Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

going to start disassembling my 900 engine and need the special tools for when it goes back together, to torque everything correctly. Belt pulley, clutch holder, engine turner and timing disc, etc

Does anyone know if any of the clubs have tool hire facilities.
I'm in the NSW Citroen club and they lend out the special tools you need when you do work on your Cit.
Would love to purchase the tools, but some you will probably only use very rarely, and i'm sure i'm going to find some nasty and expensive surprises when i open her up. ::)

Cheers

Richie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Brave or stupid...

I purchased a 1974 D Special (basement model DS, curvy 70's model), in need of work. It beat me....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45,105 Posts
ace70 said:
Hey everyone,

going to start disassembling my 900 engine and need the special tools for when it goes back together, to torque everything correctly. Belt pulley, clutch holder, engine turner and timing disc, etc
Why is the engine coming apart? Is it damaged? Or just time for a refresh? Or are you hunting horsepower?

Depending on how much work you're planning, you might not need all of those tools... The critical tools that aren't part of a typical toolset are a torque wrench (possibly two - if you need to take the clutch hub and/or flywheel off you'll need a good sturdy one that's probably not going to read down low enough for many of the smaller fasteners), and the magic head nut tool (the Haines manual show how to make one by welding a socket to a 15mm spanner). There's also a special tool for removing the cam pulley nuts which you can make by carefully ginding a spare socket. The clutch holder can also be made up out of an old set of clutch plates (the Haines manual also shows how to make this and the cam pully nut tool), but I got around the need for it by using a borrowed rattle gun instead. A timing disc is only needed if you completely disassemble the heads/valve gear or if you're specifically checking/retiming the cams (and you can also make your own too, google up a pdf one, print it out and stick it to some cardboard). You can turn the engine with the back wheel if it's still in the frame, or with a socket on the flywheel nut if it's not. It's also handy (but not essential) to have little aids like a piston ring compressor, a variety of circlip pliers, haemostats (kind of like locking needle nose pliers), a magnet on a stick, various sized pin punches, various sized drifts (a few screwdrivers you don't mind butchering can replace many drifts and punches, but brass drifts are nicer 'cause they wont damage things as easily when you slip).

Does anyone know if any of the clubs have tool hire facilities.
I've heard DOCNSW have a shim kit that the members can use, I'm not sure about anything else. If you're in Sydney, you're welcome to borrow what I've got...

big
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
It's a good idea to contact your local DOC. A club tool and shim kit is one reason for the very existence of a club. It doesn't cost much to join and you get access to tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Story goes,
I have one engine that has a very big crack in the crankcase, with good internals.
and another engine that i just got with good crankcases but with a piston that wanted to say hello to its little friends, the valves...

the crack in the first engine goes all the way to the half, wasn't likely to get a seal after welding.
And the other, well, lets just say you don't have to take out the gudgeon pin to see what the top of the little end looks like. And the head, don't ask. [laugh]

So, 1 good from 2.

And while i'm in there refresh the top end, new rings, bearings etc, so i don't have to go in there for a while.
Depending on the condition of the pistons maybe some hi comps, etc, see whats out there.

Speaking of mechanics, when i break down the engines, i have access to rattle guns and such, it's just when things go back together, i was wanting to be able to torque everything up properly, and i thought there were parts that i would need some Ducati specific tools to do that.

So thank you, Big, for the thorough break down of the processes and tricks.
I just noticed on your website, for cafes to hang out at, you mention Dieter from Oven. I'm a very good mate of his, worked hospitality with him years ago, and we are both founding fathers of the Ace Racers. We still ride together, well i will be when this Monster gets on the road...
He's sold Oven and left and its gone down hill quick, but he's looking for another cafe site, probably going to be like another Eca Bar [thumbsup] [clap]

and G, yes that is a good idea, i used to be in the NSW DOC when i had my SS, but that was a while ago.
I will probably get an EMS shim kit from the States, always wanted to do my own valves.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45,105 Posts
ace70 said:
Story goes,
I have one engine that has a very big crack in the crankcase, with good internals.
and another engine that i just got with good crankcases but with a piston that wanted to say hello to its little friends, the valves...
Sounds to me like you've got two options there... The easy option is to assume the bigends and rods are OK on the motor thats lunched the valves, and just transplant the top ends from the other motor onto it. That'd save splitting the cases which saves a lot of work, but I'd be asking myself how the piston managed to meet the valves and what other damage either caused that or resulted from that. The more time consuming option is to break both motors down completely and re-use the best bits out of each motor. That'll involve re-shimming the main bearing preload, and possibly re-shimming the gear clusters (though you'd almost certainly be fine if you selected the best condition assembly out of the two you have and take special care to keep track of which shim goes where instead of starting from scratch). If you go down this path, add a dial gauge to the list of tools (to set the main bearing preload).

So thank you, Big, for the thorough break down of the processes and tricks.
no problem!

I just noticed on your website, for cafes to hang out at, you mention Dieter from Oven. I'm a very good mate of his, worked hospitality with him years ago, and we are both founding fathers of the Ace Racers. We still ride together, well i will be when this Monster gets on the road...
Hey, you might know Nick the tombone player too then? Rides a Chili rep 998? I used to live next door to him...

He's sold Oven and left and its gone down hill quick, but he's looking for another cafe site, probably going to be like another Eca Bar [thumbsup] [clap]
Interesting to hear you think it's gone downhill - I've had people recommend I try it with the new owners, I'm told they're working with Paul Bassett (World Barrista Champion in 2003 and all round coffee guru) and getting a custom coffee blend roasted at Rio, apparently they're doing a fabulous job on the coffee... I _guess_ the motorcycle focus probably isn't there anymore since Dieter left though...

You should come and meet us at Mecca some Saturday morning, the coffee there is _very_ good :)

big
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hey Big,

Yes, I did think of just putting the heads from my busted crankcases engine on, for about 5 minutes. Then i thought of what it would sound like as metal bits from the busted piston and valves churned through my easy fix...
The busted piston motor is from a Bears racer when he was on the track. Big noise, no power, clutch in, coast to a stop.
He got the offending Cylinder stripped by Richard Graham, broken cam belt, little tip for the young, DON'T SKIP YOUR BELT CHANGE INTERVALS. The head, piston are stuffed, amazingly the rod and the barrel look good.
I think the best only thing to do is strip both engines, probably use most of the internals from the broken crankcase engine, and keep the extra bits for spares if they are OK. One motor is a '94/'95 the other '96, so no problems with compatability.
Sounds like i'll be reading the Haines book and the factory service book front to back ::)

Yes Big, good friends with Nick as well, hear he is getting rid of his 998, going to chase his dream of playing full time overseas, Oh, and something about a girl [cheeky]

Did not mean to diss the new owners, i saw Dieter build Oven from scratch, so its very different him not being there. And i do miss the bike factor.

Been trying to make it down to Mecca for some time now, always seem to be working or something organised on a Sat morn. Definately see you guys there soon. Can't start the day without a good coffee.

Cheers

Richie
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top