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I don't know if I'm the only one with this problem. I'm really new to the Bike community... I got my first bike a 2001 monster 600 dark last summer... everytime i go to the bike shop i feel like they're pulling a fast one on me...

Does anyone have any tips on picking a mechanic? Or resources for basic motorcycle knowledge?
 
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good luck man. I am "fortunate" enough to have to Ducati dealers within 15 miles of me. However, both have mechanics that are just outta duc-skool. From what I have heard, the best thing is to do it yourself, or find somebody you know that can. good luck
 
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Sometimes you can get the wrong impression (like feeling they're pulling one over on you). But the most direct thing to do is ASK them what their experience is.

I've worked in bike shops for a few years now, and for the most part I've seen that mechanics really want to do a good job. There's an old saying that basically says "the first bike is sold by the salesman, the rest are sold by service".

Trust your instincts, and ask when in doubt. Watch out for up-sells. They should want to fix what needs fixing, inform you of anything else wrong that they find, be open, and do the job right. If something goes wrong, they will fix it.

Good luck. If things don't work out, be patient but don't give up- it's on them to do the job right. On the other hand, make sure you realize that you get what you pay for.

If you have any specific reason you feel uneasy, post it. Otherwise, maybe you need to get in touch with some people in your local moto community about the shop in question. As far as resources go, check the FAQ here and check out the...internet!

seeya,
Scott.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The reason why i'm feeling uneasy is because I brought my bike to this shop about a month ago... they were supposed to dewinterize the bike, change the oil and tune it up... since i brought the bike in i've only driven the bike three times... then last weekend as I was riding the bike kept on stalling... the engine would stall each time i was below 3000rpm... when i told the shop about this... they said that i have to bring the bike back in and possibly buy a new battery
 
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I had to get a new battery a few months after I bought mine. I don't know too much about mechanics either. Get your Ducati owners manual, get the info on the battery and go to CycleGear (or another aftermarket bike shop) and buy a battery. Or you can buy it at Ducati. I think it's Yuasa brand? Anyway, get your hands dirty by doing the work yourself. It's only a 15 minute job. Getting the screws loose might be a pain but you can do it for a lot cheaper than the mechanic.

BTW..when looking for good mechanic..make sure his card says "Certified Ducati Mechanic". I found one who works out of his garage in Mesa! Good work without the jacked up dealer prices! 8)
 

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BTW..when looking for good mechanic..make sure his card says "Certified Ducati Mechanic". I found one who works out of his garage in Mesa! Good work without the jacked up dealer prices! 8)
Are you talking about Tom Hull? He's the best! I won't let anyone, other then Tom, touch my Monster.
http://www.tomsitaliantuneandservice.com/
 

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If the bike is stalling or running rough after extended storage without proper preparation on YOUR part, the causes likely are:

1. Battery was not kept charged and is now weak, and yes, might ned to be replaced.

2. The fuel, if it was not treated properly with a fuel stabilizer before storage for a month or more, began to form deposits inside your fuel system. This is HARD to diagnose and fix, and is best avoided by proepr use of fuel stabilizer. Once incurred, the cures are, from lowest cost to highest:

a. use the bike a lot, with FRESH fuel, until some of the deposits get removed via usage (SOMETIMES works)

b. add a fuel system cleaner to your fuel tank, which will clean out the deposits over a couple of tanks of gas (check with your dealer on an APPROVED one to use, and be aware: some of them are strong enough to peel paint if spilled on it)

c. Pay your dealer to clean out your fuel system.

Very few things are as bad for a vehicle as neglect in preparing for storage.

Good luck.

Jim G
 

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Back to the original question, I think the things to look for in a mechanic are: willingness to listen and ask questions of you. If a mechanic has the "I know what's wrong, no need to talk to you" attitude it is a danger sign. Also the ability to admit when he doesn't know something or can't fix something is a big plus. Not so different than any other sort of business really.

Oh, and really be careful of any mechanic whose work area is a pigsty.
 

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Okay, maybe I'm crazy or just don't know anything

then last weekend as I was riding the bike kept on stalling... the engine would stall each time i was below 3000rpm... when i told the shop about this... they said that i have to bring the bike back in and possibly buy a new battery
about Ducatis yet, but why would a weak battery cause the bike to stall below 3000 rpm? What else does the battery do besides power the starter? Am I missing something here?
 

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alternator output is low enough at low RPMs that the battery may be needed to supply the above parts mentioned by Herb. at these times if your battery is not up to snuff you may have running problems, particularly if your bike has fuel injection.
 

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the 600 is a carbureted bike so fuel injection is not the issue.could be a clogged pilot jet. I recently saw a m600 that didnt have its carbs drained over a two month time petiod totaly gum up both pilot jets and one of the enrichener jets.
if the bike is starting fine I doubt it is the battery .
as to finding a good mechanic...
ask around in your area , find out where the locals all go and what there experiences are. evey mechanic I have ever worked with has been 100% about doing a good job.....but mistakes do happen. then you get to find out how good your mechanic really is, problems should be
explained
and then solved to everyones satisfaction.
the last one is tough because everyone has different expectations. just dont give up, have things explained so you can understand them or find someone who can.
 
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