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Please explain what is needed for steering stabalizing on an 03 monster 800. I have experienced front shake in an old jeep with worn steering and tires, and it is as gripping as you get. I don't want it on a bike. What after market products are there and what light can be shed on the subject of front wheel shakes; ie: a tank slapper
 

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Hmm....lots of different products out there for steering stabilization.

Most require some degree of skill on installation. This can be bad. I've seen ones that attach to the frame that are far too large. I've seen ones that attach to the horn mount. These are not bad. The best one I've seen so far is by Matris. They are a somewhat unknown company out of Italy but I've held one of their steerin dampers and it is sexy as hell.

Their mounting is amazing. Imagine Superbike damper on your monster. Nuff said. Great position, doesn't require much skill to install , and it is quick.

I do believe that you need a stock handle bar mount to install them...so no Cyclecat triple clamp upper or any business like that.

Pic / Info: http://www.ca-cycleworks.com/

I think these are also available on oncycles.com.

Other Products: Ohlins (Superbike, maybe monster?), I've seen 2 other brands for monster, but they aren't hugely popular so I don't remember off the top of my head.

Anyway, there is a good place to start. As far as DAMPING -- I highly recommend something like this to reduce headshake when on a rough surface.

It works. :)
 

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In 34 years of riding i have never used or wanted a steering damper (stabiliser), I think some people hold the bars too tight and rigid, some bikes are twitchy but not monsters, try different riding and grip postions and pressure before buying a stabiliser damper.

Jerry
 

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jerryz said:
In 34 years of riding i have never used or wanted a steering damper (stabiliser), I think some people hold the bars too tight and rigid, some bikes are twitchy but not monsters, try different riding and grip postions and pressure before buying a stabiliser damper.
Jerry, I said that too for six years, until just the right conditions got together all at the same time and I was able to experience a http://www.ducatimonster.org/smf/index.php/topic,1795.0.html"]tankslapper firsthand.[/url]

Monsters are a bit less stable than most other bikes and the addition of a good steering damper is good insurance. If I ever own another Monster, you can be sure I'll put a steering damper on it.
 

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Jerry,

I rode and raced off-road since 1970, I didn't think I needed one on my KTM until I installed a GPR. Once you ride with and without dampers you'll understand they raise your survival rate substancially when pushing the limits or the unexpected occurs.

Dampers are money well spent in comparison to cosmetic improvements. Dampers are in essence a health insurance policy.
 

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Guess i have been lucky then I have had 2 tank slappers , one on a Yamaha TDM 850 which i accelerated out of , the other was on a BMW GS 1000 which i controlled by releasing pressure on the bars and pulling in the clutch.

scary moments though. Saw a friend of mine thrown off a Harley duece by a vicious tank slapper i had to swerve to avoid the wreck.

jerry
 

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But aren't there two different circumstances causing tankslappers, low speed and high speed?

If I recall correctly, Scott's occurred when he rode across a livestock grating that 'wacked' the front wheel. From the pics he posted, would a steering damper have made a difference? It seems the damper's ability to 'freeze' the front-end might have dumped him right on the spot rather than destabilizing the bike (with the very slight possibility of recovery) and prompting the ensuing crash. Kinda like crossing a RR track at too obtuse of an angle?

Unloading the front end too much, followed by a destabilizing influence like reloading with the wheel slightly off-camber, at speed on an open road seems a different circumstance.

My point is that I've seen dampers advertized with low-speed and high-speed controls (e.g., Scotts/Ohlins). Which of these is the Matris (and other piston-type) damper designed to handle?
 

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In the off-road environment the GPR (single speed) and Scott's (hi-low speed) both get the job done and appear to be about equal in terms of professional riders using them.

The off-road dampers really shine in heavy rock and/or root sections at any riding pace, front end deflection is reduced dramatically, thus improving traction and confidence. In high speed (60-100 mph) whoops, wash-boards, and ruts they are a guardian angel IMO.

Basically any situation where quick steering deflection can occur is where a damper performs, whether its roots and rocks, potholes, small animals, road debris, surface transitions, etc.

What they are not - is a fix for improperly set-up suspension.
 

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OT said:
If I recall correctly, Scott's occurred when he rode across a livestock grating that 'wacked' the front wheel. From the pics he posted, would a steering damper have made a difference?
I'm quite certain that a steering damper would have saved me.

What I believe happened is that the bump on the far side of the cattle guard bounced the front wheel off of the pavement an inch or so. Since I was in a very slight right turn at the time rather than going totally straight, I believe that the countersteering force turned the wheel a little bit to the left and that the wheel was aimed a few degrees to the left when it came back down. The suddenly regained traction caused the front wheel to instantly want to go back to the right as quickly as possible, quickly leading to uncontrollable full lock oscillations.

A steering damper would have prevented the instant correction from turning the wheel very far and I expect that I would have noticed a little wobble and continued on my way rather than the sudden panicked realization that I wasn't going to be able to save that one.

A steering damper is a good thing to have on your Monster.
 

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Scott R. Nelson said:
I'm quite certain that a steering damper would have saved me.

What I believe happened is that the bump on the far side of the cattle guard bounced the front wheel off of the pavement an inch or so. Since I was in a very slight right turn at the time rather than going totally straight, I believe that the countersteering force turned the wheel a little bit to the left and that the wheel was aimed a few degrees to the left when it came back down. The suddenly regained traction caused the front wheel to instantly want to go back to the right as quickly as possible, quickly leading to uncontrollable full lock oscillations.

A steering damper would have prevented the instant correction from turning the wheel very far and I expect that I would have noticed a little wobble and continued on my way rather than the sudden panicked realization that I wasn't going to be able to save that one.

A steering damper is a good thing to have on your Monster.
Scott, thanks for the update...much clearer and convincing (not that I needed convincing)
 
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