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I bought the Sato rearsets for my 696 which I plan to take to the track this year. They arrived today. The parts are great -- well machined and finished. The instructions are crap, basically, "Remove stock equipment. Install new rearsets." There are parts in the kit that I don't even know where they fit! :eek:

Anyone with experience with the Sato rearsets? Advice? Suggestions? Pics?

BTW, will the sidestand from a S2R fit on a 696? I have got to get that big lumpy thing off the bike to avoid grinding on it when on the track. I am thinking of just removing it for the track, then bolting it back on for street use. However, if I can find a small enough sidestand that can be mounted on the bike and doesn't stick out so far, I would go that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
On the Ducati.ms board a rider PM'd me pics of his installation (if you are here, thanks danaid). So now I understand installing the Sato rearsets -- amazing the insight a picture can provide.

Any suggestions on a replacement for the sidestand?
 

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Here are the pics from Dan (danaid) over on Ducati.ms. I'll post some after installing mine.




 

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Here are close ups of mine. Took a while over four hours with most of the time on the RHS. Getting all the stuff associated with the rear brake squared away took time.



I know the brake reservoir is tilted. I can't quite see how it have it level and have the line from it to the master cylinder not end up with a kink in it. I will have to mess with that some more.

I went for a short ride. The ergos are much better than stock for near-aggressive riding. I could easily shift from side to side and the pegs grip the boots great. I am happy!
 

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Dr.D, did you have to bleed the rear brake when you installed the RHS foot control. I'm looking to get into a set of the Sato's in the next month and want to get an idea of what i have in store for me. Thanks for sharing the info and pics of the install.
 

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Sato rear set installation

Having real problems with this install. The left installed like cake in less than 30 minutes, but the right side is a friggin nightmare.

Did you have to reroute the brake line? I can't quite see from your photos how you did this?... Mine seems really short and I cannot get the right rear set bolted on because the brake line prevents it from reaching.

How do you install the rake light switch? Did you have to splice this?

Great set and very well built--if I can only get the right side installed! The instructions SUCK!
 

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Just an FYI here, parts for "racing applications" always come with poor instructions. There are generally two accepted reasons for this. Reason one: They only want qualified professionals to make the parts swap as there is a significant liability in the fact that you could do this wrong, even with good instructions. Same reason why Brembo refuses to sell $50 rebuild kits. Brembo just does not want the liability of having someone beyond their control rebuilding brakes. Reason two: By not giving you actual instructions it sets it up as a buyer beware transaction. They send you a box of parts that can be assembled into a product. If some thing goes wrong with the assembly that causes an issue later, you were the one that chose to assemble it like that and install it. You'll find that most any part you ever buy will not come with any type of instruction or the most vague instructions outlining some details of the install. Again it's all about legal liability. If there are no instructions and you decide to install the product, then you are accepting the product as is and making the determination yourself to install it whether you are qualified or not. Years ago I can recall being told that most legal contracts or warranties would typically include a spelling error somewhere as a back door type excuse to help protect them in a lawsuit. The idea was that if someone got hurt and sued, the lawyers could say that with all due respect, the guarantee had errors in that are not enforceable. So by not explicitly telling you just how that brake rod assembly goes together and just how to set the free play, when you go for that first ride and overhear the rear brake because of drag and you lock it up, dump the bike and then watch as it bursts into flame, yep can't hold them responsible. By now you are thinking, wow this guy is full of **** except this exact scenario has played out many times on this forum from people diddling with their rear brakes.


Now onto the install. I love my Sato II's on my Sport Classic PS. Much smoother shifting and no more slippery pegs.

I had to loosen my brake line from the small clamp on my swingarm, not sure if yours is held down but I would assume it is. I then had to flip the banjo around until I was able to find an appropriate location for it and then used a Goodridge brake banjo like you probably bought. Once I got that set I went back and tightened the hold clamp. You do need to splice the wires. It's easy. There are two wires and it does not matter which color goes to which as they will be open until the brake pressure closes the contacts. I removed the old switch, cut the wires at about the halfway mark. Then I trimmed about one inch from one of the wires and staggered the new brake switch the same way. I then cut a piece of heat shrink that would cover from the switch to the connector and forced it over the connector side and held it away from the cut wires with a little alligator clamp. Then I soldered the wires together so that the joints were staggered an inch apart and then slid the heat shrink over it all. I did not actually shrink it down. When you look at it, it looks totally stock. I then put all of my left hand side parts in a sandwich bag, put all my right hand parts in a sandwich bag, and then put both of those bags into a 1 gallon ziplock bag. I then purchased a clean used brake switch for $10 on ebay and slipped it into the bag. That way should I ever choose to sell the bike I have all the original parts that go with it as well as being organized.

Another tip, use blue or green Loctite on the bolts. Yes this is a thing. I wasn't 100% sure if I liked my position and wanted to ride a day or two and then decide if I wanted to make a change or not. Nope. First ride out I lost a bolt that held the left side on and lost the ability to shift. I was on a highway, thankfully, and didn't need to shift for awhile. When I exited I pulled in the clutch and pulled off the road. I was able to use a zip tie to get me to a hardware store and buy a replacement. I immediately went home and pulled it all apart and put some Loctite on every bolt and then torqued them all back into place. No problems since. Don't use red.
 

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Thanks, Caferacermike,

I certainly get your point about the rationale for giving scant if any directions on this stuff. It's guys like me who they probably don't want installing their own safety sensitive stuff, like brake controls! Slowly getting to know my bike though, and plugging through this is teaching me a lot.

My problem is that the brakeline, no matter how I flip the banjo bolt, will not reach far enough to let me bolt the rearset into place. From your pics, it seems your brake line is directed to the right of the brake fluid reservoir. I may need to remove the banjo bolt and brake line and re-route it the same way, just to the left of the crank case.

