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hello,

i just bought 2007 monster S4Rs and so far put about 350 mellow miles on it. The bike is amazing around tweesties, but it is a very new machine to me, because i have never owned italian bike before.
Some questions i have about riding this bike, i know with time and more seat time i will answer them, but still would like to hear from others.

Bike seemngly or rather apparently sits high, this throws me off around the corners, because i dont know how much more i can safely lean it. With stock bike height, do people usually put a knee down on monsters? Not that im going to do it on the street, i just want to get a perspective.

Also, steering feels too "easy", too free or loose, not sure whats the best term to describe it, but then again, i might need more seat time to re-train myself from my jap bike.

Please, share your monster riding techniques/thoughts..

Thanks
 

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tomq said:
hello,

i just bought 2007 monster S4Rs and so far put about 350 mellow miles on it. The bike is amazing around tweesties, but it is a very new machine to me, because i have never owned italian bike before.
Some questions i have about riding this bike, i know with time and more seat time i will answer them, but still would like to hear from others.

Bike seemngly or rather apparently sits high, this throws me off around the corners, because i don't know how much more i can safely lean it. With stock bike height, do people usually put a knee down on monsters? Not that im going to do it on the street, i just want to get a perspective.

Also, steering feels too "easy", too free or loose, not sure whats the best term to describe it, but then again, i might need more seat time to re-train myself from my jap bike.

Please, share your monster riding techniques/thoughts..

Thanks
Ciao Tom.

You have purchased IMHO what is one of the greatest all around bikes there is. [thumbsup]

First thing to ask you is if your Sag, Compression and Rebound settings are set properly for your weight.?.

Stock the S4Rs is sprung for a 160lb rider. After being unable to get enough preload dialed in to have my bike operating in its sweet spot (The upper 1/3 of its total range) and having actually bottomed my suspension a few times when really pushing it hard on a very rough road. I changed my fork and rear springs to a 250lb aggressive rate springs, and now she is perfect for my 6'3" 215lb frame.

As far as feeling very light / hyper sensitive in steering, and riding high in the front, this is normal for most monsters when stock.

The wider flat bars and the more upright riding position take some getting used to when coming off of a repli-racer with clip-ons.

Lighten your grip on the bars, and use allot of body English. IE: keep your upper torso way forward and to the inside of the corner directly over the grip nearest the inside of the corner. Counter-steering and bar inputs on these bikes are very light / touchy compared to a clip on equipped repli-racer.

The bike responds as much if not more to body position and weight transfer, and throttle inputs, as it does steering inputs. Proper weight distribution really settles these bikes immensely.

Depending on how tall or rather inseam challenged you are, the easiest fix to get more weight over the front is to have the adjustable rear ride height link raised 1". This will give the front a more planted feel especially under throttle. It will also make the turn in much easier and sharper. You only have to think about turning and they turn. They almost FALL into corners. (Note: If your rear compression is set too soft the bike will transfer too much weight to the rear (squatting under throttle) and causes it to run wide also.) (Too much compression damping on the forks gives the bike a nose high attitude and will also cause it to drift wide in the corners.)

Even with the bike set up and dialed in, the wide handle bars offer tremendous leverage (this is the majority of the lightness you are feeling.) You have to retrain yourself to have a very light touch on the bars. Small bar inputs have immediate and substantial results. Also holding on too tightly instead of using your abdominal muscles and legs to grip the bike can cause a slight weave that is rider input induced. If you still cannot get use to the added leverage you can add a steering damper, or clip-ons to negate the effect.

When adjusting your damping make all of your adjustments in small increments and take notes as to how it feels to you as well as how the bike is responding to the adjustment. There is no common setting that works for everyone, and has allot to do with your body type and your style of riding.

You can easily drag a knee on an Rs once the bike is dialed in. It takes much less effort to do on the monster than on a repli-racer, but it is a different feel to the hanging off position also. You'll feel your hands will be much higher in relation to your upper torso than on a clip-on equipped bike.

