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My Monster is back today, after being at FBF all week for new tires.( I was making friends with the Speed Four all week!)

I am not an aggressive rider on the street and most my riding is back and forth to work. Is there a manual way of scrubbing in new tires.
 

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Now, I won't swear to it, but I'm pretty sure that I read here on the board about some people taking a sander to the tires to scrub off the mold release compound. Don't take that as gospel, but I think I remember that. :)
 
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Deb, You need to remove the mold release agent from the tire. The best way to scrub in a new bunn, is to take it slow, and gradually increase lean angle around the turns. I have heard of people using a scotch-brite pad, but I've no first hand experience with that approach. Just take it slow, and you'll be fine.

BTW, if you want to get rid of the chicken strips before the track day, I'd be glad to flog your bike around on Saturday! ;D
 

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Herb, if I let all the people who offer to "flog " my bike around to scrub the tires on Saturday, I will be putting new ones on with Team Pro Motion on Sunday!! LOL ;D [smiley=laugh.gif]
 

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doing it manually also lets you scrub your chicken strip
down as far as you like.
 

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I was really thinking of the scotch brite pad for the sides, cause my lean angle isn't the greatest.

I do think that one of the instructors from TPM will take your bike out for a lap or 2 to scrub them in.
 

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I use 220 grit sand paper to lightly scrub them in before a ride. I have heard the organic degreasers like orange clean work but have never tried that.
 
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The release agent on new tires is something that most newer riders are completely unaware of and has probably been the cause of many otherwise unexplained "get offs." It was never mentioned in my MSF course, nor by any of the dealers I have bought bikes from.

I have heard about using fine grit sand paper, but cleaning new tires with rubbing alcohol and taking it easy the first 50-100 miles has worked for me...so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well I got about 250 miles on my new tires, but the sides are still not scrubbed in, I think I will have to manually scrub that part in, or before track, let the instructor do it , or take it easy for a lap or two.
 

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Deb, I used a standard abrasive wheel in an angle grinder(Makita), with my rear wheel on it's axle sitting on jackstands. Just spin and sand, working the abrasive wheel across the tread surface. You can see when the rubber starts to heat up. It makes quite a mess of black rubber dust, so do it somehow so it's easier to clean up.

Here's a pic:


Spin it so that the dust goes toward the floor, and if you hold the grinder at the right angle, it'll help spin the tire as it sands.

Sorry no before and after pics of actually doing the tire. Got no spare hands to hold the camera.
 

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On another forum, this was recently discussed, and some of the more experienced riders noted that the mold release agent is a thing of the past, based on discussion with a tire manufacturer rep. I don't know any tire reps, but don't feel the need to dispute it. It seems to me that the problem is the pattern of the surface on a new tire. Is the effect the same? Don't know.

I've broken in tires just by taking it easy and gradually leaning more, it even worked when riding in the rain. It never takes any deliberate effort other than keeping it mellow for a bit.

On the track the tires need to be warmed up for the first laps anyway regardless of tire condition. That's an opportunity to scrub them in as well, again just by riding moderately. I believe some trackday organizers even offer a service of scrubbing new tires for you.
 

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I posted that mold release agents were not a factor anymore according to the Dunlop rep at a tire seminar at Laguna Seca during WSBK races. I do not risk it, I have more to lose than Dunlop.
I still take a wire wheel on a drill and spin my tires while bike is on a stand. I put the wire wheel against the tire letting it rotate the tire while pressing hard against the tire. Then let wire wheel move back and forth while wheel is spinning.
Tire rep stated that chemical cleaners like contact or brake cleaner would shorten the life of the tire. Not a factor for me as I usually change tires 2x/year or more. Usually 1-2 track days and my tires are toast, anyway.
 

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Don't worry about a thing. I will take care of your bike. You can follow me with the S4R to make sure I am nice to it....
 
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I'm not in any position to dispute the Dunlop tire rep, but when I had a new Dunlop D207 rear mounted on my Buell a few months ago the tread edges were as slick as snot with something. Surely the dealer didn't put Amorall on it ::)...God...I really shouldn't even mention THAT substance and tires in the same thread. :eek:

After confering with my legal department, I have decided to include the following disclaimer....

You should not, under any circumstances, use Armor All or any similar product on a motorcycle tire, regardless of how good it makes the tires look.
 

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I'm not in any position to dispute the Dunlop tire rep, but when I had a new Dunlop D207 rear mounted on my Buell a few months ago the tread edges were as slick as snot with something.
Errrmmm, a "new" D207? We haven't been able to get 207s here[1] for a couple of years now, they have been superceded by the 208s (which are now regarded as "old crap tire technology" by the people riding on Rennsports, Pilot Powers, and BT012SSs). I suspect your tire was "new old stock"...

We're also getting stories here about how Dunlop are no longer using wax as a mould release agent, and the tire retailers are bitching about it because they are now being told that new waxless tires have a shelf life on only 4 months...

big

[1] in Australia - maybe this is just a naming difference in different markets?
 

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Just ride it! Easy for the first 100-200 miles, moderate lean/speed to start.
SIMPLE as pie!
 

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Here's a before & after using the Makita Angle grinder to scuff my new front tire before reinstalling.


 

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I always just ride it. by the time you get a good heat cycle in it, the "wax, mold release, gorilla snot", whatever is gone. I have ridden Deals Gap like a bat outta heck on tires that were put on that morning, and only had 75mi. of super slab needed to get to the Gap. They never felt slick, or scary. When I do a track day, I intend to have the tires mounted on my other rims and not ridden on more than once, to and from work the day before the event. Deb, don't worry about it and ride. If you really want to do something "pro-active" about the unused section of rubber, take a blow torch to it, not melting it, but bring it up to temp, this way you haven't prematurely worn away some of your tire (like sandpaper will).
 
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