Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
+1 on the leaning. this bike has great neutral balance for a non SBK, but you'll want to learn to move around a lot. Start little and gradually increase your lean as you learn the feel of the bike.

I'll add that a slipper clutch is a mighty good idea, especially if you're keen on "tweesties". Downshifting on the S4RS has (for me anyway) a much greater effect on slowing this bike than any other I've owned and potentially causes (some interesting) rear wheel hop. I'm not sure if it's the forward oriented weight or massive amounts of engine braking the Testestretta provides, but even consciously trying to mitigate with body positioning and clutch management- the more aggressive you get the more you'll remember this comment. 'Grats on a wise bike choice! [thumbsup]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
934 Posts
c_rex said:
Downshifting on the S4RS has (for me anyway) a much greater effect on slowing this bike than any other I've owned and potentially causes (some interesting) rear wheel hop....trying to mitigate with body positioning and clutch management- the more aggressive you get the more you'll remember this comment. 'Grats on a wise bike choice! [thumbsup]
That's a big +1 for me too! Rear wheel chrip's been a big issue for me and the S4RS had forces me to get off my lazy bum and learn to match engine rev....I've been wondering if a 1k investment in slipper clutch should be moved higher up on my to-do list.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
934 Posts
Aztec said:
I'm curious what suspension changes you suggest for a 155lb rider on a stock S2R800 with clip-ons.
It that 155 lbs normal, or with full gear? If normal and you wear full leather gear and boot, you could be close to 165lbs which is pretty close to the weight range a stock S4RS is set for. If full loaded, then you will likely need to back-off the preload a bit to increase sag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45,105 Posts
How aggressiveley do you guys blip on downshifts? I've never had the tail wag or chirp, but others swear by their slipper clutches.
I thought for sure it would wag coming down for turn one at VIR, but even from high speed on the straight and blipping so the next lower gear is high in the rpm range (nine-ish) it was solid. Maybe I'm just really really slow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Statler said:
How aggressiveley do you guys blip on downshifts? I've never had the tail wag or chirp, but others swear by their slipper clutches.
I thought for sure it would wag coming down for turn one at VIR, but even from high speed on the straight and blipping so the next lower gear is high in the rpm range (nine-ish) it was solid. Maybe I'm just really really slow.
I do it by feel, never look at the actual rpms. And then I rode a BMW R1200s this weekend and chirped the rear tire on nearly EVERY downshift. Ahhhh, so my slipper clutch actually DOES do something. :)

I don't think the S2R800 really revs all that freely, so throttle blips aren't as easy as they could be. On the Daytona 675, for example, where the motor is super silky, it's second nature and cake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
CDawg said:
It that 155 lbs normal, or with full gear? If normal and you wear full leather gear and boot, you could be close to 165lbs which is pretty close to the weight range a stock S4RS is set for. If full loaded, then you will likely need to back-off the preload a bit to increase sag.
I weigh about 152, and loaded with leather and helmet am probably low 160s.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
439 Posts
Aztec said:
I weigh about 152, and loaded with leather and helmet am probably low 160s.
FWIW, go to www.onthethrottle.com and navigate to suspension, ducati, model.

There you will find suspension guru dave moss evaluate three different riders/weights vs. the stock setup. Some of the results are contrary to the "all ducatis are setup for 150lb riders" lore.

Hats off to dave for compiling such a "database" of showroom bikes.

BK
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
642 Posts
Just stumbled across this thread and as an owner of a 2007 S4RS I have learnt heaps just by reading your posts. SC thanks for the tips - once again I feel like I owe you.

The bike is amazing and you're right, you learn a little more about it every time you ride it. i find the challenge is to stay "in tune" enough to pick up on what the bike is doing and how it is responding rather than just riding it. I will struggle to test the limits of this bike - I'm not that skillful - then again I'm not sure many are.

But I look forward to the weekend when I'm out on it again and start changing weight distribution and ride position, just to learn a little more.

Thanks again one and all! [thumbsup]

jas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Reviving this thread. Thanks all. I've been riding Japanese sports and sports tourers for the past 30 years, and just last month bought my first Duc, a 2004 S4R. I wanted character, and something that would be very different to my Yam Roadliner 1900 to take advantage of all the twisty roads around my place in the picturesque Adelaide Hills, South Australia.

I used to be fairly quick and smooth on my ZX6R and KR-1S last century, but the S4R has a more aggressive throttle cam, poorer fuelling down low and what feels like a nearly non-existent flywheel. Consequently I'm struggling a bit with snatchy power laydown through the tighter corners. It doesn't help that I've been riding the Roadliner so often recently and that thing has a flywheel effect like a John Deere.

I'll try Shadowchaser's tips relating to getting my bodyweight forward and inside, and try to finish all my braking earlier so I can carry a bit of throttle through the bends. I'm thinking perhaps the suspension needs dialling in for me. I'm 6'0" and 210lb, and the guy I bought it from was my height but maybe 165lb dripping wet. The bike doesn't feel nose up, but nothing does compared to a cruiser with mini apes and forward controls. It also has a bar raiser kit, probably moving the bars up around 1.75" from stock. At 47 years old, I'm happy enough with that. The old neck won't love craning to see where I'm going if I drop the bars back to stock :)

Any further tips on smoothing out the throttle? I also find the engine braking on this 996 is far more noticeable than on any of my Jap 4s, and haven't got used to that yet. It's coming into winter here and the roads are nearly always damp when I'm riding to and from work, so it's not that confidence inspiring to feel the rear skipping a bit while I'm trying to learn the bike. Even closing the throttle without downshifting gives strong deceleration.

How much clutch feathering should I be incorporating into my hills riding? I notice some of you are fitting slipper clutches, which sounds expensive. Or do I just need to climb around the bike more and carry more corner speed to smooth it all out? Probably.

Cheers all,
Nathan
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top