Sorry for the stupid questions. I'm a newbie as you can tell. In fact, not sure how to post pics to this forum, but will try.

Thanks!

Thanks for the tips.
 

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Mine is different than yours,




I did have to force it. You could always just buy a little bit longer hose. That would be best. Speigler and others will make whatever you want for a decent price. I'm converting my 900ss to radial master cylinders and needed different bends in my banjo bolts so I just went and hit the scrap bin at my local shop. For $20 in beer I left with 12 hoses. You might try this.
 

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Sato rear set install - moving beyond the struggle

Thanks, Caferacer Mike and all,

I love this forum!

After much struggling and after pondering your words of advice (as well as studying your pics). I realized that--duhhh!!!--I was doing things wrong. My banjo has a 90-degree bend in it that made rotating the rearset counterclockwise enough to line up the bolt holes simply impossible. After much struggling, I simply flipped the banjo 180 degrees so the bemd in the banjo turns in the other direction (toward the brake fluid reservoir) and --oila!--no more struggle at all. (I could have just purchased a new banjo without the bend as Caferacermike suggested, but I was impatient. Also, the brake line seems to lie to better with the bend.). I also rerouted the brake line anterior to the bike frame post as Caferacermike and DrD show in their pics. It was a "Oh! Like, duhhhhhhhh!" moment once I did this. ;)

In terms of the brake fluid line to the reservoir, my Sato set came with a little two-hole space piece made of the same material as the rear set that can be used to position the fluid reservoir about 2 cm further back. I also have the new Rizoma Next reservoir which is elliptical in cross-section, and I ended up using that instead. That is one beautiful sweet bit of kit and allows the brake fluid line to lie further back and further inside the frame. In addition, the line exits the reservoir at the bottom, taking any potential for kinks out of the equation.

Thanks, all! Thank God for this forum!
 

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Sato Rearsets

I've had my Sato Rearsets for several years and I really like them. I had no issues with installation, everything bolted right on. Your feet are stuck to the pegs far better than the stock rearsets.
 

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Just an FYI here, parts for "racing applications" always come with poor instructions. There are generally two accepted reasons for this. Reason one: They only want qualified professionals to make the parts swap as there is a significant liability in the fact that you could do this wrong, even with good instructions. Same reason why Brembo refuses to sell $50 rebuild kits. Brembo just does not want the liability of having someone beyond their control rebuilding brakes. Reason two: By not giving you actual instructions it sets it up as a buyer beware transaction. They send you a box of parts that can be assembled into a product. If some thing goes wrong with the assembly that causes an issue later, you were the one that chose to assemble it like that and install it. You'll find that most any part you ever buy will not come with any type of instruction or the most vague instructions outlining some details of the install. Again it's all about legal liability. If there are no instructions and you decide to install the product, then you are accepting the product as is and making the determination yourself to install it whether you are qualified or not. Years ago I can recall being told that most legal contracts or warranties would typically include a spelling error somewhere as a back door type excuse to help protect them in a lawsuit. The idea was that if someone got hurt and sued, the lawyers could say that with all due respect, the guarantee had errors in that are not enforceable. So by not explicitly telling you just how that brake rod assembly goes together and just how to set the free play, when you go for that first ride and overhear the rear brake because of drag and you lock it up, dump the bike and then watch as it bursts into flame, yep can't hold them responsible. By now you are thinking, wow this guy is full of **** except this exact scenario has played out many times on this forum from people diddling with their rear brakes.


Now onto the install. I love my Sato II's on my Sport Classic PS. Much smoother shifting and no more slippery pegs.

I had to loosen my brake line from the small clamp on my swingarm, not sure if yours is held down but I would assume it is. I then had to flip the banjo around until I was able to find an appropriate location for it and then used a Goodridge brake banjo like you probably bought. Once I got that set I went back and tightened the hold clamp. You do need to splice the wires. It's easy. There are two wires and it does not matter which color goes to which as they will be open until the brake pressure closes the contacts. I removed the old switch, cut the wires at about the halfway mark. Then I trimmed about one inch from one of the wires and staggered the new brake switch the same way. I then cut a piece of heat shrink that would cover from the switch to the connector and forced it over the connector side and held it away from the cut wires with a little alligator clamp. Then I soldered the wires together so that the joints were staggered an inch apart and then slid the heat shrink over it all. I did not actually shrink it down. When you look at it, it looks totally stock. I then put all of my left hand side parts in a sandwich bag, put all my right hand parts in a sandwich bag, and then put both of those bags into a 1 gallon ziplock bag. I then purchased a clean used brake switch for $10 on ebay and slipped it into the bag. That way should I ever choose to sell the bike I have all the original parts that go with it as well as being organized.

Another tip, use blue or green Loctite on the bolts. Yes this is a thing. I wasn't 100% sure if I liked my position and wanted to ride a day or two and then decide if I wanted to make a change or not. Nope. First ride out I lost a bolt that held the left side on and lost the ability to shift. I was on a highway, thankfully, and didn't need to shift for awhile. When I exited I pulled in the clutch and pulled off the road. I was able to use a zip tie to get me to a hardware store and buy a replacement. I immediately went home and pulled it all apart and put some Loctite on every bolt and then torqued them all back into place. No problems since. Don't use red.
Well stated. I have a Land Cruiser that I have modded, and some very expensive very important parts have come with nearly incomprehensible instructions which alludes to your point. The last one was a set of bolt in expedition drawers with slide tops for a refrigerator, and it took me and a buddy about 20 minutes of head scratching till we just chucked the manual and tore into it. These were $2k+ Australian high end pieces too :rolleyes:
 
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