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The other day I only had to go a few miles and was tempted to ride in jeans, but then remembered my little get-off (driver did an illegal U-turn into me) in jeans just blocks from my office. That was last summer, I still have marks on my leg from it and I went down < 5 mph.

My day-to-day commuting gear is 2-piece textiles. These are convenient to throw on over business clothes.

I also own an Aerostich one-piece but discovered I hardly use it. It's great if I'm only going from home to office, but if I'm making any stops somewhere or visiting a customer, and want to be able to walk around without hauling the 1-piece suit around, then it doesn't work so well. Also the Aerostich is a little big for me so it acts a bit like a sail on the windy San Mateo bridge.

I wear the Dainese D-dry pants and the Rev-It Angel jacket (both are waterproof, good for rainy days).





The original knee/shin armor in the pants didn't fit me very well (too large) and got very uncomfortable. I ended up buying some kid-sized dirt bike armor and modded them to fit in the pants.

For the track or for weekend twisty riding I wear 2-piece Dainese leathers that zip together. BTW, my gear decisions are largely based on finding something that fits me. I don't have much choice unless I go custom.
 

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I didn't mean to make anyone feel bad or scared... I think my point in posting the story was just to bring attention to the importance of gear and to stress that there are many injuries that can be prevented simply by wearing proper gear.

Sometimes when I'm feeling like it is a jungle out there, I remember the other side: With proper gear and good riding skills, the risk of riding a motorcycle can be greatly reduced. I remember reading an article in Sport Rider magazine that left an impression on me. It goes as follows:

"Ten years ago I signed on at Motorcyclist magazine and began commuting to work on a motorcycle over the busiest freeways and streets of Los Angeles. In those 10 years of commuting, two staff members had commuting accidents, neither of which caused significant damage or pain. That's five to seven editors riding to work every working day for 10 years. If we were the survey panel, the conclusion would be that commuting on a motorcycle is an extremely safe way to get to work. And with the proper skills, it can be."

The article goes on to have some great tips on riding in urban areas. Here is a link to the article:
http://www.sportrider.com/ride/146_9508_motorcycle_riding_tips/index.html
 

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MBalmer said:
Does anyone have "over pants" that feel like good protection? I really don't like chaps.
I wear a pair of Joe Rocket Cleo mesh pants over jeans:
http://www.newenough.com/protective...rocket/ladies_cleo_mesh_motorcycle_pants.html

They're okay, but the zippers which run vertically up/down on the legs drive me crazy(one of them is stuck right now). Decent padding in the hips and armored knees, but sometimes they feel a bit bulky on me- the waist is cut waaay narrower than the hips/legs so they kinda balloon out around my butt- not attractive. Since they also fit loosely over my boots, I've hooked the mesh on a peg or lever a few times, especially when putting feet down or up again at/from a stop, but this has never caused any problems. I'm always running late to school, and the med students make fun of me for stripping these off in class after lecture's already begun, but it is nice just to have regular clothes underneath and not have to change. So, I guess overall- I'd recommend some brand of mesh or textile overpants, especially in warmer weather, but probably not these since there are so many other options.

I was really skeptical of mesh gear in general until the boy had a "little run in" with a deer and all of his mesh worked beautifully. I'm still considering getting a pair of leather pants since the bulk of my riding is on the freeway,... but then there's the issue of the Houston heat and cost. I always convince myself that the black leather "won't be that hot" before I ride and later curse myself the whole way.

I like those Dainese pants...
 

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ducatihotti said:
I think I will contact scorpion to find out for sure.
Lemme know if you find anything out... if they do have knee protection, I might try out the leather ones since they're perfed.
 

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Recently found someone who can sew/repair track gear. Took 2 days for me to realize she can modify my leathers. Upgrade to CE armor (or add it to the leather I bought as a newbie - no padding at all!!). Take in the extra material so things fit properly - not just for looks, but to keep the armor in the right places!!

It's suprising the amount of women's gear that has little or no padding in it. This story proves even the passengers need armor.

On a cheerful note : Unusually warm weather has me smiling from ear to ear. Even the boss let me go home early cause it's been so georgeous and he knows I want to ride the bike. Riding : Thursday night, Friday night, got plans for Sat & Sunday. My butt's gonna be sore, but I'll be beaming [cheeky]
 

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flighty said:
Lemme know if you find anything out... if they do have knee protection, I might try out the leather ones since they're perfed.
Heard that putting a long sleeved wicking shirt under the perfed leathers keeps you cool. Sounds counterintuitive, but this guy swears by it!! Anyone else heard that??
 

