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Discussion Starter #1
So I am getting used to the clutch on my new (to me) 98' Monster 900. It has a slave cylinder that makes the lever really light which is not a problem, if I ever get used to it. It seems like there is no slip, it's just go (dry clutch) which is not a problem either, except to pass the low speed driving test. But my throttle seems extremely sensitive. A little twist and I am really moving, and a little the over way and there is serious engine braking. Is this normal and I just not used to the setup, or is there a tweak to change this a little.

Thanks for any ideas.
 

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Some of our carb-savvy folks can likely give you some pointers. From what I've read here, it can be smoothed out some.

My Monster's injected, so I can't give you any FHE on what to do, and that's what you need.
 

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Its normal. You can change a few things if you are comfortable going into the carbs like changing primary jets and idle jets.I found it abit annoying at first as slow speeds are with the throttle only just off idle. you could try changing sprocket sizes to get the rpm's at a different throttle position
.good luck,
Daniel.
 

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It's pretty normal because they make so much torque. On carb models, if it's tuned up properly already the main thing you can do is make sure the throttle cable is adjusted correctly (1-2mm of slack movement where the edge of the grip is next to the cable housing).

You'll get used to the clutch. I don't find it much different than other bikes.

Going up 2 teeth on the back sprocket or 1 down on the front from stock will help smooth out starting off and low speed driveability.

I got my Monster after not riding for 21 years. I wouldn't use one for a driving exam if I were a new rider because of the low speed manners and the limited steering lock for turning. I would borrow or even rent something easier to control. If you must do it on the Monster - don't be afraid to constantly engage and disengage the clutch at super slow speeds to smooth things out and keep the engine from making the bike buck and lurch.
 

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If you must do it on the Monster - don't be afraid to constantly engage and disengage the clutch at super slow speeds to smooth things out and keep the engine from making the bike buck and lurch.
Also try using the rear brake to stabilize the speed on the low speed manuvers--practice it first and see if it works for you-
 

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To echo what was said above, be sure your throttle has the appropriate free play.

A change to a 41T rear or 14T front will help you some as well.

I concur as well that the driving test will be a challenge on an M900. I tested on a Honda 250 in the MSF basic course, but I took the experienced course a year later on my Monster.

The primary problem is that the Monster doesn't like low rev roll-ons. The power delivery is too "pulsey" so it's very hard to balance the bike leaning through low speed corners. In the ERC, they have exercises in which they want you to shift through two or three gears. On the Monster, this results in being forced to maneuver at very low revs. If your test does not require you to shift up, you'll be better off. You can keep it in first through the cones.

On the positive side, you should have no difficulty passing the wheelie test ;D
 
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Your a brave man to test on a monster 900. I dont think I would have passed back then on my monster. I rode a BMW R65 and it likes low speeds, monsters dont. Good luck and find another bike for the test. It can be done....but I would try and avoid it.
 

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Let me add that I wouldn't hesitate today to test on my M900. We're tight :). But we've been together for 11,000 miles. I'm glad I didn't have to test on it as a newbie!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the replies and advice. I plan on dropping the front spocket 1 tooth, the concensus appears to be that is the way to go.
I told my dad that the monster does not like low speed manuvering, he just shook his head.
My alternative for the test is a Sportster, which will go slow but it is a big bike comparitively.
Thanks again.
 

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My cable was a bit tight and adjustment certainly helped (oh, and new r-sprocket), but to be frank, after years of riding re-mapped, fuel-injected bikes with rather linear delivery, I realized how sloppy my lever work had become.
 
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I dont know your back ground, but have you thought about the motorcycle safety course. They have some great tips and the instruction really helps new riders. The plus side (in Washington) you take the test on a class bike, those damn tanks are expensive.

Well if you choose the monster for the test, practice your clutch control, you will need it. Go practice and practice some more, it can be done.

Good luck and keep the rubber side down.
 

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dduc makes a good point that I had forgotten - But it was something I realized for myself as I got my skills back on the Monster after so long away from bikes.

Monsters do require your utmost concentration, skill and finesse on all rider inputs. And when you do it right it will reward you with unequaled riding experiences. I had owned and ridden every kind of bike before. Nothing is like the Monster in terms of the way it feels when ridden well. ;D
 

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when I was passing my NJ test (6 years ago) there was a guy with a 50cc scooter renting it out for tests. In NJ license is the same for MC and scooters.

Find out what regulations are in your state and if they allow it - rent an automatic 50cc scooter for the test
 

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I had my M900 for about 4 months before a tested for my license, and I past on the first try, 100%, but I practice on the DMV course every day for about a week before the test, I did it after closing time, is not that hard, just play with the clucht lever and you should be fine.
keep it safe ;)
 
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I took the Honda Rider Course. If I wasn't riding a H*nda I would have surely failed on my Duc.

I replaced my levers and improved feel a lot but I really noticed that things improved after my 600 mile service. My biggest complaint is travel on my bike. The clutch has such a limited slip zone and only at the last bit of travel with the stock levers. With my adjustables i've pulled it in a bit but I still want to improve things.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you everyone for the suggestions. I have been riding all my life but this is my first streetbike that I own so I decided I should probably "obey the law". I have thought about the Rider Safety Course, which I am sure I would learn a lot, but the two locations that offer them are an hour away in different directions. In Florida you can get a temp. license and then test for the real thing, what I am leaning towards, so I will become more comfortable with the Monster.

Back to the "Tech"

I have clip ons on my bike, which limits steering a lot.
A buddy looked at it today and said it looks like the front end was lowered. Does anyone know how far above the top triple the fork tube is supposed to protrude? Right now I have just enough to get the clip ons on. (on on). It seems about right.
 

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For that model, the stock setting should have the forks above the top of the triple clamp by 17 or 19 mm. I've seen that expressed as either to the top of the for tube or to the top of the cap (top bolt). Mine were 17 mm to the top of the tube itself whe I got the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Mark.
I assume then that my bike must have been lowered to accomodate the clip ons. I am wondering what effects this has on handling? Any ideas?
 

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If it has been lowered in the front, the bike probably turns in a little quicker than at the stock height. It may be a little less stable at higher speeds which translates to possibly more chance of getting "head shake" exiting fast turns or maybe slightly more likely to get into a tank slapper under certain (and often unpredictable) circumstances.

I have seen reports on here by some that other than a little quicker turn in with the front lowered 5-10 mm, there seem to be no negative effects. So it seems this situation has other variables at work which make it difficult to calculate the exact effects of lowering the front.
 
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