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Discussion Starter #1
hi all, i just got a year 2000 M750 dark. it's my first bike, so i'm not too knowledgeable on stuff like this, so i thought someone here might know (as i didn't find any info on this in the faq).

as i ease the clutch out in first gear, i find that unless i give a little throttle, the bike will ping a bit when moving out. i'm definitely not letting the clutch out too fast, and it even happens in first when the clutch is fully released and there's no throttle. is this to be expected?

thanks!
 

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Sounds like you are running lean.

Running higher octane gas might stop it, but the fix is probably to adjust the pilot screw, and/or raise the needle or go to a larger needle jet.

--Fillmore
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I have had the same problem ever since my bike was new.
If it's the same low rpm pinging that I am thinking about, I think it can be linked to the high stock gearing. The more you ride it, the more you learn to give it a little more gas off the line and smooth it out.
Also, I found that lowering your gear ratio by replacing your sprockets (either front or back) will get rid of the problem.
 

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hi all, i just got a year 2000 M750 dark. it's my first
[...]
as i ease the clutch out in first gear, i find that unless i give a little throttle, the bike will ping a bit when moving out. i'm definitely not letting the clutch out too fast, and it even happens in first when the clutch is fully released and there's no throttle. is this to be expected?
I suspect that what you're experiencing isn't pinging as such, but the knocking sound that comes from driveline lash. Pinging (preignition and/or detonation) would be expected to get worse as you gave it more gas, whereas this goes away if you feed in some power and get the revs up a little, right? My M750ie does the same thing; I think it's caused by a combination of tall gearing in first and lightweight rotating parts in the engine - thus at low RPMs, the crank and flywheel don't have enough angular momentum to keep tension on the transmission and chain, so it shudders a little with some knocking noises thrown in. Like Zeus says, you can launch with more power on and reduce or eliminate the effect, although personally I prefer to tolerate a little shudder rather than load up the clutch quite so hard. I've also found that this behavior is much more pronounced if the chain is a little loose, so you might want to take a look at that. Better a little loose than a little tight, though! :)

M.
 

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Yep, what they said. Don't be afraid to slip the clutch just a little more and let the rpms climb a little before its fully engaged.

Personally, I let the clutch out at idle until I feel the bike start to try and move. Then I slightly roll on throttle as I continue to slowly ease out on the clutch trying to keep rpms steady at something above idle until I'm fully engaged which happens at about 15+ mph.

I check my clutch about every 2K miles and I've had no measurable wear yet, and I'm right at minimum plate thickness.
 

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That is unusual. I never "ping" when I pull out. I have sighed though :p
 
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Discussion Starter #7
nice... thanks for all the help! i'm definitely getting used to it/learning how to avoid it.
 
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