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I've been lurking for a while on this board and others and I've chosen to phrase my question the way I did simply because it gets a lot of interesting responses. My background...I'm a complete newbie, I will take the MSF next month...I've been purchasing gear and already have my helmet, gloves and boots. I'm 40 years old(mid life crisis, yeah I know)....I love the way the bike looks and I love the "soul" description. I understand the feeling, I've got a steel Bianchi road bike and a Ti Litespeed, the Bianchi has soul...not so the Litespeed. I live in the Kansas City area and have a dealer within 25 miles of my home.

I've read about starting small and used, and don't necessarily have a problem with that...but I think that I am mature enough and capable to handle the 620...I've read that I may drop the bike incurring a 300 dollar bill to get the bike repaired...isn't this what I would lose buying a used bike and selling it? So...what do you say, why shouldn't this be my first bike?

Thanks for the input--btw--great board, the most mature and civil board about sportbikes I've seen!

gnew
 

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I agree, why shouldnt it!

Its a good first bike
 

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Why shouldn't a Monster 620 be your first bike?

The only two good reasons I can think of would be if you could get a new 800 or 1000 instead or buy a used 900.

There's nothing wrong with the 620 and it's got about the same hp as a M750 of a few years ago, but the resale is stronger on the larger displacement bikes.

Used Monsters can be a great deal right now. You can buy one and you have a good chance of it keeping its value, and if you buy from the right person, it can have less issues than a new one.

As for riding them, if you think that you have the maturity to handle a brand new Ducati as a first bike, then you probably have the maturity to control your right hand. The rideabillity of the bikes doesn't differ that much on the lower end, the larger bikes just have accesss to more top end.

HTH,
--Fillmore

ps- I like your steel framed Bianchi analogy (except that I did have a Litespeed Tachyon for a while that I really liked). If more people rode bikes and could go from a steel framed Bianchi or Ibis to an aluminum framed Trek or Cannondale, I think that they'd understand the "soul" thing better....
 
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The 620 was my first street bike. I had a 350 DR dual sport before. Very similar riding. I'm glad I started on that cuz I did drop it once and wiped out too. Both were minor and dumb "newbie" mistakes. ;)

Get the 620! I have one and I will keep it even when I get the 749 or a Brutale. ;D
 
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First of all there is no such thing as a mid life crises when you are 40. When a man is 40 he is king. Life does not get any better than when you are 40, I know I have been there, some years ago.

So to your question, which do not have an easy answer, but when you buy a bike always listen to your heart. I guess that is why many of us here have the Monster, it is no rational explanation it is only that feeling.

A lot of the people who buy the M620 are born again bikers, like my self, we want something special, not something you can find on every street corner.

Do not buy something small and used go for the M620, do not deny our self the pride and joy of buying a brand new Ducati, but do not be to mature when you ride it, let that little boy you have inside come out from time to time.

Happy riding

Slim
 

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My first street bike was a M750 and It was perfect starter bike (other than price of course). The smaller monsters have just the right amount of power IMHO for a starter (mature person). They have enough power to keep you interested and not too much to get in WAY over your head.

Keep in mind that most people will have a brain freeze and drop their bike in the first year, I did twice. Total damage for me was ~$30, but your mileage may vary... With no faring the moster does drop well (better than a crotch rocket).

In the end, my 2 cents is as follows, either get what you want now and live with the droping risk or get a cheap beater for 2K to ride for a year and sell it for close to what you paid for it... Maybe an old Suzi GS500 or something like it. In the end if you are going to spend more than a couple K you might as well get what you want! It is not like you are looking at a 999....
 

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Thanks for the input--btw--great board, the most mature and civil board about sportbikes I've seen!

gnew
DUDE, you must be missing Herbs posts. And mine for that matter.

oh yeah- there is a Denny's off of i-35 south of KC that sux. Dont eat there.

about the 620- get it. Isnt that what a mid life crisis is all about anyways?
 

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Well, since everybody said 'go for it', I'll play devil's advocate... [smiley=evil.gif]

It's common to drop your bike while starting or stopping when you are learning. No biggie, just a balance or clutch/throttle control thing.
If you're like me, you'll do it a couple times.

If you're on a beater like an older EX500 or GS500, you shrug and pick it up. If you're lucky it was already scraped on that side, and you dont even bother to fix it.

There's much more mental trauma when you drop your new monster.

ride your starter for a year, get the hang of it, then move up.
 

