Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts
U

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had (am having) a midlife crisis, and wanted a motorcycle. Did a lot of research and went to a lot of showrooms. Was unable to resist the Monsters, so I bought a Monster 800. Took the MSF course, and after I passed, one of the instructors asked me if I thought I was ready for the Ducati. I said I thought I'd be practicing in parking lots for a LONG time, but eventually would take it out on the road when I felt comfortable. He said he thought it was "way too much bike for a first time rider." and recommended that I buy a small used bike and practice for a year before I tried it. What now? It's getting delivered the day after tomorrow. Is he right? I live in Colorado, so there are plenty of places to practice and learn the feel of the bike (and proper respect) with little or no traffic, but now I'm wondering if in my midlife crisis wasn't a little too extreme. Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I did the MSF course in Seattle in October, and bought a bike a month later - Monster 900, without any prior riding experience except as a kid on dirtbikes. The sales guy said that as long as you have respect for it and its performance, he has had no trouble starting people off on a 900.

Of course he would say that wouldn't he, but he was absolutely right. I am 28 and I consider myself sensible enough now to understand the real risks of driving and riding, and don't think I am imortal like my behaviour in my youth may have suggested ;)

I started riding on the road immediately (maybe I am still a bit of a risk taker) but had no problems just taking it carefully, which the machine lets you do. If you are starting in car parks and stuff, you will find that you quickly get the feel of the bike and its performance. I think if you passed the course and yo have the right attitude, you'll have no problem with the Monster 800 :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
838 Posts
My first motorcycle EVER is this one I have... and its a 750. I'm 23yrs old.. and have been riding BMX bikes in both racing and Flatland, so I do have good control of two wheeled vehicles...

I also got on the road immediately... and I havent looked back since....

The 750 is not all that fast, and I really wish I bought a more powerful bike. *COUGH S4 COUGH*

If you drive it wisely.. you will have no issues...

Keep the 800... in a few months you'll wish you got a bigger one instead.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
75 Posts
Hi I for the same reasons resorted to a motorcycle to regain my misspent youth. Kids arranged a Harley trike ride for fathers day very tame but hooked. tested many bikes and ended up buying an S4. Had'nt ridden a bike for 20 years but had many early on when young and sillier. Now 2 years on and couple of low speed gutsers later one a hairpin covered in glycol the other someone off in front grabbed a big handfull of front brake. My advice is to treat mastering the bike as an art form. get Kieth Codes book :a twist of the wrist: learn the physics and every time you swing your leg over the bike increase your awareness, I am amazed how lazy I had become in cars. Beware of group rides.
Good luck on the 800 be aware of your skills and ride within them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,928 Posts
Keep in mind the MSF instructors are ALL about &gt

.He said he thought it was "way too much bike for a first time rider." and recommended that I buy a small used bike and practice for a year before I tried it.
safety. I'm sure he was just looking out for you. At least you took the course first!
I just finished the course today after not being on a bike for way too long. I'm buying a new 620 very soon although my last bike was a 750. Looking back to when I first started riding, it's probably a good thing that my first bike wasn't my 750. The 800 might be a handful for a new rider unless you show some restraint. Just take it easy, remember the things you learned in the class and you'll probably be just fine.
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I bought my 750 after a 13+ year break from riding during my misspent teenage years. Some friends thought getting a liter bike would have been better but i'm happy with my choice. Now I still want a liter bike but my monsters a blast to ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I think the 800 would be a reasonable starter (after the course) when approached with a degree of caution. Personally , with 30 years riding experience, my 2002 620IE is plenty fast enough to get me in trouble if I so desire but as Hailwood said, the throttle works both ways. After riding so many different bikes over the last three decades, I think the Monsters are easy bikes to ride and probably have the best brakes and handling of anything i have been on
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I had (am having) a midlife crisis, and wanted a motorcycle. Did a lot of research and went to a lot of showrooms. Was unable to resist the Monsters, so I bought a Monster 800. Took the MSF course, and after I passed, one of the instructors asked me if I thought I was ready for the Ducati. I said I thought I'd be practicing in parking lots for a LONG time, but eventually would take it out on the road when I felt comfortable. He said he thought it was "way too much bike for a first time rider." and recommended that I buy a small used bike and practice for a year before I tried it. What now? It's getting delivered the day after tomorrow. Is he right? I live in Colorado, so there are plenty of places to practice and learn the feel of the bike (and proper respect) with little or no traffic, but now I'm wondering if in my midlife crisis wasn't a little too extreme. Any advice?
Welcome to the board and the Ducati "Clan". Please dont get imitated by the bike or ur lack of experience. Monster is a very forgiving bike as opposed to some other sport bikes. I am pretty sure your MSF instructor got carried away by the ducati fame and also check with ur other friends who take the MSF course after u do with the same instructor .. he will be using u as an example of a big "No's" :). Yes Monster is a good starter bike even an 800 is. Havin read what everyone has to say I just wanted to add please do some research on gear. "DO NOT" I repeat "DO NOT" hesitate to spend ur money on gear after u get the bike. you need helmet , leathers and boots. There are some pretty good ones out there. Go with ur fit and comfortability. Given ur midlife crisis .. look as flashy as possible ;).