Take the time to get her dialed in and you will love her. You'll get used to the lightened steering after riding her a bit so don't rush to slap a damper on her till you get everything set up for you and your riding style.

Putting a damper on too early can mask problems with your settings, and in turn hamper the dial in process.

Swapping to clip-ons while improving the bikes for lack of a better term "track manners", will have a negative effect on it's comfort in long distance stints.

Once set up the S4Rs' Trellis frame is good enough to ride the bike completely off of its wheels. It's only limiting factor is the riders skill, and I for one am having an absolute blast TRYING to tap into even half of the actual outright potential of the S4Rs package. [laugh]

<Edit> I just noticed you also own a turbo Busa. That explains ALLOT!!! [laugh] [laugh] [laugh]

I used to own a 99' Busa, and the Rs handles and responds much differently. More sensitive to set up, yet much lighter and more nimble. Much more sensitive to throttle inputs.

Where you have to really crank on the Busa to compensate for the higher weight and less bar leverage, and a mile long rock stable wheel base to hustle it through the twisties. The Rs has the same hypersensitive feel of an R6, but with even more bar leverage, less front end weight bias, and only a slightly longer more stable wheelbase in relation to an R6.

I can see how this is a big change for you coming off of a long low heavy Busa. Once you get used to it you'll love it!

I actually find it infinately more entertaining than my old Busa. It doesn't have the outright terminal velocity of the Busa, but with the full Termi kit its not off by much, and accelerates almost as hard as a stock Busa. It's a real challenge to keep the front on the ground and take full advantage of its power to weight!

While the stock Busa wheelies easily the Termi equipped Rs wheelies even easier! >:D >:D >:D

Very different creatures, from completely opposite ends of the sport bike spectrum.

I'll bet you've added an extended swing arm to harness the power of your turbo Busa. This would only magnify the differences you are noticing between the two bikes. ;)

Hope this helps. ~SC
 

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SC,

fanstatsic input man! Greatly appriciated! [thumbsup]

yes, busa is lowered and stretched, have tires for land speed, so taking her to the cannyons was a challenge :D, it still rides good around the corners lol.

The S4Rs is stock, not a single thing has been changed, i will start tweaking things and dial her in after 600 miles is over, but im blown away how nibble and easy this bike is.

Im 6'1 and 250lbs, i hope that springs and shocks that come with the bike will be a ble to accommodate my weight and aggressive street riding, im not going to turn this baby into a track bike.
 

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Shadowchaser's response was excellent as usual.

He is a smooth and fast rider and I look forward to riding with him again.

Only thing I might add is that with the "sit up and beg" riding position of a monster compared to a repliracer, it is easy to "get behind the bike" when cornering hard. What I mean by that is when cornering, you tend to stay up high and react to the bike instead of being mentally further ahead through the corner. Also exaggerates how far you feel you're leaning.

I believe experienced sport riders can sit wherever or however and have no problem with this, but it is an adjustment nonetheless with a monster, especially with one that still is a bit nose-high.

One thing I find helped is to really pay attention to getting your body down over the tank when cornering. Getting your chest down over the tank totally changes how you feel the bike.

Here's a Ducati press release shot:
 

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Statler said:
Shadowchaser's response was excellent as usual.

He is a smooth and fast rider and I look forward to riding with him again.

Only thing I might add is that with the "sit up and beg" riding position of a monster compared to a repliracer, it is easy to "get behind the bike" when cornering hard. What I mean by that is when cornering, you tend to stay up high and react to the bike instead of being mentally further ahead through the corner. Also exaggerates how far you feel you're leaning.

I believe experienced sport riders can sit wherever or however and have no problem with this, but it is an adjustment nonetheless with a monster, especially with one that still is a bit nose-high.

One thing I find helped is to really pay attention to getting your body down over the tank when cornering. Getting your chest down over the tank totally changes how you feel the bike.

