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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been watching this vid

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6656191590638402466

and I'm trying to do the basic power wheelie. Keeping it in first gear and rolling on the throttle. It gets up to about 8000 rpm and then it sort of feels like it's cutting out - is that a rev limiter? I haven't been able to get the wheel up yet. My main concern obviously is not dropping it. I have a 14t so it should be easy. I just need to roll on a bit quicker do you think?
 

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It sounds like you're hitting the flat spot in the powerband at 8K.

Did you check the wheelie FAQ? There's also a good video on the sportbike rider website.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thx. I read the FAQ.

One thing about that instructional video i linked above is they're doing it on 4 cylinder liter bikes and just rolling on the throttle is all they need. But with my monster I wondered if I might need quicker throttle application.

So the guy in the FAQ is saying take it to the middle of the powerband, maybe 3-4K, then at once fully open the throttle! I don't think I've even had my throttle fully open yet. Does it sound right? Any more tips?
 

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With your bike a gentle rolling on of the throttle is not going to bring the front end up. A quicker pinning of it might, but I have not ridden an 800 s2r so I can't tell you.

From your posts so far though, I can say that you might want to become more accustom to the bike before the wheelies. Know where the rev limiter is. Know what wide open throttle feels like (where your hnd and wrist are) (you mentioned you don't know if you've had it wide open).

Have fun.

C
 

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My old 800 could power wheelie in first with stock gearing. You have to get it right at the bottom of the power band, say 5000 rpm. Then shift you weight back in the seat a bit and squeez the tank with your knees. You need to goose the throttle pretty quick and tug the bars to help it up. Practice somewhere where you will not get ran over should things go wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's not that I'm so interested in doing wheelies, more that I want to know what it feels like to have the wheel come up and know that I can control it if it happens. I've unintentially wheelied a dirt bike before and dropped it but that was no big deal. The monster's another matter. I'm having a new flywheel put on in a couple of days which should help with the power wheelie. I know slipping the clutch will get it up more easily. I've seen one guy do effortless wheelies on a stock standard S2R 800 so I know the bike is well capable of it. I'm in no hurry really.
 

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I have never found unintentional wheelies to be a problem. The front end just comes up gently and slowly leaving plenty of time to moderate your throttle input. I can't imagine anyone looping an 800 in an unintentional wheelie.

Also, the power wheelie is (as you've observed) not the kind you're going to experience unintentionally. It's the clutch wheelie that always sneaks up on me. It's happened lots of times; I brake for a light or traffic, then drop the clutch and accelerate for a quick getaway. Next thing I know, the front wheel's waving in the air ;D

So, frankly, working on your power wheelies, per se, won't give you the experience you're looking for.
 

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I'm no expert, but I do have an S2R 800 w/ stock sprockets and have been messing around with wheelies too. Not to know how to cope w/ unintentional ones, but more because I'd just like to be able to do them. I' first learned to ride wheelies on dirt bikes, but until recently never tried them on a road bike.

I've found that my S2R doesn't raise the front wheel by simply rolling on the throttle (even aggressively). I haven't tried slipping the clutch as shown in the video, but what I've been doing is while in first gear running the rpm up to about 5500-6000 rpm and backing off the throttle quickly so weight shifts forward to somewhat compress the front shocks. Once the rpm drops to between 3500-4000 and front shocks compress then I fairly aggressively crack open the throttle. The front wheel definitely comes up.

As the video and previous posts suggest, I always make sure I have a large expanse of pavement without any traffic or obstructions. Also, I strongly suggest being conservative in terms of how aggressively you twist open the throttle after compressing the front end.

I haven't always exercised good judgement, but in the case of aggressive riding and doing wheelies it's a matter of risk and reward to me. I try to remind and ask myself if the risk of laying down my bike or getting hurt worth the thrill of riding a wheelie or for showing off. Probably not.
 

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An 800 will easily do a power wheelie without chopping the throttle - but you'll have to use your body a little bit.

From a stop, accelerate steadily up to about 3500 rpms, then open the throttle positively and at the same time shift your weight back. Go slowly, you can actually whip the front end up of a relatively low power bike pretty quickly if you time everything perfect.

Go slow, give yourself space.

I doubt you will ever unintentionally power wheelie your bike in anything other than a drag start, but even if you do coming out of a corner or something, it's gentle enough that keeping looking where you are going and slightly rolling off will put the wheel back down and keep you headed in the right direction.
 

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b.h. said:
Lesson 1: How to do a power wheelie

Lesson 2: How to save a tank slapper

Lesson 3: Insurance wants to total my bike, what should I do?

