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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Still a newbie. I am sure this is a topic that has been thrown around for years. Here is my dilema.

Just got the monster with 12k miles. The dealer did the 12k tune up with valaves, belts etc. No problem.

But, In about 2 years I am moving to Costa Rica. I have never seen a Duc there and doubt there is a duc Mechanic. Is the valve/belt work really all that complicated?? Can I teach myself or should I trade it for an inline 4 before I move?

I would hate to sell her...But i don't want to break her either.

-Dan
 

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Make that two newbies.
I am not scared to turn a wrench, I do all the maintainence on my vehicles and boats, but have never messed with valve adjustments. I can rebuild a motor with no manual but I'm sketchy about these desmos.

Somebody shed a little light on this please.
 
G

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if ya got a computer then you got the DML in your back pocket there are some good wrenches on the list....and the 2V's and belts should be fine for you to adjust yourself.
There is the Haynes manual and the Ducati Manual to grab plus the sponsors here and all the people on the list, enjoy the island life :)
 

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Even though I grew up building/repairing just about everything I drove, I was also a little intimidated at the prospect of going into the valves and belts.

The first time I was very methodical and cross checked every step between the Haynes manual, ducatitech.com, and another site who's url escapes me right now. By the time I was done I felt very comfortable that the valves were exactly right. The second time I was methodical and careful, and a lot quicker. Once you do it and see how everything goes, you really come to appreciate the desmo design. Once you get familiar with the parts and procedure, the hardest part is the math as you take the measurements, compare them to specs, and if needed calculate replacement shim thickness.

Tip: Write down everything you measure neatly and in a consistent format. Keep it all with your maintenance records to refer back to and establish trends in valve clearances. Having the thickness of the shims currently installed written down will help you next time to quickly identify a shim that may work on a different valve if it's coming off of its current location.

Belts are pretty straightforward. For 2V engines, the spring scale substitute for the Ducati tension tool as described in Haynes works just fine after you bend up a hook that will stay on the roller bearing while you pull it to the required tension.

For me, not only is the reward a significant savings in labor cost, but the peace of mind I get from knowing everything in there is "right".
 

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You can do valves and belts at home with no real problems...

I've done valves 1x so far... Chris Ice helped me out with the first time... 2nd time I could probably do it myself.

Valves: suggestion - get the VHS video on valve adj. (forgot who carries it). Also you'll need minimum - engine-turning tool, feeler gauges, electronic carb balancing meter (if your bike is carbed), a shim kit ($200), basic tools (allen wrenches, etc), magnetic telescoping baton, fine sandpaper (if you need to resize a shim if your shim kit doesn't have a correct size), one of those engineering rulers (has a dial on it), a calculator, anti-seize. Ducatisuite? has some good info on valve adj.

Belts: buy 1 - 2 sets of belts... Ducatisuite has instructions on belt adj/replacement.

Daffe
 

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Daffe makes a good point about the $200 shim kit for when you move to CR. As long as you have access to a dealer here with a decent parts guy, you can just go in with a list of the shims you need and the same micrometer you measured yours with. Actually measure the new shims before buying, as they aren't all really what the lable on the bin says they are :eek: My parts guy just brings out the whole shim kit and sets it on the counter while I check through the shims to get the one closest to the spec I need. Once you move, the kit will probably be worthwhile. And if you ever get out of the Duc business, you should be able to sell the shim kit without too much loss.

You can actually skip the engine turning tool. I put the bike on the rear stand and shift it into about 5th gear. Take the spark plugs out. Then I can sit on the floor and watch the TDC marks through the sight glass while turning the rear wheel/engine with my right hand.
 

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hey Mark! That's a great idea as far as engine-turning it...

I think I still have the business card of the guy who has the shimkits for $200. He makes them and we checked the shim sizes with one of those engineer rulers... dead-on for sizes.

actually, found the URL for the shim guy... it's EMS

we used the "pull the plugs and listen for the air" technique as well.
 

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I live in Idaho...anyone know how to do valves? I would like to learn this procedure too.

Also there used to be a java script online that would calc the shim sizes. If anyone has the formulas I could try to write one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok. I took your advice and called proitalia.com. I told them I was new and asked if it took me through all of the steps beginning to end. They said the Video just Covered the Valve adjust part and If I didn't know how to get there...Then to go to a Mechanic. They greatly advised againt it unless I am a mechanic. Also, I can't find a haynes manual for '96 and newer. I think I am going to pay someone and ask to watch. Then get the video and the book so I can havesome idea as to what is going on.
 
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i don't think a haynes manual post 96 exsists, but the one for 2 valves up to 96 will work fine.. is the 2000 dark efi? that would be the only major difference..
 

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DuckyDan...

it's NOT that difficult... watch the video several times before trying it though. You have to be sure that you have all the proper tools...

feeler gauges, telescoping magnetic baton (small one), anti-seize paste (for when you put the spark plugs back on), shim kit, engineer's measurement tool (calipers w/a dial to measure shim distance, etc), socket (forgot which size) to remove spark plugs, allen wrenches, shim measurement tool (to measure depth of the top shim)... are you in California at all?
 
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