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In an emergency stop, which brake(s) do you use?

  • Front Only

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  • Both front and rear

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
During MSF class, I was taught to use both in case of emergency. However, I find myself predominantly relying on the front brake (because it works), and during an actual emergency situation (in a left hand turn lowside incident) I only used the front brake. What are your habits?

I have been considering getting a stronger/better brakes for my '06 S2R. Can you share your experience with the radial Brembos?
 

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I use the front. I am not skilled enough with the rear to keep from locking it in those situations. YMMV.
 

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Both...gently squeeze the front to get the weight onto the front, then squeeze real hard while applying some pressure to the rear (not hard).

Need to keep eyes directly ahead so bike tracks straight...

When I practice these it'll 'stoppie', so when/if the rear locks up is not an issue...
 

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Your brakes are more than good enough for any road use. I use both brakes - first front getting the load onto the front wheel and then it's hell for nuthin on both anchors. Make sure your tires are warm and the road surface is dry before attemting an all out emergency stop.

Regards,
NuTTs
 

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Stik said:
and during an actual emergency situation (in a left hand turn lowside incident) I only used the front brake. What are your habits?

I have been considering getting a stronger/better brakes for my '06 S2R. Can you share your experience with the radial Brembos?
Knowing about the incident in reference, I don't think that "better" brakes are your solution, they would not have helped in your lowside get off. :-\ I think everyone will agree with me that grabbing a handful of front brake (whether stock or radials) in the middle of a turn was what caused the lowside, leaning more instead would have helped. You should get your braking done before you enter the turn.

Sometimes if I'm entering a corner too hot I will scrub extra speed off with my rear brake as not to upset the suspension, but I don't recommend that as this topic is taboo for many. [laugh]

If you're thinking about a brake upgrade for other reasons though, ie. 2-up riding, I have no comments for that, as I always ride solo. :)

hope that helps,
michelle
 

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ducpainter said:
I use the front. I am not skilled enough with the rear to keep from locking it in those situations. YMMV.
Im no expert and have been burned every time ive tried using the rear brake but i think its important to note that its more about overcoming your reflex actions not developing skill.
Im aware that i should only tap it for no more than .5 seconds or only before the forks compress but that natural instinct to press hardeer or stay on the rear longer in an emergency is what causes the lock-up.
 

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BIG +1 on Michelle's comments.

I had a friend do that too - thought he wasn't going to make the turn and grabbed a little front brake. *POW* Low sided right in front of me.

Trail braking with the rear brake is supposed to be a great way to scrub speed off while leaned over - I tried it once or twice and it felt good, but I can't say I'm confident or proficient enough to use that technique regularly.
 
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Only the front to stop. If you are braking very, very heavily almost all the weight will be off the rear tire so therefore there isn't much traction and the tire will lock up quite easily.

The only time I really use the rear brake is to keep my bike from rolling at stop lights.

If I am doing some spirited riding in the twisties (cali rules) and I want to scrub a little speed off while leaned over I try to gently use the rear brake.

grabbing a fistful of front brake is not a good idea while leaned over. Your tire has 100% traction total available. lets say you are turning and using 70% for that traction for the turn, that means you only have up to 30% left for braking. If you grab a fistful of front brake at that point you will exceed the total traction available for that tire and the front will slip out.

In a turn it is a good idea to use a good amount of rear brake to slow down, in a straight line I am using all front.
 

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Both and shift body weight towards the rear. Keeps the family jewels out of harms way, gets the CG back towards the middle to help avoid a stoppie and keeps more weight on the rear tire so it'll be less inclined to break traction. Remember, traction = fritional force and frictional force = normal load (weight on wheel) x coefficient of friction (aka tire stickiness).
 

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I'm with the front brakers here. Front brake only in emergency stop. I lock up the rear almost every time I try to use it in panic stops. Besides, when I'm hard on the front, often the rear gets light enough to become close to worthless to me.

One thing I've learned from track riding (off-track riding, to be specific) is to stay off the front brake and use the rear ONLY when you find yourself in dirt or grass. Had to learn that one the hard one. Twice. :-\


P.S. You can't really trail brake with the rear.
 

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I use both. ;) The rear is a valuable tool inaddition to outright brakeing.

It helps to steady, and ballance the chassis, and slow weight transfer to the front enabling you to make smoother and faster transitions.

Its awesome for scrubbing small amounts of excessive speed in corners.

It is also IMHO the safest way to ride on the street where traction conditions are not always apparent, and always changing. ;)

Getting into a front only habbit is just asking for murphy to slap your hand occassionally.

Learn to use it correctly and safely and you'll love it! [thumbsup]
 

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Both is good. Originally as a dirt-rider I get rear brake happy, but have taught myself to use the front more. In an emergency, you won't think. Your body will react instinctively so thinking about it does no good, really have to train your body to do it a certain way.
 

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Too many variables for me to say....

But, as an aside...ALL Modern Ducati's (m.y. 2000 + up) have a stainless steel rear brake line. Stainless rules for a clutch...and for the front brake as well... BUT (IMHO) not so good for a rear brake line. Why? A rubber line will allow some 'give' before applying enough pressure to lock a rear wheel up. Stainless doesn't flex or allow any 'give' and therefore will apply enough pressure to lock the rear wheel up quite quickly.

I don't use my rear brake enough to actually have a rear rubber line on there mind you, just thought I'd add this to the conversation.

Predominately...I'm a front-braker.

I do, occasionally, use the rear to steady the back end of the bike if it gets squirrelly exiting a corner or going over a bump but during those times...I don't let off the throttle.

Oh, and it's great for holding the bike still at a stop-light! [thumbsup]
 
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