Here's a Ducati press release shot:

wow, i jsut went out and tried to position myself like you suggested and the bike just "streams" into the turn without any effort, this is freaking fantastic - there is a free mod right there, and who said driver mod isnt big deal :D!!!

Thanks guys!
 

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tomq said:
wow, i jsut went out and tried to position myself like you suggested and the bike just "streams" into the turn without any effort, this is freaking fantastic - there is a free mod right there, and who said driver mod isnt big deal :D!!!

Thanks guys!
Very Cool!!! [clap] [thumbsup] >:D

They require conscious weight distribution, but once you know what the bike likes its a whole different world. Don't worry about the Stock Ohlins forks and shocks, they are extreemely good. I think only the Matris forks and shocks might be a tad better in the stiction dept. ;)

At your height and weight, and especially if you carry more than just yourself on the bike, you will most likely find yourself wanting the heavier springs at some point.

The Fork springs and the rear shock springs are only $250.00 from Ohlins, and make a world of difference in the bikes compliance when dialed in.

I found that on Maya even with the preload front and rear cranked up full stiff that I still had to add a whole lot of compression damping to the front and rear to minimize the fork dive when hard on the brakes, and also the rear squat when hard on the throttle.

Once the compression was enough to keep this at an acceptable level, it was too much to get really good compliance through the rougher sections, and felt a bit jittery on the smaller imperfections.

The heavier 250lb aggressive springs were just what the doctor ordered in this scenario. They stabilized the weight transfer/pitch fore/aft when riding aggressively. Effectively eliminating the need to trail the rear to stabilize the chassis, and limit the dive when hard on the brakes for a deep corner entry.

The bike feels like its got lead in the wheels, like its sucked onto the road. Whoops and brutal expansion joints have no effect the bike stays planted and follows the contours of the road, yet the ride is incredibly smooth and supple, never jittery. You can feel everything going on at the contact patches, and the ride is still plush! Big difference from the stock springs with us bigger fellas aboard! [laugh]

Her sag is running 30mm front and rear now, and I also was able to back off the compression damping to improve the compliance without sacrificing any stability, and I'm much happier with the performance of the suspension now. [clap]

Overall a cheap fix for the benefits gained. ;)

Statler said:
I look forward to riding with him again.
Chris, we are sooo gonna rip those mountains out there! >:D Can't wait! ;D

Give my love to Gwendy and your precious little Aeryn. :angel:

We'll have the sisters back together again before you know it. (Hopefully Hawaiibiker (now in DC), will be able to join us with the third Pearl White / Red Rs!) [thumbsup]

[/Minor Thread Jack [cheeky]]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's another couple of my favorite Ducati press release photos of a hard cornering Rs for ya Tom. [thumbsup]

Have a Blast on yer new Girl.;D CIAO4NOW~SC
 

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Great thread guys. Sounds like I really haven't tapped the potential of my suspension. I'm 200 lbs + gear. I'm exciting to find out how different it'll feel once I get her set up for my weight. Thanks [thumbsup]
 

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+ 1 on the thread. i just got my S4 but after reading this, i know i will have to get an S4Rs before long. i'm thinking i'll hand the S4 down to my son after a couple of years. i didn't think i could handle a bigger Monster, so i initially looked at the 695. after a test ride i realized i wanted the S2R800. then i found a great buy in the S4 i just got. but after experiencing that ride and getting addicted to the sheer power of the S4 and reading this thread, i know i NEED an S4Rs.

thanks for fueling the passion. ;D
 

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Great info on here. I bought an S2R 800 after years on Jap sportbikes, so I'm going through the same adjustment as you. What I've noticed is that the proper technique of getting your weight forward and to the inside is even more important on this bike than on my prior bikes. It was proper technique on those bikes, but you could get away with having your weight more centered on them. On my Monster, it really responds to a good, aggressive position and turns really well. I think the very initial turn in is a hair slower than my old bikes, but it's really irrelevant because once turned the bike is very stable through the turn and holds a line even better than I expected. I have no doubt that this bike will easily lean to knee dragging angles, though I'm waiting until my fork work is done and Power CTs are mounted to find out for myself.
 

