may be bumpy for a bit and then things will just start to gel. If she is really committed to it, she'll put in the saddle time. I think encouraging her to get a smaller bike was the right thing to do, but I know how stubborn women can be! With any luck and a lot of perservernce, she'll grow into the Monster. I knew I was good with mine when it reached the point that it was as easy to handle as the little 250. So in addition to being patient, be honest too-- her safety is a big concern to you, so deliver you worries about her skills with kindness and it should work out. Best of luck to both of you.
 

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I'm not a lady, but will respond.
Having watched my wife go from complete novice to decent road rider in 3 1/2 years, I can agree completely with the above post. Getting both feet flat on the floor is the biggest single reassurance to learning to ride. We got her a Kawasaki ninja 250, and it was a brilliant bike. Significant others can be good or bad teachers, irrespective of their own riding skills.

Lowering the bike affects handling, and not for the better, so problems with seat height aren't always best resolved by lowering the bike. You can always return to the 620 in a year, where seat height might not be such a problem with her improved skills and confidence.

All beginning rider problems normally happen at very low speed, so weight and power are their worst enemy. I would say that getting her to ride a bicycle as much as possible will help lessen the "looking down" syndrome and overall balance. The original post did not mention her cycling. Get the best protective gear you can afford.

As for her hell bent on getting a sport bike, well, she has now learned that just because we want and can afford to ride better machines doesn't mean it's time too, yet. Our egos take a very big battering when we drop a bike.
Above all, we want our partners to be safe and enjoy the experience, not terrified and exposed to unnecessary risk during their first year of riding.

Get her a 2-3 yr old 250 (and/or) or spend some time on a small dirt bike. She will love the 620 more for it. Ride that 250 all the time when safe to do so, not just at weekends or when the weather is nice. Avoid rush hour, heavy traffic, and night time.

Patience and acceptance of different abilities and limitations are key to riding together, but if managed well will result in unique experiences both shared and enjoyed. Seeing your partner develop as a rider is a very rewarding experience, but not always stress-free!

Best wishes to both of you.
 

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my wife has a 696. she has just spent a year riding a kawasaki ninja 250.

i'm sorry, but it sounds your wife needs to gain some confidence on two wheels, which is why they use 250's at MSF courses. motorcycling is a bit like taking up rock climbing. you wouldn't climb a big rock until you had experience on lesser climbs. a 620 monster is a big rock if you can't control it.

remove the fear of the machine and allow her bike skills to develop. your wife can ride the 620 for the next 2 years, but she won't be as good a rider and exhibit the same levels of confidence as if she spent a year on a smaller 250 bike.

when she can go on a ride and not look down every time she comes to a stop sign, she will have learned something about her and the bike. a bigger engine just presents more challenges - the very last thing a new'beginning rider needs.

i started off on a horrific old honda 175, and in retrospect, i wish i'd spent a year on a 125.

one person's concept of safe is irrelevant to another without the same experience.like you, i took the MSF course with my wife and i found it very helpful and made it less intimidating for my wife. this is something i highly recommend all partners doing together.

finally, get out and ride every day in all weathers when safe to do so. riding just on weekends is a recipe for not learning or acquiring new skills.

10,000 miles later, she will be a totally different motorcyclist and she will have moved on from the 250. and she probably won't be as likely to drop a ducati coming out of a parking lot.

as you can tell, i am totally against new riders having a ducati as their first bike.
just because we want something doesn't mean we should have it.

best of luck to both of you and your riding adventures. it really is a great way to spend time with your partner.
+1

My wife has the exact same story, 1 year on a Ninja 250, and recently got a Monster.

She loved the 250....she wouldn't get on the highway with it, but we hit all the back country roads around Austin all the time, and she really enjoyed it. Shoot I loved the hell out of that little light bike too. The grerat thing about those 250's are you can carry a lot of speed through the corners, which really builds confidence in leaning the bike.

Now shes got a 98 M750, and her only complaint about the 250(getting blown around by the wind) is gone. And one of the first things she said was "Wow, first and second gears are so much fun!"

I'm not saying your wife can't learn on the Monster, but I think a 250 would really help build confidence.
 

