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For the S2R 1000 owners out there. (I imagine 800 too).
What octane gas do you use?

I know my bike has always run the cheap stuff, and I changed over to ethanol free, but I noticed in the manual that they recommend a gas of "at least 95 octane" according to the manual.

I've often read that a higher octane will cause a faster build up of deposits.. So which is it?
Am I starving my engine? Would I see any difference?

Thanks.

Rob.
 

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Check the fuel post on the main forum. The 95 octane is the euro rating and is equivalent to regular in the US. That being said, I try to only run ethanol free in mine which is normally 90 octane.
 

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Check the fuel post on the main forum. The 95 octane is the euro rating and is equivalent to regular in the US. That being said, I try to only run ethanol free in mine which is normally 90 octane.
Thanks for that. Nice to know.

I once had a weird time with my old Subaru WRX the dealer said would be fine on regular, and it slowly started to slow..
I put in some premium and by the 1st 1/4 tank it was absolutely blasting around again. I think that has always stuck with me.

Later on though, I experimented with higher octanes in more regular (less compression) engines and found that it runs absolutely no differently on higher, at least for the tank.. I imagine it would seriously soot up the works if I kept on doing it.

Rob.
 

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I use the highest octane available at the pump I am at. That usually ranges from 91 to 94 octane
 

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Thanks for that. Nice to know.

I once had a weird time with my old Subaru WRX the dealer said would be fine on regular, and it slowly started to slow..
I put in some premium and by the 1st 1/4 tank it was absolutely blasting around again. I think that has always stuck with me.

Later on though, I experimented with higher octanes in more regular (less compression) engines and found that it runs absolutely no differently on higher, at least for the tank.. I imagine it would seriously soot up the works if I kept on doing it.

Rob.
Any modern auto engine with knock sensors will respond this way, and much MUCH more so in a turbocharged engine. On crap gas your WRX Subi ecu will cut boost, retard timing, and/or enrichen the mix, making it even easier than usual for my GTI to spank it.
In my S2R1000, there is a noticeable difference between ethanol and non-ethanol fuel in the same octane. Interestingly, oil temps do decrease slightly with ethanol containing fuels, but so does performance. I can now get 91 octane ethanol free fuel at the pump locally for the first time in a decade, and the results have been more dramatic than expected. Plus--no more swollen tank! [thumbsup]
 

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For the S2R 1000 owners out there. (I imagine 800 too).
What octane gas do you use?

I know my bike has always run the cheap stuff, and I changed over to ethanol free, but I noticed in the manual that they recommend a gas of "at least 95 octane" according to the manual.

I've often read that a higher octane will cause a faster build up of deposits.. So which is it?
Am I starving my engine? Would I see any difference?

Thanks.

Rob.

Man just pour in some Sta-Bil every 2000 miles and the bike will be fine. Quit worrying over nothing.
 

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The short answer: use the lowest octane the engine is happiest with.

Use a higher octane and there will be residue leftover which will accumulate on your head and pistons.

How do you measure "happiest with"? If you can't notice by riding (like obvious change in power or hearing pinging), the next best indicator is fuel consumption on a repeatable trip. Think commuting or a particular loop you ride on the weekends. You'll want to use the octane fuel which results in the best economy.

With any new gasoline powered vehicle, I recommend doing the tests in order from lowest octane to highest. Octane can be considered a contaminant which restricts how easily gasoline burns. So switching from 91 to 87 might effectively behave like 90 for a couple of fuel tanks.

I previously believed the usual wives' tales on the internet (some are reinforced above) but one specific case cemented my opinions: a moving van. a 24 foot Penske van was rented to move someone across the country. I was a part of that journey. The van had a 20 gallon tank and a 455 cid engine. It got 4.2 or so mpg and it really sucked having to stop every 80 miles to fill up. I recall it was $2 for 87 octane. I tried 89 for ten cents more and it resulted in 5 mpg: a 25% gain in economy and range for 5% increase in cost of a fill up. That just made the journey 20% less costly. Then we tried 91 octane and got the same gain again: 6 mpg for another 10 cents per gallon. A 50% gain in economy for 10% increase in cost of a tank of gas. Maybe we could tell a difference in performance on 91 vs 87... maybe 55 mph only took 7 minutes instead of 5??

:D

:D Chris
 
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