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this pic looks even better at this angle. imho. ;D

great thread.
 

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keoni1978 said:
I think the best way to learn your bike is to ride it and try different positions while you're on it. Once you put more miles on it, you're going to love it.
Good point keoni! [thumbsup]

I'll elaborate a bit more by saying: Allot of it is trial and error, no two riders ride exactly alike.

Just approach it slowly and carefully so it doesn't bite you. Smooth gets you acquainted with the bike, the suspension action, your tires, and their individual responses. Ham-fisted imputs at best scare the **** out of you. At worse put you down or spit you off entirely. [laugh]

One nice thing I like about the Monsters, and the Yamahas too for that matter, is that as long as you don't have a damper on them hiding/masking the bikes responses to your input (IE; Weight distribution, steering input, throttle/braking inputs.), and so long as you are smooth and gradual in your approach, the bike WILL tell you what it likes, and what it doesn't like.

With a bike as powerful as the S4Rs' everything is magnified greatly, is MUCH more sensitive, and happens MUCH more rapid rate. Especially when running at a base RPM of 7.5K or higher![cheeky] Some see it as twitchy, nervous and generally undesirable. I see it as an abundance of communication from the bike itself. All one has to do is listen, and understand what she's telling you. :)

Allot of riders find the Yammys very nervous also, and never truly get comfortable on them. Just another good example of what rider input/technique will do to a bike, and your perception of it. I personally think riding bikes like these actually make you a better rider in that you have to really ride them to get satisfactory results.

Here's a couple of very basic examples:

Get a little greedy with the throttle, and let the bike get ahead of you without leading it with your body and they respond with a little nervous head wiggle as the front tire skipps along the pavement, but not quite enough weight transfer to wheel carry. Forcing you to back off the throttle input. (Transfer a bit more weight forward and loosen your death grip on the bars with the same non-reduced throttle input the bike calms down, the front stays planted, and it rails. Getting much more of the power and torque to the pavement efficiently right up to the limits of the rear tires slip angle. [thumbsup] )

Get on the brakes smooth and hard with the front suspension setup too soft, and the rake and trail gets extreme quickly as the forks compress too rapidly. Result more head shake. (Dial in more compression damping to the forks, or if already feeling a bit jittery, add more preload and back off the damping to give it support as well as better compliance over less than flat pavement. Result is a happy bike no more head shake, and you can brake more aggressively right up to the limits of the front tire's traction on the given surface.)

(Turn in is also more rapid since you don't have to wait on the fully compressed forks to rebound, to settle the chasis. Essentially balancing the weight between the front and rear contact patches before cranking her over into the turn, and in turn preventing tucking the front by having to much weight/load on the front contact patch. :) )

Rotten Randy said:
I just ordered front and rear springs for my Ohlins. Can't to get my bike really dialed in [thumbsup]
Cool! [clap] You WILL notice quite a difference in the support, and compliance Randy. ;) Initially get your sag between 25-30mm for a base then start with the rebound, then compression settings. If it starts to feel a little harsh when dampened enough to reduce pitch and weight transfer, then add a bit more preload, and back off the compression damping a couple of clicks. [thumbsup]

The S4Rs' stock Ohlins are amazing in what they can absorb (when setup and dialed in) without upsetting you or the bike while still feeling everything that the contact patches are doing.

Plushness, and support, without loss of feel..........pretty amazing. :eek: To me anyway. ;D

Cheers~SC
 

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GREAT posts guys! I really need to check this section out more often. It took me 3 years of riding to learn about my bike what was just summed up in this post. +1 on a properly sprung bike. I'm 6'4" 220# and currently running full Ohlins on the S4R. Although realizing the quality is there over the Showa, I'm sure a majority of the ride improvement is from proper spring matching so compression and preload can be reduced. Plush, plush, plush!
 

