Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i bought a used red cowl not too long ago with some very minor scratches thinking that I would be able to fill them, prime and repaint to match my matte black. Before I do that though I was also going to look into having someone at a body shop or someplace like that do it for me unless the cost was too much. I was wondering just how easy a task like this is for a relative novice like myself? Does anyone have any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Painting would be the problem, unless you have experience. But as far as sanding and fixing those scratches, thats something you can do in your garage. Is this seat cowl plastic? Or is it fiberglass? If its plastic i would say leave it to the pro, if its fiberglass, try it yourself, a little sand paper, some bondo, and i would probably suggest a chemical paint stipper that is fiberglass safe. Any more quesitons feel free to ask, i could give you a more detailed write up if you would like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The cowl is plastic. I thought that would be a problem, but thought I'd ask anyway. The scratches are just a little too deep to be just sanded out. Too bad. I'll have to go around and get an estimate or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I thought I had read in an earlier thread about some guy priming his cowl, then using krylon matte black and clear coat. He said it was an exact match to his tank. Sounded easy to me but I'm not as sure now... Seems like something isn't right about that scenario.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
It the plastic is smooth to the touch(no ridges), just scratches, you can fill them with epoxy or bondo, then have it painted, or paint yourself like described in the above post with matte black krylon and clear. Just remember, if you fill with epoxy, small amounts at a time, several coats is better than a coat that is too thick cause sanding plastic and having a well finished product is a paint in the a$$.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
I recently repaired my cracked cowl to have a back up for the new one if it ever broke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Im sorry, but I am going to disagree. Bondo is going to be the easier way to repair the deep scratches, why go through all the effort to sand the whole seat cowl, or to use a polish on plastic when the scratches can be filled then painted over anyways? I may not be a 5 star member, but to me it just doesnt make any sense, but hey, do what you believe is the best way to get things done. Good luck with it, post pics when you have a finished project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
I said, IMHO.... Personally I don't like hack jobs on any fo my SH!T. So, to take the time and do it right so it comes out poifect is worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I said nothing about a Hack job, if people learned how and when to use bondo there wouldnt be this bad vestige for bondo, contrary to popular belief bondo is an excellent tool, some of the best in the business use it on a daily basis, even for show cars, go figure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Everyone is entitled to their own opinion and mine ;) I (personally) do not like bondo, I perfer lead work. On a Monster or anything of quality and value to anyone who has put time and money into something, I would (personally) not recommend it. BTW, my five star status has no bearing on my personal knowledge of monsters and cars, and I would prefer not to use Jeff and Martin's forum to get into a arguement over bondo :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
wow. Thanks for the advice. I will post pics when the job is done. I didn't know there were such feelings over bondo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I apologize, my white trash friends and I will no longer offer our hack job advice on simple scratch repair which has been done countless times over the years. -Done-
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
I'm hoping to find out how Jason Lowe came out fixing the scratches in my cowl. They were rather deep.

Jason, if you're reading this, please give us an update.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,723 Posts
FWIW, Bondo the product is not the greatest in the world. There are however body fillers that can be purchased at paint shops that will allow you to fill and sand the plastic will a little effort. These are quality materials, and not to be confused from Autozone type Bondo. Dahl_berg is right when he says this material has been used millions of times successfully. Where people screw up with filler is filling deep dents and dings which is not what the product was mean to do. I think with a little patience you could do a fine job with plastic filler.
Painting is not that difficult either. The matte black finish of the Dark models don't really require a superior technique to get good results.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Flexability was also my concern, plastics fillers before and it seems that if the piece would be twisted the fillers tended to pop back out. Thats why i suggested using a plastic glue or epoxy since the only reason they are being filled is so the cowl can be repainted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Luckily the scratches aren't in a place that would have much flex so I'm not too worried about that. I'll do some research this weekend.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
451 Posts
Well I haven't finished yet but this is what I am doing so far:

1) First block sanding the cowl to get the ridges down (and I am keeping as much of the dust as posible, more on this later). This is as far as I am right now.

2) Next I will be making a filler out of a two part flexable plastic bumper repair and the above dust (may need to make more dust from other like plastic). The dust is to add volume and strength (kind of like fiberglass strands...).

3) I will apply this like I would any other two part filler and then sand the cowl to as close as perfect as posible.

4) Prime with a high fill primer intended for plastic bumpers.

5) Sand and repeat step 4 and 5 as required, 400 then 600 grit.

4) Then paint it.

I am avoiding bondo (and the likes) because the part is plastic and I am worried about adhesion and the part flexing and cracking the bondo. I have repaired scratches in plastic bumpers with the above technique with some good results. I probably will not get it perfect but since it is a dark the paint will hide some of my usual hack work... I can always add some posser number boards to further hide my lack of skill.

I will post some picks when I am done, right now I am waiting for better weather since I try to avoid doing bodywork in my condo....

Scott, you haven't got the 5 I owe you becuase I have not sent it yet.... I didn't relize that I did not have any $5 US bills! I will send it after my next trip state side.

jl
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top