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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at the oil level window, the oil looks kinda cloudy white. I'm going to do a full oil change tomorrow morning (filter, screen, Mobil1 15-50).

I'm just curious as to what makes oil do this. Is it from water in the oil? Some other contaminant?

TIA

dj
 
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Its water (condensation), give the bike a good hard run and burn it all out ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ah you tease me because you know I am working ;)

I'll change the oil tomorrow morning and take her for a 'test ride'... Should take about 200mi to fully clean it out right? ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just goes to show why you should always scour the net before posting your question. From ducati.net:

The oil in my inspection window is milky? Why?
submitted by Jason Tucker

If you're referring to the old "milky sight glass syndrome", the best way to get rid of it is to go for a ride. The white, milky film is caused by water condensation. Short rides in cold weather will cause this. Go for a nice long ride that gets the engine temp up and the film should go away
 

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If you see the white film that means you are not giving your lady enough "quality time". Get on her and get her nice and hot. Run her through the gears, tease her with the throttle hand. Go out and buy her something nice. Then let this be a lesson to you.
 

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It makes a difference which type of oil you have in the bike. I don't have the problem of milkyness in the oil when I've used a good synthetic or semisynthetic, but I used Castrol Actevo motorcycle oil last winter and had a bad case of oil milkyness. Long rides weren't enough to make it go away either.

Switching to a semisynthetic cleared it right up.

Anyway, riding the bike in cold weather (we're talking California cold here, like 50 degrees) makes it happen and riding it in really hot weather makes it go away. The type of oil you use has a big effect on the chances of having the problem.

I'll let you all know about the end of January if I see any milkyness in the oil this time around.
 

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I dunno 'bout y'all, but if I saw milky white oil in my window, I'd drop some out of the crankcase into an oil pan and see if I've got a contamination problem before riding...

But then again mine's water cooled. As for you air-cooled folks, your probably right it's just a little condensation around the window. In that case it's the Duc's way of saying "take me for a real ride, you pansy" ;D

Congrat's on the new mount. You're gonna luv it.
 
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Scott, that's interesting about the ACTEVO. Thats all I've used in my M1000 for the last 2 oil changes and 4000 miles or so. My results have been good, with no milky sight glass. Every morning my ride in to work , 40 miles, starts in the low 40's to mid 50's F. Afternoon ride is 90-100F. No milk ever! Maybe my late model lean calibration and 40 mile trip is enough to keep things right. I believe that oil must run 180F or there abouts minimum to keep the water away. This is no problem with my routine.
Mike
 

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If I rode 40 miles every time I got on the bike, I'm sure I would never see any milkyness in the oil even in winter. I'm more likely to take a bunch of 2-5 mile trips with a few 30-100 mile trips thrown in occasionally. When the temperature is in the 30's my bike never warms up completely, but I try to avoid temperatures that low, since I can usually wait until the afternoon for decente temperatures any time of year.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the info guys. I appreciate it.

So, one thing I did find out is that it's damn difficult to check your oil level when the window is milky... but I was barely able to make out a darker section that must be the oil I just added just under the Full line. I'm keeping a close eye on it and carrying a bottle of oil in my pack just to be safe.

I changed the oil (replaced with Mobil 1 15w50), oil filter (oem), cleaned the screen, and replaced both crush washers.

Took the girl out for a ride during my lunch break today and put a little over 40 miles on her. It was a beautiful hot sunny day here. Did about 50/50 freeway and street driving. I thought for sure the milkyness would be gone when I got back to work, but nope, still there.

Any ideas? A longer ride perhaps? Hey, any reason to bail out of the office for a nice long ride on a sunny day. ;)
 

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when you come back from your 40 mile ride today, remove the oil filler plug for a few minutes. this will allow some of the water vapor to escape.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ahh! Good idea Howie. I'll give that a try.

Unfortunatly, I had to drive the Vanagon today, as I remembered I needed to ship some packages. Ah well. There's always tomorrow..
 
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