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found this on a search. wow [thumbsup] very helpful.

i'm 176 or so, probably 180+ with all my commute stuff so getting suspension set is hopefully going to make a big difference. i have found myself getting more used to this beast as the break in period evolves.

your advise is greatly appreciated. sort of have buyers remorse (comparing this bike to my 636 and the new CBR600) but at the same time intense curiosity (and desire to ride all the time).


SHADOWCHASER said:
Ciao Tom.

You have purchased IMHO what is one of the greatest all around bikes there is. [thumbsup]

First thing to ask you is if your Sag, Compression and Rebound settings are set properly for your weight.?.

Stock the S4Rs is sprung for a 160lb rider. After being unable to get enough preload dialed in to have my bike operating in its sweet spot (The upper 1/3 of its total range) and having actually bottomed my suspension a few times when really pushing it hard on a very rough road. I changed my fork and rear springs to a 250lb aggressive rate springs, and now she is perfect for my 6'3" 215lb frame.

As far as feeling very light / hyper sensitive in steering, and riding high in the front, this is normal for most monsters when stock.

The wider flat bars and the more upright riding position take some getting used to when coming off of a repli-racer with clip-ons.

Lighten your grip on the bars, and use allot of body English. IE: keep your upper torso way forward and to the inside of the corner directly over the grip nearest the inside of the corner. Counter-steering and bar inputs on these bikes are very light / touchy compared to a clip on equipped repli-racer.

The bike responds as much if not more to body position and weight transfer, and throttle inputs, as it does steering inputs. Proper weight distribution really settles these bikes immensely.

Depending on how tall or rather inseam challenged you are, the easiest fix to get more weight over the front is to have the adjustable rear ride height link raised 1". This will give the front a more planted feel especially under throttle. It will also make the turn in much easier and sharper. You only have to think about turning and they turn. They almost FALL into corners. (Note: If your rear compression is set too soft the bike will transfer too much weight to the rear (squatting under throttle) and causes it to run wide also.) (Too much compression damping on the forks gives the bike a nose high attitude and will also cause it to drift wide in the corners.)

Even with the bike set up and dialed in, the wide handle bars offer tremendous leverage (this is the majority of the lightness you are feeling.) You have to retrain yourself to have a very light touch on the bars. Small bar inputs have immediate and substantial results. Also holding on too tightly instead of using your abdominal muscles and legs to grip the bike can cause a slight weave that is rider input induced. If you still cannot get use to the added leverage you can add a steering damper, or clip-ons to negate the effect.

When adjusting your damping make all of your adjustments in small increments and take notes as to how it feels to you as well as how the bike is responding to the adjustment. There is no common setting that works for everyone, and has allot to do with your body type and your style of riding.

You can easily drag a knee on an Rs once the bike is dialed in. It takes much less effort to do on the monster than on a repli-racer, but it is a different feel to the hanging off position also. You'll feel your hands will be much higher in relation to your upper torso than on a clip-on equipped bike.

Take the time to get her dialed in and you will love her. You'll get used to the lightened steering after riding her a bit so don't rush to slap a damper on her till you get everything set up for you and your riding style.

Putting a damper on too early can mask problems with your settings, and in turn hamper the dial in process.

Swapping to clip-ons while improving the bikes for lack of a better term "track manners", will have a negative effect on it's comfort in long distance stints.

Once set up the S4Rs' Trellis frame is good enough to ride the bike completely off of its wheels. It's only limiting factor is the riders skill, and I for one am having an absolute blast TRYING to tap into even half of the actual outright potential of the S4Rs package. [laugh]

<Edit> I just noticed you also own a turbo Busa. That explains ALLOT!!! [laugh] [laugh] [laugh]

I used to own a 99' Busa, and the Rs handles and responds much differently. More sensitive to set up, yet much lighter and more nimble. Much more sensitive to throttle inputs.

Where you have to really crank on the Busa to compensate for the higher weight and less bar leverage, and a mile long rock stable wheel base to hustle it through the twisties. The Rs has the same hypersensitive feel of an R6, but with even more bar leverage, less front end weight bias, and only a slightly longer more stable wheelbase in relation to an R6.

