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hey all..

this may have been discussed before, but i didnt really see anything that answered my question...so sorry in advance!

anywho...i'm gonna be a new member to the monster family coming this weekend, and will be throwing it in the pickup truck coming back from the seller's place...

so whats the best strategies for this?
do i put it on the sidestand?
do i lock the steering wheel (can you even?) ?
do i leave the bike in gear?
what are the tiedown points? the tires?

so if this has been all discussed before and i missed it, if someone could point me to a similar thread that would be sweet!

thanks in advance and i friggin can't wait until i get it (its an 02 M750 dark btw...)!
 

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i tie mine to the two handles under the passenger seat, and around the fork tubes in between the triple clamps...

Not on a sidestand..... in gear, but if you use those ratcheting straps like I use... it'll be so tight it wont move anywhere...
 
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Ok, here's the low-down. I just typed a long-ass reply and lost it by accident. ARRGH. So I apologize if this one's short.

use a canyon dancer http://www.canyondancer.com/ or soft ties to connect your tie-downs to your handlebars. If you're using soft ties, connect them between your triple clamps and the first curve of your bars by looping them through each other.

Next, connect your tie-downs from the canyon dancer or soft ties to the front of the bed of the truck. I installed some eyelets in the front corners of my bed to make a decent attachment point.

Sinch them down to compress your forks a few inches, but nothing too tight. In an extreme case you can blow your fork seals doing this.

Now your bike is standing on its own. Next, take a rope (or an extra tie-down, whatever) and attach it to one side of the front of the bed, continuing on to the very front of the wheel (around where it touches the very front of the bed) loop it around the wheel, then attach it to the othe side. This prevents the wheel from turning and loosening everything up.

Lastly, repeat the last step with the rear wheel.

Some things to remember-
-Don't overtighten
-make sure your tiedowns stay straight
-tie up all loose ends
-ride fast take chances.

YMMV, and I'm sure there's a bunch of ways to accomplish the same goals.

good luck,
Scott.
 

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We had to put the bike in catty- cornered, tail gate wouldn't shut if put in straight. that way your tire was sort of chocked into the corner, used 4 tie downs, used soft ties and hooked to the frame 2 in front 2 in back. I also locked the front brake with a velcro strap. But the bike stayed in place no problems, went from Pa. to Fla. But stop and check after the first 50-100 miles, some times the straps need retightened, and check them evry 100 miles or so after that.
 
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First off I have a 98 Ford Ranger long bed... Fits in there perfectly... I was a Newbie, not only was it my first motorcycle, it was my first Ducati, first Monster and first time putting a motorcycle in the back of my truck bed... I had everything check, helmet gear and all, and even insurance for the bike... While I was driving up to pick ip the bike it had to call the dealer and ask how I was gonna tie it down... Rory at Munroe Motors told me they sold ties and had me covered....

Fastforward to the loading part... While still dazed and happy about seeing my new bike I asked for help to load my bike... Matt I'am gussing the Service manager got the laoding ramp placed it at the edn of the tailgate, took my bike got a running start and loaded the bike like it was nothing.. Guess practice makes perfect.... once on there took the ties I bought (forgot the brand) and some sleve I can't recall teh name of but they go over the handle bar grips and then tie to the tie downs... Its a Really easy job to tie them once u do it a couple of times...
Funny thing is I dunno how to tie the bike in a truck with a small bed... dunno how to tie it down when the bike is at an angle... As far as the ties... You'll use them to transport your bike and sometime find them useful for other things as well...
Heck I helped trasport a boxspring and a matress with the use of the ties one day... I got thinking I have no rope... then the ligh bulb came on... and Looked in the back of my seat and there were the ties...

Good luck, the folks at the dealer will help u out with it...
 

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D-C is correct. Follow his post.

His point about not compressing the forks too much is important and not to be overlooked.

Anything that keeps the front wheel from turning is fine. D-C's rope trick. a chock, a piece of 2x4 on each side, the friction of the wheel against the truck bed is usually enough.

No need to angle the bike. The tailgate will handle the weight. Hell, it will handle the weight of a Harley dresser.

No need to get crazy about tying it down. Once it's pulled forward gravity and your bike's suspension will keep it on the bed. Local shops use only 2 tiedowns. I use 4, 2 front and 2 rear.

The soft ties make everything easier. I had good luck using the top triple tree as a mounting point. (No snide remarks...it was snowing and 400 miles when I brought it home. No trucks since)

NO SIDESTAND. the bike will be upright.

I have heard both sides of the in/out of gear arguement. My shop insists on neutral. Claims that the tiedowns hold the bike fine and if its in gear, rocking (forward and back) puts stress on the trans because the rear wheel can't move. I don't know. Seems like chain slack would compensate, but I just folloed my shop's advice. My 20 years experience is nothing compared to his and he loads more bikes in a week than I do all year.

Doc
 

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All the posts are right on, but I recommend that you don't leave your motorcycle in gear, there is a slight rocking motion while you are towing, and chances are things will be O.K., but there is a chance that the rocking motion will stress a gear in the transmission, and if you are going far enough, this could cause damage, (I've seen it in cars).
 
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Hi - this is for Scott.
Liked the idea of the "canyondancer's" which size did you find best for the monster. 33" of 37" ?.
 
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I have had this little poodle bike's forks cinched down tight for many miles (5500 in the last week alone) without any ill effects. I am thinking about modifying the fork lock to allow locking in the straight ahead position. Planning to put the 620 Monster back there if I can work out an easy loading method. My latest idea is a hydraulic rotating arm that the bike hangs from and is lifted up and away from the truck. I animated one in 2D in my CAD program and it worked perfectly.
 
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That's weird the image address is :

........home.comcast.net/~jrod*d*i*c*k/0.JPG

but in the final post jrodd*i*c*k appears as jrodthingy. I guess that's funny is there some software on this site that's finds d*i*c*k offensive and replaces it with thingy.
 
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I guess I answered my own question. i had to put asterisks in to prevent d*i*c*k from showing up as thingy. Now what do I have to do change my name?
 
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I'll try and post a shot of it when I get home again. I saw something like it for swinging a wheelchair and passenger into a van. The chair hangs from the arm and is rotated up and in. The deck on my truck is 42" high, the scooter will go up on a 10' ramp. Anything bigger is going to need help.

Jeff
 

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OK, so, we know how to tie it down. How about getting it into/outta the pickup? I've got a wooden ramp that I built, do we have 2 or three people to help? I've loaded dirt bikes, but never a street bike.
 
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