Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,451 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't plan on doing any work to my clutch real soon, but the friction plates will need replacing probably by next spring. So i'm just droolin.. er, planning here.

I saw a great deal on MotoWheels for an In-House slipper clutch. I'm wondering what big difference they make in a street bike is? Are they more reserverd for track riding?

Thanks,

dj
 
G

·
it really depends on your riding style i think... if you habitually (without thought... like 2nd nature) blip the throttle when downshifting to match revs with your speed, then there are very few instances where a slipper clutch will really save the day for you.
if you ride HARD (even just occassionally), and bang through the gears aggressively, then it can certainly help to keep the rear wheel from chirping around when approaching a corner.
if you were figuring on a lightweight clutch anyways, and can find a slipper for a reasonable price, then go for it!
personally, i never really found the need... i blip the throttle downshifting and only had the rear wheel hop or skip in the rain (when it's all sorts of goofy fun!).
 
G

·
just another thought to send the wheels in your head spinning. you can get a nichols clutch basket and aluminum friction plates for about two thirds to half the price of the cheapest priced slipper clutch. take the extra cash and install the nichols flywheel and you've now dropped about 6 lbs of rotational mass off your bike. you get about twice the mass reduction for the same amount of money. reducing the mass in the flywheel and clutch basket will reduce the dissonance between the wheel and crank therefore reducing wheel hop. of course a slipper clutch can totally eliminate wheel hop depending on the pressure plate spring loads if that's what you're looking for. most of the rotational mass of the clutch is in the steel basket and friction plates. the hub is closer to the shaft and has less of a rotational inertial impact than the basket so the benifits of swapping are less. another issue i see with slippers and aluminum hubs is that the ones i've seen don't include the cush drive rubber found in the stock hub. to me that just translates to more frequent wear and tear and more frequent basket and friction plate replacement for a street bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,451 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm exactly the same. I've always bliped the throttle on dowshifts and the only time I've had a problem is in the rain as well. You're right, tons of fun in the middle of a wet intersection making a left turn.... [smiley=shocked.gif]
 
G

·
Most people that think slipper clutches are not worth it -do not have one on their bike. You really don't apreciate it until you have one. (light weight wheels and better brakes are the same way). I've never heard any one say they wish they did not put a slipper clutch on their bike that rides fast.

I have slipper clutches on 3 of my bikes. I try to match my RPMs all the time by blipping the throttle but it isn't always enough. The slipper has saved my butt many times up in the hills and allows me to pick the right gear to get the best drive out of the corners. They especially come in handy on fast down hill turns where the rear wheel is unweighted and slip no matter how much you blip the throttle.

They are also 6.5 pounds lighter than the stock assembly--so you will notice the difference immediately in the way the bike accelerates.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,952 Posts
In addition to continually trying to improve my ability to match rpms for downshifts through blipping the throttle or using trailing throttle while braking, I've started applying the low-tech alternative to a slipper clutch: when I downshift now and don't rpm-match, I ease the clutch out as slowly and smoothly as if I'm launching listening to the rpms and modulating the clutch release very much the same way.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top