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Nick Ienatsch's book "Sport Riding Techniques" is the evolution of "The Pace" articles. For those who haven't read it, it is highly recommended. [thumbsup]
 

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BUMP........and a big +1 for the whole concept and all those who practice "The Pace" on a regular basis.

Hey Michael how about a sticky for "The Pace"? [clap] Most of us who have been riding for a long time know of it, most usually practice it, and take it for granted that almost everyone else is aware of it. :-[

It's a GREAT concept that should be at the forefront of the Riding Techniques section so that veterans will be reminded of it, and any that have not been exposed to it will be. [thumbsup]

After all the street and the track are two very different creatures, and ALL of us that take this sport seriously tend to blur the line on occasion whether we admit it to ourselves or not. ;)

IMHO its a great method for a much safer enjoyment of this wonderful sport! The community as a whole would benefit from having it's practice spread widely throughout our ranks. :angel:
 

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I'll second the recommendation to sticky "The Pace". [thumbsup]
 

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Thanks for the sticky. My first time reading the article. Good read. [thumbsup]

This part of the article I've experienced first hand:

The number-one survival skill, after mastering emergency braking, is setting your corner-entrance speed early, or as Kenny Roberts says, "Slow in, fast out." Street riders may get away with rushing into 99 out of 100 corners, but that last one will have gravel, mud or a trespassing car. Setting entrance speed early will allow you to adjust your speed and cornering line, giving you every opportunity to handle the surprise.
 

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This is very good reading. I wish he'd discussed emergency maneuvers, though, as I do have concern about deer. Lately every time I go for a nice burn on the local backwoods I see them.. bucks, does and fawns.
Has anyone tried installing one of the commercial deer alarms on their bike? I read somewhere you should steer for an area directly behind the deer, however I've seen them spin 180 degrees on a dime.

Giuseppe
 

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I remember reading this back when...but I always felt he left something out that I always followed. " Never set the Pace faster than your slowest rider!" When you add a new person to your group always ask their skill level (you can usualy tell). Out of four years of riding almost every Sunday I never lost anyone. I never asked anyone to ride with me but the group grew and on any given Sunday there would be seven to ten riders.
 

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Can't learn enough about riding techniques. Even if there's one detail that's worth adding to your regimen.

I've been the slowest rider on a lot of rides, but it's better to go home on two wheels than in a big four-wheeled one with flashers.
 

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Good article. Sometimes I find myself trying to push it hard during a family ride. It's about enjoying the ride, not being competitive. That's what the motocross or road race track is for. Always a better rider out their anyway, unless your Nicky Hayden. I'm going to try to start living by the pace philosophy more on my rides.
 

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giuseppe said:
This is very good reading. I wish he'd discussed emergency maneuvers, though, as I do have concern about deer. Lately every time I go for a nice burn on the local backwoods I see them.. bucks, does and fawns.
Has anyone tried installing one of the commercial deer alarms on their bike? I read somewhere you should steer for an area directly behind the deer, however I've seen them spin 180 degrees on a dime.

Giuseppe
Those deer alarms are worthless crap. If they actually worked, I think they'd be standard equipment on all vehicles, since deer strikes are such a huge problem in parts of the country.

As for steering anywhere, don't do it. Just stop. Animals like that are so unpredictable, doing anything other than stopping will most likely have both of you on the ground.
 

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Hey, thanks for the information, ninja. I didn't think those deer alarms worked all that well.
Problem is, where I live and ride the bush is very thick on the sides of the road. If the deer are pushed by dogs or predators, there is very little time to react and stop. In many respects I would have to say the deer are more threatening to motorcyclist than careless drivers, at least in this area.

 

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That is an excellent article, reminds me why I ride and why I bought this Monster!!
 
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