I can see how this is a big change for you coming off of a long low heavy Busa. Once you get used to it you'll love it!

I actually find it infinately more entertaining than my old Busa. It doesn't have the outright terminal velocity of the Busa, but with the full Termi kit its not off by much, and accelerates almost as hard as a stock Busa. It's a real challenge to keep the front on the ground and take full advantage of its power to weight!

While the stock Busa wheelies easily the Termi equipped Rs wheelies even easier! >:D >:D >:D

Very different creatures, from completely opposite ends of the sport bike spectrum.

I'll bet you've added an extended swing arm to harness the power of your turbo Busa. This would only magnify the differences you are noticing between the two bikes. ;)

Hope this helps. ~SC
 

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[thumbsup]
Great! I'm in the process of buying a 2005 S4R and have been trying to undestand if there is something wrong with this individual bike as it behaved "hypersensitively" and ran wide on corners if I didn't attack them actively. I also thought that its springs were made out of a wooden block... After reading this thread I do believe that it just needs some suspension set-up and that the bike actually _requires_ an active riding style!

Thanks for writing these wide words here!

Cheers, pexi
 

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Rotten Randy said:
Great thread guys. Sounds like I really haven't tapped the potential of my suspension. I'm 200 lbs + gear. I'm exciting to find out how different it'll feel once I get her set up for my weight. Thanks [thumbsup]
Where did you get your springs for your bike. I'm in need of replacing mine.
 

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SHADOWCHASER said:
Ciao Tom.

You have purchased IMHO what is one of the greatest all around bikes there is. [thumbsup]

First thing to ask you is if your Sag, Compression and Rebound settings are set properly for your weight.?.

Stock the S4Rs is sprung for a 160lb rider. After being unable to get enough preload dialed in to have my bike operating in its sweet spot (The upper 1/3 of its total range) and having actually bottomed my suspension a few times when really pushing it hard on a very rough road. I changed my fork and rear springs to a 250lb aggressive rate springs, and now she is perfect for my 6'3" 215lb frame.

As far as feeling very light / hyper sensitive in steering, and riding high in the front, this is normal for most monsters when stock.

The wider flat bars and the more upright riding position take some getting used to when coming off of a repli-racer with clip-ons.

Lighten your grip on the bars, and use allot of body English. IE: keep your upper torso way forward and to the inside of the corner directly over the grip nearest the inside of the corner. Counter-steering and bar inputs on these bikes are very light / touchy compared to a clip on equipped repli-racer.

The bike responds as much if not more to body position and weight transfer, and throttle inputs, as it does steering inputs. Proper weight distribution really settles these bikes immensely.

Depending on how tall or rather inseam challenged you are, the easiest fix to get more weight over the front is to have the adjustable rear ride height link raised 1". This will give the front a more planted feel especially under throttle. It will also make the turn in much easier and sharper. You only have to think about turning and they turn. They almost FALL into corners. (Note: If your rear compression is set too soft the bike will transfer too much weight to the rear (squatting under throttle) and causes it to run wide also.) (Too much compression damping on the forks gives the bike a nose high attitude and will also cause it to drift wide in the corners.)

Even with the bike set up and dialed in, the wide handle bars offer tremendous leverage (this is the majority of the lightness you are feeling.) You have to retrain yourself to have a very light touch on the bars. Small bar inputs have immediate and substantial results. Also holding on too tightly instead of using your abdominal muscles and legs to grip the bike can cause a slight weave that is rider input induced. If you still cannot get use to the added leverage you can add a steering damper, or clip-ons to negate the effect.

When adjusting your damping make all of your adjustments in small increments and take notes as to how it feels to you as well as how the bike is responding to the adjustment. There is no common setting that works for everyone, and has allot to do with your body type and your style of riding.

You can easily drag a knee on an Rs once the bike is dialed in. It takes much less effort to do on the monster than on a repli-racer, but it is a different feel to the hanging off position also. You'll feel your hands will be much higher in relation to your upper torso than on a clip-on equipped bike.

