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Discussion Starter #1
A while ago when I changed my belts, I found it really hard to turn the engine over by hand, I'd get to about TDC and it'd get really hard, then it would sorta spring through the hard bit and get easy again. With the belts off, I still couldn't rotate the cam pulleys all the way around by hand (felt the same). Whats the go with that? Is it normal?? I'm about to do my valves and I don't know how I can check for binding if it's like this!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
**** yeah forgot to mention that. Had the plugs out, and I was rotating it via the back wheel. It was still super hard when i was rotating the cam pulleys by hand.
 

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well, first off, you haven't set off any alarms in my head from your original post. that springing around part is normal, you have to overcome the closer spring at some point and when you do, it springs around. If you had a dead stop at some point in the rotation, I'd be concerned...

it's going to be a lot harder to spin the cam pulleys by hand directly for sure, and I would suggest you invest in a crank tool if you plan on doing continued work on the bike, it's a lot easier to turn the engine in neutral from the crank rather than dealing with the rear wheel...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awesome thanks hiero. Its definately a springing and not a dead stop. That turning tool sounds like a good idea.
 

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The turning tool would be handiest, but you can also just use the proper sized bolt threaded into the end of the crank, locked with a jamb nut and washer. Turn with a wrench or ratchet by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Monsta that would be awesome!! I'm gonna go in to some shops today to find out prices for shims and a chain and sprockets. Once I've got that sorted I'll hit you up for that stuff. Thanks heaps! You should patent that thing before someone else does!
 

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More tips and tricks:

When turning the motor with the rear wheel, put it in 5th or 6th gear. Gives you more mechanical advantage against the crankshaft.

Only turn the motor in the direction it runs. If you turn it the other way, the starter sprag engages and you are now turning the motor's resistance plus the starter motor and its gearing is working against you.

And one I discovered recently - On a dry clutch bike you can pull the clutch cover and easily turn the motor with the clutch pressure plate and your bare hand ( if the spark plugs are out). Remember the clutch (like the cams) rotate in the opposite direction of the motor/crankshaft. It was this technique that also clued me in about the starter engaging if you try to turn the motor backwards.
 
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