Anil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
796 Posts
An 800 standard is not too much bike to start on. Maybe a 749 or 916 but not the monster. Just ride safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
sounds like you really aren't in that group of riders who like to see how fast you can go your first ride out... the generalization that your MSF instructor was mentioning about the 800 being too large of a bike for you is better suited for those under 20 kids who can't wait to get their hands on an R1 and have never ridden before.

you already have respect for the monster that you've purchased so you're less likely to get in trouble on it than most other riders who have a "no fear" attitude. stay on the conservative side esp. the first 6 months of riding your new motorcycle and you'll get an idea of where you are on the skill tree.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
321 Posts
I don't think it will be two much of a problem, but you should always remain respectful of the bike.

From personal experience I found that the size and weight of the monster compared with the other recent bikes I had been riding was the overwhelming issue and the fact that for a given throttle opeining I was going 40mph faster.

You need that little part of your brain continously monitoring your own performance, am I out of control, can I stop safely without hitting anything if the worst happens, am I driving appropriately for my physical condition, alert, sleepy, semi incapacitated from drugs or alchol.
 
U

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
This particular instructor is a Harley guy. He may have been a little miffed at me because I mentioned that Harleys were the ONLY bikes I didn't look at while shopping (long story). Could be too that he's not that familiar with Ducatis other than by reputation

As for gear, I think I've spent more on gear than I did on the bike. Spent a stupid amount of money on one jacket just because it says Ducati on it...but I'm a slave to fashion...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45,105 Posts
just want to say i started riding almost 3 years ago. my first bike was, and still is an m750d. i also took to the streets immediately after passing the MSF course. almost 3 years and 18,000 miles later, i think it was a good decision. as long s you stay within your limits, go for it.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Just have them add a few teeth to the rear sproken so the low end is smoother and slower. And be careful. People assume Ducati's are fast bikes. He may be one of them. But the 800 Monster will be much slower then a 600 Jap bike. And much easier to handle with the weight distribution.
If your still worried, open up the news paper and buy a trail bike/dirt bike. Something cheap. Ride her in the parking lot. Get the feel of a bike clutch and then ride your Monster later in the season. You should be able to move the used bike once your feel better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
This particular instructor is a Harley guy. He may have been a little miffed at me because I mentioned that Harleys were the ONLY bikes I didn't look at while shopping (long story). Could be too that he's not that familiar with Ducatis other than by reputation

As for gear, I think I've spent more on gear than I did on the bike. Spent a stupid amount of money on one jacket just because it says Ducati on it...but I'm a slave to fashion...
BTW u dint mention where ur from ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
That is a great Bike !

As someone said, go down to H or Y 600 and I think You might have problems because You are riding top speed all the time....

Good Choice, that is no midlife crisis, I would say, You finally arrived where You want to be !

Gear, practice, more practice, and common sense.

I think only writing to this board and asking what You are asking show that You made the right choice.

When you feel comfortable, and find Yourselves riding too fast up to Pikes Peak,
go home relax, have sex with You wife, and start again.

Skier
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I agree with Skier. The more you practice, the better and more comfortable you'll feel on the bike. I bought a 750S i.e. for my first bike after passing the MSF course and had the same worries you're expressing. But if you take it slowly and (to repeat myself) practice often, you'll wonder what that instructor was talking about. Enjoy your purchase.
 
P

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I strongly agree with Dennis. I still think the best practice for the street is in the dirt (most all of the top riders do some offseason dirt training). In the dirt you can get the rear loose to see what it does, wheelie, get crossed up and learn how to recover. The AMA gives a beginner trail riding class and in most places they provide the bike.

You have a healthy attitude and a great forgiving bike, so relax and enjoy. I agree you should occasionally practice the MSF stuff, then at the end of the season take the MSF advanced course.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
147 Posts
Your instructor reflects a legitimate but old school of thought. It's hard to find bikes much smaller. Approaching 50, I remember when we started with Honda 50s, 125s etc. 350s were medium size and a 650-750 was a BIG bike. Like it or not 650s, 883s, and the like are now starter bikes. Many people take an MSF course and take off from there on a Harley Sportster. Not saying that's good, just the way it is. May be the reason for rising fatalities but we don't know yet.

My first adult bike was a 67 hp Honda Nighthawk 750. With a the knowledge and skills from MSF and adult discipline on the throttle, you should do fine. In six months and 1,000 miles you can do the Experienced Rider course. It's only a day but a lot more time on things that will get you: top ten crash situations and a lot on cornering/traction. Street strategies are different from dirt; no cars to take you out in the woods.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
If you didn't have any problem passing the MSF course, you shouldn't have any problem riding a Monster 800. As long as you're not trying to find the limits of the bike in the areas of cornering or braking, they're very well behaved.

I generally recommend a used bike as a first bike so it's not so painful when you manage to drop it when you get in some awkward situation, but if you really want to start on a new bike, the Monster is an excellent choice.

I disagree on the recommendation to get Keith Code's A Twist of the Wrist. It's too racetrack oriented. It's better to get A Twist of the Wrist II, and better still to start off with David L. Hough's Proficient Motorcycling.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top