Take the time to get her dialed in and you will love her. You'll get used to the lightened steering after riding her a bit so don't rush to slap a damper on her till you get everything set up for you and your riding style.

Putting a damper on too early can mask problems with your settings, and in turn hamper the dial in process.

Swapping to clip-ons while improving the bikes for lack of a better term "track manners", will have a negative effect on it's comfort in long distance stints.

Once set up the S4Rs' Trellis frame is good enough to ride the bike completely off of its wheels. It's only limiting factor is the riders skill, and I for one am having an absolute blast TRYING to tap into even half of the actual outright potential of the S4Rs package. [laugh]

<Edit> I just noticed you also own a turbo Busa. That explains ALLOT!!! [laugh] [laugh] [laugh]

I used to own a 99' Busa, and the Rs handles and responds much differently. More sensitive to set up, yet much lighter and more nimble. Much more sensitive to throttle inputs.

Where you have to really crank on the Busa to compensate for the higher weight and less bar leverage, and a mile long rock stable wheel base to hustle it through the twisties. The Rs has the same hypersensitive feel of an R6, but with even more bar leverage, less front end weight bias, and only a slightly longer more stable wheelbase in relation to an R6.

I can see how this is a big change for you coming off of a long low heavy Busa. Once you get used to it you'll love it!

I actually find it infinately more entertaining than my old Busa. It doesn't have the outright terminal velocity of the Busa, but with the full Termi kit its not off by much, and accelerates almost as hard as a stock Busa. It's a real challenge to keep the front on the ground and take full advantage of its power to weight!

While the stock Busa wheelies easily the Termi equipped Rs wheelies even easier! >:D >:D >:D

Very different creatures, from completely opposite ends of the sport bike spectrum.

I'll bet you've added an extended swing arm to harness the power of your turbo Busa. This would only magnify the differences you are noticing between the two bikes. ;)

Hope this helps. ~SC
Did you just replace the spring on the shock or did your re valve...anything else. What did you do to the front also?
 

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Great reading.

I'm curious what suspension changes you suggest for a 155lb rider on a stock S2R800 with clip-ons. I'm recently returned to motos after a 20 year layoff, so all of the above goes way over my head. In other words, I am surely not leaning anywhere near the bike's potential (I can see that the rear tire hasn't even leaned over to the edge of the tread!), and I generally find that I run turns wider than I expect to. It "feels" like it sits high up front, but that's hardly a scientific judgment!
 

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Aztec said:
Great reading.

I'm curious what suspension changes you suggest for a 155lb rider on a stock S2R800 with clip-ons. I'm recently returned to motos after a 20 year layoff, so all of the above goes way over my head. In other words, I am surely not leaning anywhere near the bike's potential (I can see that the rear tire hasn't even leaned over to the edge of the tread!), and I generally find that I run turns wider than I expect to. It "feels" like it sits high up front, but that's hardly a scientific judgment!
I know what you mean. My Duc felt like an SUV when I first started riding it. Maybe because I had always been on sport bikes (with the lean tight over the front feeling)?

IMO, it's so inexpensive to take it to a suspension expert and have them dial it in for ya' (around here about $40); that's how I always go about it and appreciate the perfection that I get out of them.

As for turning wide (of course it's impossible to give great advice without seeing what you are doing, but) one thing to look for is the entry point. If you come into a corner from the outside and then lean over (either pushing down on the inside bar or pulling in from the opposite) with your exit point chosen (look exactly where you want to go) you'll be precise and essentially all the work is done and you just relax as the bike does the rest.

Go in slow enough that you can maintain a throttle as you zoom through: feels so much fun that way >:D and gives the best traction since you are not overloading the front tire.

I love using my legs as well. Push down outside peg and I like to use my whole leg, especially where my knee is into the tank -- while keeping the grips like I am holding eggs (death grip is a newbie thing and leads to inadvertent rider input).
 
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