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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am pondering the question whether a S2R 1000 will be too much for a first time monster owner, as I hope to be in a few short months. I am fairly new to riding (couple months) and now am on a Honda CB250 to get my skills up to par. I feel like I have pretty good throttle, clutch, and steering control, so after a few months I am going to upgrade to a monster. The question is which one? Anybody been in a similar bind and want to share some advice?
 

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Ya know, the throttle twist both ways. What I mean is the weight is not that different, the power from 695-S4R is all manageable. Get what fits your pocket book and don't let the additional power worry you.
 

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Sounds like your on the right path to me.Since you've been riding __ amount of miles.The only thing that would worry me for you would be trottle control.Everything else is close to the same or insignificant,handling,top speed ,brakes,...Just be smoooooooth. [thumbsup]


power management difficulty scale for monsters IMO,
1------2-------3-------4--------5-------6------7------8-------9------10
695 S2R S2R1 S4R S4RS
 

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IMHO:

S2R 800 (-) wussy front brakes that need replacing
S2R 800 (-) wussy front brakes that need replacing edited to repeat this important point... brake upgrade can cost $1000
S2R 800 (+) amazingly well done "carburetion" from the EFI, giving supremely smooth in town manners. This also makes a grin come on my face everytime I ride my S2R800.
S2R 800 (+) lower rpm torque feels more powerful than an 800 "should be"
S2R 800 (+) wet clutch with slipper - I like the quiet from it
S2R 800 (+) arrow pipes sound awesome and don't require changing the mixture. (likely same for any exhaust mod)
S2R 800 (+) ultra light clutch pull
S2R 800 (+/-) "only" goes 135 mph


S2R1K (+) comes with real brakes.
S2R1K (+) comes with adjustable forks, tho I think this isn't a great concern
S2R1K (+) more power
S2R1K (+) dry clutch
S2R1K (-) mega stiff clutch lever pull that even Yoyodyne slave cylinder couldn't tame. Many S2R1K owners remove a couple clutch springs from the pressure plate. (wtf? - that shouldn't be required)
S2R1K (-) the engine is very vibrate-y and shudder-y. I've ridden all kinds of Ducatis for a decade and it took me a little bit to get used to it. Thankfully, all the magazine I've read talked about it, so I was able to dismiss the vibes.
S2R1K (-) deceptive power delivery. The 1000 feels weak in the same low rev band where the 800 feels so strong. Stepping from 800 to 1000 left me underwhelmed.
S2R1K (+) when really caned, the 1000 can get up and go. You've got to try hard, but it'll happen.
S2R1K (+) goes faster than 135 mph
S2R1K (+) gets better fuel economy than 800 (and thus range) when ridden at speeds consistnely over 90 mph. On a 300 mile ride, the S2R800 ran out of fuel, while 1000 made that extra 5 miles to the gas station.


Knowing what I know right now, I believe I would get an 800 again if I could "start over" from this moment. The 800's "fun factor" really makes the bike for me. I was jaded and racing killed my motorcycling inner child. My S2R 800 brought it back.


Again, all my humble opinion.
;D Chris
 

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I have a '04 M1000s (essentially same bike as S2R1K) that I bought new over the winter a few years ago. Was looking for the 800 but dealer didn't have any more leftovers and I got a good deal on the 1000s.

Frankly, the 1000 is more bike than anyone needs for 95% of street riding. It's overkill - I spend 90% of my time in 3rd/2nd/1st gear and with the engine making between 4000 and 5500 RPM. Unless you're going to do lots of trackdays and you're a really good rider, the S2R 800 is going to be plenty of bike for all types of riding...

Chris did a wonderful job of listing his pros/cons - I concur. WRT his point on the vibes, the 1000 isn't as smooth as the smaller engine, but I also have figured how to live with it the majority of time. If I sell the bike in the next year, it'll be because I'm tired of the vibes - that's my only complaint with the bike.

If you'll be spending much time in stop & go traffic you don't want the 1000 - heavy clutch and the FI enrichens the engine when it's hot...gets really vibey until it cools down.

I wish they made an 800 Multistrada... :'(
 

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I have the s2r800 and the only thing that I would like is the open clutch you can have on the s2r1k. I like the power band better on the 800 than the 1k, it is easier to ride in legal speeds.. The 1k does not feel like it has the same low end grunt as the 800, and that did make me very surprised, mine pull good from 2500 to 7000, after that it is getting noticeable weaker (probably due to missing pcIII). The 1k started to pull at about 4k and did it so all the way to red.
I could do with the better brakes on the 800 but so far I have not needed it, you just start to brake sooner, thats all ;)

I have cored cans with open airbox and did not need a pcIII, i would most likely get better performance with one, but it has not been needed yet.
With this said I think you get a bike that is a little more forgiving when it comes to engine related mods versus the 1k. But this is only my opinion from reading posts on the board about people needing to do this and that due to a exhaust mod, or airbox.

Either way you get a great bike, and in the end, it is only you who can make a decision if the bike is good for you or not.

/H
 

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chris said:
IMHO:

S2R1K (-) the engine is very vibrate-y and shudder-y. I've ridden all kinds of Ducatis for a decade and it took me a little bit to get used to it. Thankfully, all the magazine I've read talked about it, so I was able to dismiss the vibes.

I recently got a used '05 M1000s and woud like to compare my experience with yours. At what RPM and gear do you feel the vibration?


S2R1K (-) deceptive power delivery. The 1000 feels weak in the same low rev band where the 800 feels so strong.

