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I decided to really launch at a red light on my dark750.

so the light turned green and i took off. i ended up having to brake when a car just changed lanes without signaling infront of me.

i always use the front and back brake, but this time, the back tire started sliding to the right, but the interesting thing was that it didnt feel like the brake locked and there was no screeching noise.

it kinda scared the hell outta me, but everything was fine.

i got onto a backroad and tested the brakes again.

this time i zipped a straight line and pulled in both brakes pretty hard.

again, the back started sliding to the right without making a screeching sound and without feeling like it was locking (but maybe it did lock and i just didnt know?)

any ideas?

i'm concerned something is wrong with my rear brake, but maybe ive just never hit the brakes that hard before even though i thought i had?

any thoughts out there?

thanks!

-derin
 

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I hardly ever use the rear brake for anything except to keep me from sliding backwards on a hill. I don't see anything wrong with an initial application of the rear brake to settle the suspension, but I'd come off of it or lighten up as soon as I started front braking to prevent the rear from locking-up. I'd recommend finding an empty road and trying some emergency stops from various speeds for practice. I still do this about once a week just to stay sharp in case I actually need to stop super quickly.
 

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Can't comment on what may or may not be wrong with the brake... but I personally always use both brakes, but go somewhat easy on the rear. Very generally speaking, a highside is far scarier than a lowside. Also, in everything besides 100% emergency braking, I'd say that 60%+ of my braking is coming from the engine.
 

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I hardly ever use the rear brake for anything except to keep me from sliding backwards on a hill. I don't see anything wrong with an initial application of the rear brake to settle the suspension, but I'd come off of it or lighten up as soon as I started front braking to prevent the rear from locking-up. I'd recommend finding an empty road and trying some emergency stops from various speeds for practice. I still do this about once a week just to stay sharp in case I actually need to stop super quickly.
I agree hayes, also you will find more oil on the road at intersections.
 

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I doubt there's anything wrong with your rear brake, when the rear locks up it doesn't often make any noise and it also doesn't feel any different either until it drifts to the side. In which case, leave it locked. Like rmm said, a low side is better than a highside. And like Hayes said, practice on an empty road as much as you want. Nothing wrong with knowing how hard you can stop when you need to. Just go a little lighter on the rear brake. They lock up pretty easy once that weight transfer happens and it all goes to the front.
 

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And like Hayes said, practice on an empty road as much as you want. Nothing wrong with knowing how hard you can stop when you need to. Just go a little lighter on the rear brake. They lock up pretty easy once that weight transfer happens and it all goes to the front.
also... I remember reading something interesting about riding in the rain... the recommendation was to try locking the rear (on an empty road) as a way to compare available traction to dry conditions. Of course this requires a knowledge of the baseline from locking it up on dry roads. To be increase the accuracy of this experiment you might repeat it with smokey burnouts. See how long it takes to go through a whole rear tire in fair vs inclement weather. Then post videos for peer review.
 

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My experience suggests that you only get a really good squeal from a tire sliding sideways when it is still pulling. Once you've transferred from putting power down to trying to stop, it takes a lot more to make the tire scream. Not that it can't be done, but I would suspect the rear end wasn't as loose as it felt.

The question I would have is what is really going on? In a straight line, you'd have to stand on the rear brake to make the bike bust loose, and it doesn't sound like you did that. Check the rear axle bolts to make sure they're tight and that you're not actually experiencing the axle shifting in the frame under hard braking.
 

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Squeeze, Don't Stab

I surmise you've grabbed too much front brake, too fast. This compresses the front fork, effectively unweighting the rear wheel and allowing it to skid. Try practicing panic stops with a more progressive, ever increasing squeeze of the powerful front brake. Try to keep your weight back to load the rear tire. Keep in mind your weight shifts, steering inputs and road curvature, etc., can cause the rear end of the bike to slide to one side or the other. Try panic braking with only the rear brake. Can you keep it under control? Can you steer a rear-wheel skid with your thighs? (best tested on dirt, slight downhill to spare your rubber) Is your rear brake set too tight? Pedal too high? Some say you should set it so you CAN'T lock the wheel. Practice on a dirt bike. Practice with a mountain bike... see how you can counter-steer against this and control the back end. Practice. It's essential.
 

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In a straight line, you'd have to stand on the rear brake to make the bike bust loose, and it doesn't sound like you did that. .
My M1100 has a very touchy rear brake, and I can cause it to squirm with very little pressure on the pedal. It feels like I'm giving it 20% brake, but the rear is either locking or doing it own thing. I suspect it's locking, since I can't picture anything else that would cause a rolling tire to change direction on it's own.

This didn't start right away with the bike/tire. I've got about 3500km on it, and this just started recently. Either the tire went to shiat in that distance, or the brake got more effective/less progressive as it broke in.

I've always used a little rear brake when getting on the binders, then eased off. I think I read that somewhere - it settling the bike or something, and it always felt right on my old Ninja. It also felt right on the M1100 until now, but I'll have to adjust until I figure out what's what.
 

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I don't think you locked up the rear.

You braked hard enough with the front break in a short enough distance to basically and slightly get the rear in the air. It might have been coming around to the right because of your riding position and where your body is on the bike.

From my experience racing, going from a high speed straightaway into a 1st gear turn...you jam on the brakes at the last minute (brake markers). If you're sitting up close to the tank, the rear wheel will come up off the ground a little or a lot depending on how hard your clamping down on the front brake. Just before I enter the turn, I let off the brake, the back drops back down, and the bike is then leaned into the turn. If you watch moto gp as well, there are many riders who get the back end loose under hard braking coming into a slow turn. They are partially using the rear brake to settle the bike, but the heavy front braking is enough that the rear becomes light enough that then can actually use their body to "turn" the rear...ie. slide the rear.

For the street, it's probably not ideal, but it sounds like you did a good job to control it...without planning to.
 
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