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Gnew,

I am fairly new to motorcycling myself and just bought a 620 back in August. I think it is a great bike for a first ride. But, I agree with Rev_Deadpan when he says you may want to look at a bigger bike. I'd look for an 800 or used 900 merely because you will get used to the power of the 620 and want more eventually. So you may as well start one notch up. And secondly the resale value is better on the bigger bikes.

Other than that I think the 620 is a great ride. I love mine. Eventhough I feel now I should have gotten an 800 I don't regret the 620. So what ever you decide you will be fine. Get a Monster!!!!

I also owned a Bianchi, and it did have soul. But not as much as my Colnago!

MWB
 
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What is all this about dropping the bike, it is not a common thing to do, I have not dropped my y2k M600 yet and I my riding mates they are no bike droppers either. Get real, our friend is 40, he is man. Real men do not drop bikes. It is only 176 kg.

Slim
 

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On the subject of wanting more bike, this is true, this will always be true. We always want to go faster, to have more power. I am a very firm believer that a rider should spend AT LEAST a year on a small displacement bike before moving up. Sure you could start on a bigger bike and you would get confident and start to push it, but the problem is that you have not learned how to push it yet. All the extra horsepower can get you inti trouble if you dont have the proper reactions ingrained in your brain. A 600cc motorcycle will go plenty fast, but most importantly it will give you room for error. To many young riders jump right on to liter bikes cause they figure they will grow into it. Sure enough in a couple of months they are feeling real confident and start to ride fast. Then youll find their bike in the salvage yard and it wont matter how many cc it was.


I have been riding for 15 yrs. and my first bike was a 250 I had it for 3yrs.
I now ride a 94 M900 with a 944 kit and FCRs
I am in the process of buying a new R1
 

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I am a very firm believer that a rider should spend AT LEAST a year on a small displacement bike before moving up... A 600cc motorcycle will go plenty fast, but most importantly it will give you room for error.
I'm inclined to agree, but I've seen a lot of people learn on CBR 600s and R6s, and a M900/1000 is a lot easier to ride than one of those and a little harder to get into trouble on...

So, I'm not saying that a M900 is the best bike first bike ever (that'd probably be an EX500 or GS500), but it's definitely in the realm of possibillities.

--Fillmore
 

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My 620 is my very first bike. Love every second of it..

I've had it since summer and have about 4700 miles on it. It was a new 2002 when i bought it.. got a good deal on it.

No regrets. Lots of pride.
 
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I agree with Fillmore... if you can handle a 620, you can handle a 750 or 800 or 900 or 1000.

Dropping a 620 will probably be just as expensive as dropping a 1000. I think newbie drops can be avoided with proper planning, caution, and technique.

The primary argument I have against starting your motorcycle life with a Ducati is on the mechanical side.

My m900 is the first motorcycle I have ever owned. I rode in college on the good will and generosity of others with motorcycles.

Since I do not have a strong mechanical background (just no experience) I have been very reluctant to learn on my lovely Ducati. Thus, I have shelled out an awful lot of money for relatively routine maintenence and adjustments. If I had started with an older, crummier bike, I would not have hesitated to dive right in and get comfortable with motorcycle maintenence without fear of mistakes.

For what it's worth, I am a life-long cyclist and I disagree with the characterization of Cannondale as a soulless bike. They are lovingly handcrafted American bikes that simply sing for me. I own a Cannondale road bike and tandem and love them just about as much as I love my Ducati. I also own a Trek mountain bike and care for it about as much as I would a Honda... in other words, I have fun riding it but it lacks poetry.

Associating Cannondale with Trek is like associating Red Hook with Budweiser.

Back to topic, if you want your first bike to be like that first love that you married and lived happily ever after with, go with a Monster - the more displacement the better. If you want your first bike to be like the girl you learned to kiss with in Junior High, get a used Honda.
 

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I'll tell you what my brother-in-law told me when I was ready to get my mew bike, mind you not my first bike, but, and I quote "Get as much bike as you can afford... You can always turn the throttle less, but can't turn it past the stop!".
 

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Motorcycling takes practice. When you are new, sh1t happens. Bikes fall, things get scratched, maintenance gets neglected, there's all sorts of things you don't know and don't think to ask.

Small, light, and CHEAP are the way to go. No reason not to start on a 600 except it is an expensive bike to mess up while you are learning. There are also more forgiving bikes out there that you could learn on.

Welcom to the world of bikes. You will be changed forever.

Doc
 

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Back to topic, if you want your first bike to be like that first love that you married and lived happily ever after with, go with a Monster - the more displacement the better. If you want your first bike to be like the girl you learned to kiss with in Junior High, get a used Honda.
This is friggin beautiful, man.
It needs to be saved forever in a FAQ somewhere...
 
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