What range in the rev band do you feel this weakness?
 

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for me it felt that the 800 had more power in 2500-3500, but maybe it was because the 1k vibrated more...

/H
 

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Aside from what Chris and others have said about the differences they've experienced, let me add mine.

I have an '04 M800. When it was still completely stock, I felt that as long as you were on surface streets (not highway/interstate), it was easy to keep within legal limits. The bike felt quite happy at 60 - 65 MPH in 5th gear. You would have to downshift to 4th or 3rd to squirt by cagers getting in your way. Doing country roads it was light and very manageable. Unless you are into big HP numbers, you don't have to look for more. After installing high pipes, (no PCIII) the bike became more entertaining and faster (because I kept on whacking the throttle open to hear the pipes roar [laugh]) It is now for sale.

That said, I recently bought an '05 M100S. The seat height is a little taller and the weight a little bit more but not too noticeable. I wanted the adjustable levers and suspension and in my case the aluminum swingarm. Finally, I wanted the dry clutch. But that's just me.

The bike has high pipes, modded airbox and a PCIII. It responds quicker and pulls stronger especially past 5K. IMHO, below 5K, both bikes are close enough to be almost identical. I do have to point out that the 800 has a front/rear sproket ratio of 15/42 vs the 1000 of 15/39. My 1000 has 10 more peak HP (85 vs 75) and 6 lbs-ft more peak torque than my 800 (different dynos different days).

I'll repeat what others have said: Both bikes are a hoot. The type of riding and rider you are along with your budget should determine which one you buy. One thing though, if you can swing it financially and you want an S2R1K over an S2R because of shall we say "intangibles", don't do what I did. In the end, as long as you are well informed, go for the bike that you want.


Hope that helps,
cdc
 

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How about the SportClassic models? They seem mostly comparable to the S2R 1000, assuming you like the SportClassic styling (I do!).

The only problem is that I get the Sport1000 and the GT1000 confused.
 

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I found Chris' post very interesting and for the time he has obviously spent on each I can not dispute his opinions.

I may be in the Ford Chevy thing here, ya know, ya own a Ford and it is the best, ya own a Chevy.....

Anyway I only rode an 800 S2R for a Demo ride at Mid Ohio in 05 and purchased a S2R 1000 last December and have put approx. 7500 miles on it. I think the 800 I demoed was not Set up right 'cause it felt very "lumpy" to me. It ran nice and I did like the light clutch pull but I am glad I have the 1000.

The clutch pull thing I think is waaay over rated. I have done my share of city riding and 200 mile plus days on the 1000 and have had no pain or fatigue in the clutch hand. Anyone who has ridden classic iron would not complain about any modern hydraulic clutch. You want to get "Popeye arm" ride a bevel drive 900 Super Sport for an afternoon...you'll have someting to compare true clutch hand fatigue with.

On the other hand I think the adjustable suspension is a valid plus. OK so do I contradict myself? How many old bikes had adjustable suspension? OK so it wasn't as easy to do but different shocks, springs, fork oil...you could do some adjusting and I usually did. I am far from fully understanding suspension set-up but I did have to adjust the S2R from the factory settings when I got it...it was nice to be able to call my dealer, tell him the handling symptoms I was experiencing and get some guidance for the fix. Adjustable anything is a big plus in my mind.

Power and power delivery and vibration: Jumping from a four valve Duck to the Monster, vibration is very noticeable. If the 1000 is your only bike, you will quickly get used to the vibration...it is minor IMO. I never get buzzy hands and I can put 100 miles in the saddle w/o numb or painful butt. Power is more than satisfactory from my 1000. I have never felt that the power delivery was weak down low? Perhaps I just wind through that area quickly getting into the meat of the power band to really notice it.

It was interesting to read the fuel economy difference Chris noted. I get great gas milage on the S2R 1000! I have the Spark CAT eliminator pipe and Arc Fabrication cans. My dealer has set-up the bike to run well with this configuration. I seldom get less than 50 MPG and have gotten high 50's, near 60 at times.

I can't make up your mind for you, nor do I want to, just hope my input may be of some value.

Good luck with your choice...whichever it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow. [clap] Thanks for all the helpful advice. Now I feel the decision is even more complicated than I originally thought. These are all great tools to work with because there is no substitute for actual riding experience on each bike. I will be spending about 50% of the time on city roads here in Santa Barbara, but the rest will be open roads. It seems like each bike has its advantages and disadvantages and that in the end, I'll be just as happy no matter which one I choose.

Thanks again. [thumbsup]
 

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Woo 900s...

Jokes aside, it's my 900 than made me notice the 'deceptive power' on the 1000DS motor. I Demo'd one of the sport classics with that engine, and it left me feeling flat. Definetly smoother than the 900... But was almost too clincal.. just didn't seem fun. The 900 can be a bit harsh, brutish motor at times... but it's got soul.

Also I should note, I rode the sport classic right after an S4R, and the SCs throttle calbe was a touch off (thats a pet peve of mine) so I never felt at all comfy on the bike, and may have been a little reserved on my engine usage. I didn't ride teh s2r 800 that was availibe that day, wish i had so I could give you bakc to back thoughts...

But as has been said, the 800 is a nice motor, jsut the bike lacks some of the brake and suspension goodies of it's bigger brother... But with the price difference and some wheeling and dealing once could outfit the 800 w/ comprible brakes and suspenders w/o a huge dent in the bank book.
 
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