;D
I don't think its near as big of a concern as this makes it out to be. Wheelies are fun and with some caution a real piece of cake. Proposing that this guy is going to go into a tank slapper and total his ride is not only nonsense but you are raining on his and many other's parade.

To OP, take it slow and have fun. I learned on a dirt bike where if it falls over or what not, nothing big happens to either the bike or the rider. If you have a dirt bike, that's how I'd begin and move to the Monster, but that's just my thoughts, many will disagree.
 

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ATO Memphis said:
I learned on a dirt bike where if it falls over or what not, nothing big happens to either the bike or the rider. If you have a dirt bike, that's how I'd begin and move to the Monster, but that's just my thoughts, many will disagree.
that's basically my opinion too. unfortunately I chose to express it in a less helpful manner :)

But if you don't know what you're doing, a little wheelie can quickly turn into big trouble. If you have to ask how to do a wheelie, you probably also haven't mastered many of the other skills that are needed to do a wheelie safely (throttle control, balance, braking, ability to react if something does go wrong....)

you see a lot of newbies that get a new bike, learn the bare basics, and immediately start trying to pop the front up before really gaining any real riding skills whatsoever. monsters don't come with a steering damper. what's gonna happen the first time he gets it right, and the front starts to come up quickly under power, dude gets scared and panics, chops the throttle, and lands crossed up? hopefully just a little headshake, but could be much worse.
 

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****, i've never done a wheelie.

why? because sometimes when i do dumb stuff, i end up with a repair bill. [laugh]

but if i had a cheap beater dirt bike, say with a set of road tires slapped on it... well, what do you suppose the mall cops at my apartment complex would do about midnight parking lot wheelies? ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
b.h. said:
But if you don't know what you're doing, a little wheelie can quickly turn into big trouble. If you have to ask how to do a wheelie, you probably also haven't mastered many of the other skills that are needed to do a wheelie safely (throttle control, balance, braking, ability to react if something does go wrong....)
Yeah that's true. I have a lot yet to learn. You've convinced me. I'll leave off the wheelies until I'm a better rider.
 

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b.h. said:
<snip>

But if you don't know what you're doing, a little wheelie can quickly turn into big trouble. If you have to ask how to do a wheelie, you probably also haven't mastered many of the other skills that are needed to do a wheelie safely (throttle control, balance, braking, ability to react if something does go wrong....)

<snip>
Good points. That's where just waiting for the unintentional wheelies come on their own might be a good idea. By the time you're comfortable riding aggressively enough to get the front end light in normal riding, presumably you've developed some of the bike handling skills needed to comfortably ride it out.
 

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The S2R is an amazing wheel stand hooligan tool that I have experienced!.
The best way to wheelie the Red Devil is to rock the throttle and flat shift to second. Result is an endless wheelie for miles.
Here is a break down of how it happens.
1) from take off take the bike up to aprrox 4000rpm in first, about 40kmph
This can be slow if you like, as long as the bike hits around 4000rpm
before step 2
2) The next step is called rocking the throttle. at 4000rpm close the throtle
sharp ond open the throttle about half to three quarter with speed, if you
have done this, the wheel should be in the air. Be aware that once the
wheel is up, if you close the throttle fast your wheel will return to the
road with speed, and could damage your suspension.
3) Once your wheel is up, to maintain the wheelie, you will have to
speed the bike up to a terminal velocity where the bike will maintain its
wheel stand. bring the revs up to about 6ooorpm and then flick the
shifter into 2nd gear without the clutch and maintaining throttle position.
4) maintain wheelie with the throttle.
 

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i learned to power wheelie on my old monster900, good tips you have here.
dont want to confuse you some more, just have some suggestions though.
1) its always safer to have a steering damper.
2) try practising monos alone or with a mate who wouldnt pressure you or egg you on
a lil too much. preferably in an isolated area with no traffic and a long enough tarmac. and forget
vidoes first.
3) once you get a pop, relax and breathe. most crashes happen with a lil too much adrenaline. try again
only when youre in full control and not too giddy.
good luck with the monos buddy and watch out for oil coming out of the engine and the fork seals [thumbsup]
 

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Is the suspension on the S2R so weak that coming down hard will break it?? Also, coming from a GSXR-750 and a steering damper, will it be that bad? I know R1s suck without them, but I guess I will have to get one for my S2R. I don't want more problems. I have too many of my own to worry about!
 

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i really dont want to try and perfect wheelies on my monster. Is there a good beater bike thats under 1500 bucks i can pick up where i can learn to wheelie on (and everything else such as stoppies n such)
 

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A buddy and I used to beat the tar out of an old cbr 600 which was great for wheelies and stoppies, and Nobody cared when we dumped it. LOL
 
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