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I just wonder how many posters have started on a 200-300. Then gone to 500-600 and then gone to the liter.

My guess is less than half. That sounds really nice and all but passion drives a lot of choice and we all didnt end up bad riders or worse off for going a little bigger.

I'm not so worried about someone who buys a 620 as a first bike or an 821 or 1100 as a second bike. I'm more worried about the guy who buys a Panigale or Hyabusa or R1 within a year of starting to ride.
Well, yes, many (if not most) people haven't done it the smartest way. That doesn't make it the right answer to not start the smartest way. That's why experienced people like me bother to speak up and promote the idea of starting the smartest way.

I started on a Honda 350, and then spent about 6 years on various scooters (160cc to 275cc) and small bikes (250cc to 450cc) before buying my Monster M900.
My wife and daughter both started on a Honda 250; my daughter is now on a Vespa 200, and my wife has an M900 Monster (she spent 2 years on the 250, and is making the transition very carefully). They both took the riding course before licensing. We all wear full gear all the time (minimum full helmet, leather jacket, good gloves and boots).

I advocate being smart about risky activities.

PhilB
 

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First bike was a Monster 900 but i live in the Netherlands and we have to take lessons and perform exams to receive a drivers license.
to give you an example, the exam contains special manoeuvres like slow slalom, sudden stop, parking, dodging with 35Mph etc. etc.
on average we take about 20 hours in lessons (street / parkinglot).
So in total 3 exams.
- Theoretical
- Special manoeuvres
- Street exam (1 hour drive)

Here some examples regarding the special manouvres.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkwhoVuoxdo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXdsnWAIZQQ

I do not recommend a M900 as a first bike without serieus training or lessons! I have been driving for 4 years now and it sometimes still suprises me..if you make a mistake regarding the throttle or steering a 900 is not so forgiving as an 600 or less.
 

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I concur with the largest segment of this post; start with something that is fairly small (my first bike was a 1994 Suzuki GS500E) and used; mechanically sound, but has some small cosmetic issues. There are two kinds of [new] riders; those that have dropped their bike, and those that will. EVERYone drops their first bike, and no matter how old and beat up it was, you still cry.

Folks will mention the "need" for higher power bikes, but it just isn't so. Anyone can twist a throttle and go fast; having to really learn how to maneuver a bike without simply powering through things will make you a skillful and much better rider; don't be fast, be quick.

Once you've spent a solid year or more with your first bike (this assumes you are a full-time rider) and you feel like you've gotten everything you can out of it, you'll be ready to hand it off to someone that's more skillful, whom will show you that you have only just begun to learn. Ride their line, feel humbled, and then go get something that makes you happier.
 

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All the links in the first post appear to be broken. They all take me to the forums main page.
Those links are ten years old. The things they linked to are very unlikely to be there anymore.

PhilB
 

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Myself I chose the 1200R as the seat is a little higher than the S. That's probably the main reason that sold me to the R as I don't think I would have liked the lower seating position of the S.
 
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