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Discussion Starter #1
I've never ridin a motorcycle before, I was wondering if you guys think I should take this beginners course for $79 or just take the MSF course for $198. Here's a short description of the beginner course:

This Learn-To-Ride session introduces students to motorcycling, and establishes the foundation skills, on which all other skills are built. You will study motorcycle controls; where they are and how to properly
use them, specifically when learning to ride. You will be introduced to proper riding posture, shifting and "finding" neutral. Mastery of the throttle roll-on, coordinated with clutch release, for getting underway
smoothly, are primary objectives.

Or should I just take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Course which consist of 2 class sessions and 2 riding sessions for $198? I'm kinda strapped for cash and I was wondering if they teach you basics in the MSF course. I don't want to take the beginner course, then find out they go over the same material in the MSF course.. thanks..
 

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It sounds like the MSF course is an extended version of the introductory course. You may want to talk to the instructors to confirm this, but I would go ahead and take the MSF course. You cannot have too much information! The MSF course will get into counter steering, emergency braking, etc. The MSF course is the most important safety feature next to your helmet.
 

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If you can possibly afford it, go for the MSF course. Not only is it more comprehensive, it will get you a discount on your insurance. Also, it may eliminate the need for you to take a drivers test at the DMV. ;D
 

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Take the MSF...I can still here my instructor in my head telling me to do things, I also think that they instill a sense of confidence of control that you may not be able to get in a beginner course--many people take the MSF and still shouldn't be riding a motorcycle until they practice a LOT more.... You may be able to get a break on your insurance if you take the course. No offense, but if you can't afford to take the course, how are you going to afford everything else that goes along with motorcycling...because if the MSF keeps you from dropping your bike or lowsliding, its paid for itself.

my two cents,

gnew
 

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Take the MSF course.
 
J

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm definetly going to take the MSF class, but I was wondering if I should take the beginner class for $79. I didn't want to waste $79 on that class if they're just gonna teach me the same thing in the MSF class. Know what I'm saying..
 

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Don't bother with the $79 course. The basic MSF course starts from the beginning. They don't expect you to know anything. Hell the first on bike exercise is to have someone PUSH you across the practice range so you can try balancing with feet up without worrying about the clutch and throttle!

The MSF course will work on panic stops, buth straight line and while mid-turn. It works on swerving around obstacles, turning from a stop like at an intersection, slaloms, turns. Sounds like the $79 course doesn't get into ANY of that stuff and it's stuff you NEED to know!

Go straignt to the MSF course and sign up as soon as you can. There are terrible wait lists in most communities.
 

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MSF Course - highly recommended!
 

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Don't bother with that beginners course...

MSF will teach you that stuff as well. I just completed it a couple of weeks ago, I've had my license for 25 years and I found it really useful!
They will not only teach you the basics, but the stuff you need to help keep you alive and safe.
Possible insurance discounts and waiver of the DMV tests are just icing on the cake.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
MSF. It's designed for beginners. Whatever this beginner class is, it would most likely be a repeat of the MSF materials.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
I signed up for the riders edge beginner course and the MSF. The beginner course from Harley the Riders Edge Program is very similar to MSF except it's one day longer. 3 days class room two days 'on the range' The MSF course I am going to take about 3 months later, and will hopefully already have a motorcycle and can take the MSF to remove any bad habits that I have gotten during the MSF course. When it comes to Motorcycling, there is an element of danger, any possability I have to remove that element of danger is worth it, regardless of cost, because it will always be cheaper then lost work and hospital bills
 

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Another reason to take the MSF--your state may waive the riding portion of your driver's test.

gnew
 

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defintely take the MSF course. its worth it, especially since you get your m1 endorsment at the end.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Take the MSF. As someone already mentioned, some states, like UT, will waive the skills portion of the license test. So, all you have to take is a short written exam to get your "M" endorsement.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Re: Why take the MSF course after the >

Riders Edge? My understanding was the Riders Edge was an enhanced version of the MSF course.

From the Rider's Edge wbsite...
"You will receive your Motorcycle Safety Foundation RiderCourseSM completion card after passing a multiple-choice written knowledge test and a riding skills evaluation.

Depending on which state you live in, this card may exempt you from having to take the written and/or riding portion of your motorcycle license test (be sure to contact your participating dealership in your state for exemption information).

Depending on your insurance provider, the completion card can also qualify you for a substantial discount - usually 10 to 15% - on motorcycle coverage. Check with your insurance company for details. "

Spend that extra money on better gear or wait to take the MSF Experienced Riders course. You're just throwing your $150 away otherwise.
the problem with the MSF course is that it isn't until the end of july, I could get into the Riders Edge course in early may. Also the MSF course is free if you actually show up, it costs you $20 if you don't
 

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In Ohio, you can take the course for $25. They supply you with a bike and helmet and they waive the license test when you pass. Sweet deal!
 
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Re: Huh? what? I'm confused. >

Free if you take it and they charge you if you don't?
In any event, if you take the Riders Edge course in May, the MSF course becomes redundant. You will essentially have taken it and gotten the MSF certificate from the Riders Edge. I'm assuming of course you pass the Riders Edge. ;)
yes in Illinois, it costs $20 to register, and when you complete the course you get the $20 back or you can donate it to the MSF and get a free t-shirt, either way I think its worth it. But if you don't show, it costs you $20 to register. The reason I took the Riders edge course is that I really want to purchase a motorcycle, and I don't want to wait until July to 'mount up'
 
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Discussion Starter #20
From the perspective on an Instructor:

The basic $75 dollar thing sounds like a remedial intro-course that some programs offer. If you have no motorcycle understand and/or are terrified of riding, this may be a good place to start. Otherwise, the informaiton will be covered in the Basic MSF course (BRC - Basic Rider Course) But at a quicker pace than the $75 gig.

I honestly and not a big fan of the HD Buell version for newer riders simply because the Buell Blasts they use have too much power for the majority of new riders. Its fine for someone who has a fair amount of riding under their belt but may not be ready for the Experienced Rider Course (ERC).

However, with the MSF program in your state. Shop around. MSF is a national program that sanctions smaller state-run programs to teach their cirriculum. This means that there may be several MSF programs in your state. (Or there may be only one). Not all MSF programs are created equal, some are terrible and some are incredible. Be willing to make a few phone calls and ask around. Where I teach we have two programs. One is sponsored by the community college and is staffed mostly by cops looking for promotion points. IMHO its an awful program where the majority of instructors rarely ride motorcycles and we have heard of some instructors not having any concept of counter-steering (I'm not making this up). But the other program, the one I work for, the owner hand picks all of his instructors looking for attitude, riding style, etc. For example, he won't hire anybody that can only speak Harley or only speak Sport-bike. He only hires true motorcyclists (those who love all motorcycles) and as a result he has one of the top ranked programs in the country. Pretty cool.

Check out http://www.msf-usa.org/index_new.cf...0CC-53D5-641BAAF07CDB3F7C&pagename=Talk To Us
and call your state coordinator to get the numbers of all the programs in your state.

And when taking the course, remember to look really really far ahead, keeping your head and eyes up, looking the direction you want to go!

Cheers,
Dave
 
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