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lauramonster said:
Heard that putting a long sleeved wicking shirt under the perfed leathers keeps you cool. Sounds counterintuitive, but this guy swears by it!! Anyone else heard that??
Yes, true. I live in Arizona (read: triple digit temps from May through October), and we have very little humidity, so long sleeves actually protects you from dehydration here.
 

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I bet Underarmor makes some nice tights to put under pants too... great suggestion! I hadn't thought of that...
 

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lauramonster said:
This story proves even the passengers need armor.
[threadjack again]

I'm not faulting you for saying this, but this is the belief of SO many people who take pillions. Have you ever heard of a rider crashing, but the passenger staying on the bike? Why would a passenger need less protection? It makes no sense. If anything, the passenger should have MORE protection than the rider, since the passenger can come off without the rider coming off, and is therefore more likely to crash than the rider.
 

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I agree with Emily, to me if I have to compromise, it would be on my gear, not the passenger's.

Not only are they in the far more vulnerable position, they have no control over what happens. They have to put their trust in me.
 

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ducatihotti said:
This thread has turned very somber and disheartening from what had been just a conversation about gear and what to buy. I know the WHY is the most important part, and I am not in any way questioning or discounting the validity of any of the stories stated here...

.....but its kinda making me not want to ride :-\

Can we pep it up again? :)
+1 [thumbsup]
On another note, if any of you are in San Francisco, come by the Dainese Store. I just started working there on weekends. I'd be happy to set you up with the right gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
I want to post a link to a story about what happens when you crash without gear. It's pretty tough to read, so this is a warning if you have a weak stomach. But reading this made a lasting impression on me, and even to this day if I am tempted to ride without gear I think about this story. If you are going to take risks you should probably know the consequences. http://www.speedfreakinc.com/safety/extreme_roadrash_cause_effect_and_lesson_learned_2.html
[/quote]

I definitely think that this story will pop into my head if I am ever tempted to ride w/out gear. I didn't think I had a weak stomach until I read this but damn.. not complaining though, I think it's good to be aware of the consequences. Thanks for posting this story!
 

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Discussion Starter #54
msincredible said:
I agree with Emily, to me if I have to compromise, it would be on my gear, not the passenger's.

Not only are they in the far more vulnerable position, they have no control over what happens. They have to put their trust in me.
+1. I couldn't agree more. Couldn't live with the guilt if something happened to them.
 

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Emily said:
I'm not faulting you for saying this, but this is the belief of SO many people who take pillions. Have you ever heard of a rider crashing, but the passenger staying on the bike? Why would a passenger need less protection?
The first thing that pops into my head when I see a rider in gear and a passenger in street clothes is, "He doesn't really care about you, does he?" (It's almost always a male rider with a female passenger.) And I have to wonder when people keep a spare helmet so they can take random passengers too.

I have taken flack from people for my rule that I don't carry passengers unless they have a full set of properly fitting gear, but I'm stubborn and still don't. (On the upside, it's a good excuse when strange guys ask me for a ride.) The only time I make an exception is when the passenger is an experienced rider who customarily wears what I consider inadequate gear. I figure they know the risk and have chosen to accept that.
 

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ro-monster said:
The first thing that pops into my head when I see a rider in gear and a passenger in street clothes is, "He doesn't really care about you, does he?" (It's almost always a male rider with a female passenger.) And I have to wonder when people keep a spare helmet so they can take random passengers too.

I have taken flack from people for my rule that I don't carry passengers unless they have a full set of properly fitting gear, but I'm stubborn and still don't. (On the upside, it's a good excuse when strange guys ask me for a ride.) The only time I make an exception is when the passenger is an experienced rider who customarily wears what I consider inadequate gear. I figure they know the risk and have chosen to accept that.
[thumbsup] [thumbsup] Ro!

I literally gasped the other day when I saw a guy riding in t-shirt and jeans, with his female passenger wearing a tank top and short skirt. Yikes!

Desmoquattro is a safety (pardon the term) nazi. Before our first 2-up ride (across town), he gave me a safety briefing, then handed me earplugs, leather jacket, helmet and gloves. It didn't matter that the gear was 5 sizes too big. What mattered is that I wore it!
 

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There is no point to carrying a "spare" helmet, since every helmet fits differently and you need not only the correct size helmet, but the correct shape helmet. (Basically, if you have your lid on, tilt your head back. Grab the chin bar. If you can pull it down so the top of the face opening comes down on your nose, you need a smaller size or a different shape.) A rider would need to carry an assortment of helmets or reject pillions who didn't fit the helmet. That never happens. They carry a medium or a large, which will fit on 90% of female heads.
 
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