Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm unhappy with the lack of stability and twitchiness my bike has during high speed cornering as well as high speed straight line runs. I can usually hang in the corners with my friends on their sportbikes, but lately it just doesn't feel stable.

I haven't seen any steering stabilizers on any of the parts websites. Anyone have one? Recommendations? Where to look? I think it seems like a logical first step to take to make it less twitchy up front.

Thanks

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
David -

Actually, a steering damper is not the first step in eliminating the twitchiness that you describe. The first step is making sure that the suspension/sag of your bike is properly set. Otherwise, a steering damper will simply mask the underlying problems. If you still have trouble with twitchiness after getting your bike properly set up, only at that point should you consider a steering damper.

After having my suspension set up (there are DIY guides online, but I had my trusty mechanic set mine), I didn't experience any more twitchiness but I did have a Toby steering damper installed, moreso as a preventative measure (have you seen any of those tankslapper vids? Freaky-deeky!!).

Good luck!
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
yep I agree don't go for a damper first.....
You check your tire pressure I assume before you ride.
What kind of tires?
Stock Bars?
How much do you weigh?
How aggressively do you ride?
If you haven't, as m620dark suggested, sag and preload is a good place to start.
Getting weight over the front wheel is another option to consider.

What I am wonderin' about is that you said lately it doesn't feel stable?

Also check the sponsor links here for parts.....

Ah ha...now I know why you said lately I just saw your other post... ::)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,266 Posts
Ive got clipons on my 620 and dont notice any twitchyness, and its regularly run at WOT most of the time (its a track only bike)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I actually didn't check my tire pressure before the ride, I'll check tomorrow and post again. That could be my problem, i didn't even think about it. To answer your other questions, I'm about 155 lbs, I have stock bars, stock Dunlop front tire, and I ride pretty aggressively. Tend to be braking hard going into most corners and accelerating hard just about everywhere I go. I think clip-ons is a step for me for next year, and i know that will help eliminate some front end shake due to additional weight over the front wheel. When I ride now I lean way in towards the handlebars to put as much weight over the front as possible to reduce the shakes.
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Always start with the basics, as was suggested above make certain your suspension is set up for you. Doesn't cost anything more than time to do.

Second go to Sears/Autobarn wherever and get yourself a GOOD tire pressure gauge. Then get in the habit of using it.
It is a fast way to see if you might have a hidden puncture/leak....

two pressures I ALWAYS check before making a run are tires and brakes....call me quirky if you want, but I get off on knowing in advance that I can bring the thing to a halt and that my contact patch with the road is viable

Your tires will last longer if you are at the right fill....and your bike won't feel like you're riding a garbage bag full of live eels down a waterslide due to low pressure

Make sure your rear wheel isn't angled. You mentioned that you have a stock Dunlop front tire....do you also have the matching rear tire?

and lastly, look at a quality damper. I ride some pretty beat up roads on occasion in the NY metro area and the damper gives my wrists and arms a break in reducing the amount of road shock that is transmitted up through the handlebars
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Looking at your other post, I would see if who put your tires on would check the balance again for you. I hope that they would.
What ducman doesn't say is that he also added a rear ride height adjuster and jacked the rear up. Something you may want to look into also.
I would think you would want to attack your unstablity one step at a time and see what happens on the road with each change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
well it's raining here today, but for tomorrow I'll be going over tire pressures and making sure they are right. If that's no good, I'll have the balance on the wheel checked. We'll see where it goes from there

David
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
Tires can make a difference too. The Bridgestone BT-010 front tire made my bike wobble a bit at high speed, something that is not fixed by a steering damper, since it was oscillating at a rate of about three per second. Switching to a BT-020 made the bike totally stable, more so than with the previous Dunlop or Michelin front tires.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top