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I think a lot comes down to where you live. I'm paranoid, because we live in D.C. and for anyone who hasn't ridden a motorcycle in and around the metro area, I can only describe the combination of unsigned grooved roadworks, giant potholes, horrific driving skills, & the habitual running of red lights as 'educational' :)

The other big thing i'm into for new riders is to start acquiring some basic maintenance know-how with their bikes. It will connect rider and machine like no other activity, and lead to profound satisfaction because of honest individual accomplishment.
 

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Well, after getting tired of riding on the back of my bike, my wife decided she wanted to ride her own bike. I can't say I blame her, I'd rather not sit on the backside of a bike :p

Anyhow, I love her very much and I worry about her skills, size and physical ability on a bike.

I made her take the MSF course before I would let her try to ride a bike... I ended up taking the MSF course with her and found it to be a good learning experience.

During the course she rode a Honda Nighthawk 250 and liked the size but not the looks. I tried to convince her to get a 250 to learn on like a rebel or the nighthawk. Both are very light and easy to control. She was hell bent on getting a sport bike!.

2 days after completing the course she found a 02' Ducati Monster 620 Dark i.e. and made up her mind that it was the bike for her.

First on the agenda for me was making sure the bike was safe for her.

My Wife is about 5'1", curvy and has a short reach.

I have lowered the bike about as far as it will go and had the seat shaved. She can now get both balls of her feet down. I also installed some ASV adjustable levers (she could barely reach the clutch lever!) I also ordered some "city" handlebars for her but I'm still waiting for them.


After all of the modifications I rode it over to a large empty parking lot to let her practice on it. She was riding very slow and did ok. After hitting the parking lot session, I hopped on my bike and took her for her first ride on residential streets around our house. As I followed her I noticed that she seems very nervous and rides a little too slow (about 5-10mph BELOW the speed limit) and she dropped her bike coming out of a parking lot (target fixation). It was really low speed so she didn’t get hurt at all and the bike didn't suffer any major damage, minor scrapes on the bar-ends and frame sliders.

She "says" she feels confident but from my point of view, she isn't. She wants to start riding for real but I am still concerned about her skill level.

What I would like to do is pickup some of those cones they used for the MSF course and setup a practice course some what like the MSF did for working on her basic skills on her new bike. Anyone know where I can buy some?


Some of the things I have been wondering about and would like to ask the advice of you ladies out there:

1) When you were learning to ride, what obstacles/challenges did you overcome to become the rider you are today?
Skills, techniques you had to work on the most and what helped you deal with them.

2) Did you feel better riding with your husband/significant other or with other people?
I feel that it might be better for someone else to act as a mentor for her while she is still learning. I have a feeling she might take instruction better from someone else.

3) Do you prefer riding with other woman or with your S.O.?


4) Are there any schools that pickup where MSF left off?
MSF is great for theory but you never go over 15mph or so in a parking lot and does not quite equate into street riding.

5) Like I said, my wife is short and “curvy” and I’m trying to find some suitable riding pants for her with her short legs and curvy hips. Who makes good safety equipment for someone who does not fit into the stereotypical size 4 dress? Would leather chaps suffice?



Any advice you gals can give me would be appreciated! Any tips or suggestions that you can give to help me make sure that I can bring my wife up to speed in a safe enjoyable manner.

Thanks in advance!
Hi,
I am a female 42 years old I bought a 2012 monster 696 back in May. I started on a KLX250, and got very comfortable on that bike. I tried many bikes and the monster felt the most comfortable. I was nervous at first as well but rode with my husband and friends and they kept me in the middle protecting me from traffic. My biggest challenge was turns i googled a lot of info even learning how to jump start my bike when I drained the battery one day. One thing I found out by googling was the push turn. This really helped me get my turns down. I also just recently after asking my husband several times if I lean too far over when I turn will my bike fall over. He said no it sticks like glue this has given me much more confidence when making my turns now that I know I am not going to slide out. I feel more confident riding by myself than with my husband because he is always correcting me and I feel like I am always checking myself. I ride to work everyday so the more you ride the better as well. You can custom order any clothing or jackets on line adding or reducing the lengths of sleeves or pants. I hope some of this has helped.
Kathleen in Anaheim Hills, CA
 
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