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Discussion Starter #1
Today was a Christmas Eve in South Florida when you can go to the beach and get a tan and sweat, about 82 deg I'd say.

I however was tooling around on the Monster doing some last minute gift purchases. I had been riding for about 1 hr. I caught the bridge for about 5 minutes then rode for another 5 minutes and made a stop. Then about 10 minutes later headed out to follow my Dad to get gas because he was on fumes, well he ran out about a 1/4 mile from the house(haha).
I turned around went home and got the gas can that had gas in it (why he didn't already put it in his bike I don't know), I left the bike running for 5 minutes while searching the shed and garage for the can. I hopped back on and took him the gas. After he filled up and we came to a stop sign my Monster studdered and lost power, it was still running, but did not have enough power to move away, then it died and was very hot. It would not restart. I pushed it off the road took the seat off and proped up the tank to get some more airflow, 15 minutes later it cooled enough to fire, and I headed down the road without further incident.

I checked the oil, it was fine. Nothing is blocking flow to the motor. I did notice the vertical cylinder was hotter then the lower. I think it is kind of running a little funny now, but that
 

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What model and year Monster do you have?
 

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Air cooled motors need air flow to keep cool, if you are going to be stopped for more than a minute or so, shut it off. Avoid idling alomg in slow traffic, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's a 98' M900.

Yeah, I am getting the idea that I will need to shutdown when I am sitting in traffic. I am worried because the temps were nothing compared to summer. I do think I have something not right in the motor, but I have not put my finger on it yet.

I am also kinda blown away that there is nothing to channel some airflow to the vertical cylinder to aid in cooling when moving.
 

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It's a 98' M900.

Yeah, I am getting the idea that I will need to shutdown when I am sitting in traffic. I am worried because the temps were nothing compared to summer. I do think I have something not right in the motor, but I have not put my finger on it yet.

I am also kinda blown away that there is nothing to channel some airflow to the vertical cylinder to aid in cooling when moving.
Sounds like you could use an oil temp gauge. I mean since you live in South Fl. it could be useful to keep an eye on oil temp since that also helps to cool the engine.
PS! I was on vacation in Fort Lauderdale for two weeks this june and i didnt see a single Monster.......... :( :(
 

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I consider an oil temp gauge critical on these bikes. It lets you know when it's too cold to hammer, & when it's too hot & needs a rest.
 

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You took the words out of my mouth Norm! Im am going to a fit an oil temp gauge to my M900.Then i have total control of oil temp (and also engine temp in a way) Oil temp can get VERY high since its a aircooled engine,and living in South Fl. doesnt exactly help the oil being cold......im glad i live in Norway where we seldom have over 25 degrees celsius ;D
 

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Do a search on here on "fuel pump". I have a 95 M900 that vapor locked in stop and go traffic pulling into Bike Week last year. Since then I've become the evangelist of the dying fuel pump for carb'd Monsters. A lot of discussion bounced back and forth. Sounds like you may have had the same problem I did.

PM me, and I'll give you a source for rebuild kit and any tips I can think of. Or, you'll probably turn all that info up in the search on "fuel pump".
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks a bunch.

I think the oil temp gauge is a good idea, maybe with the new tach addition.

I do believe my bike is running a little lean. Which would indicate the fuel pump or carb problem.

I pulled the plugs and they appear to have a white coating. Which I think means lean? I dunno still learning these desmos.

And no there are not many Ducatis, especially Monsters, in South Florida, I know of two other guys with Monsters and one is my brother.
 

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I live in South Florida (Broward County). Trust me, our monsters can handle the heat down here. I have had my monster for about three years now and after riding in all types of weather I have only overheated once. Even then, the bike did not stop running, it just starting running very rough and backfiring. I was able to get it home and let it sit and then it was fine. Now that I think about it, it never overheated when I was using fully synthetic 20w50 moto oil. The time it overheated I was in heavy traffic for 30 + minutes and I was using plain dyno oil. I guess I'll switch back to synthetic.
 

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I don't know if this helps any but....
I live in Monterey, usually we have very mellow weather, not too cold, not too hot most of the time. When I first learned that the majority of ducati's were air cooled, I was very shocked. I am still new to the biker world and was a little put off at the idea. I then bought my monster and was always a little paranoid that it would overheat every two seconds. I've caught a few hot days (80-90 degrees) and have yet to come close. I've idled around for several minutes in hot weather and still never came close. Unless you're stuck in some serious traffic on a hot day (which is what... everyday where you're at) I wouldn't worry too much... Just keep moving... that's why the motorcycle gods made bikes like ours skinny enough to lane split! :eek:
 

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I was always concerned because I am in New Orleans where it gets really hot too. I installed an oil cooler on my 620 for that reason. On 2002 there is a temp gauge and I called ducati when I started seeing 280 on my reading. They said this was ok and when I asked about the max temp listed in the owners manual being much lower they couldnt explain why they use the lower figure. I use synthetic oil which doesnt break down until higher temps and I just RIDE.
 

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Not sure if your still checking this post for suggestions but I know the cause to your "overheating" problem. I was just searching the board for rectifier/regulator info and noticed this post. The same thing happens to my m900. It will idle, but try and open the throttle and it dies. Same symptoms as an empty tank. The problem is not overheating exactly. The problem is the routing of the fuel line. When the tank is closed the fuel line is right on top of the V head, and that is the hottest part of the motor due to its confines and lack of ventilation. What happens is the fuel in the line gets vaporized (no longer a liquid but a gas) and it wont fire in the cylinder. So you get the empty symptom. The solution: Well I dont have one. But i have a quick fix instead of waiting 15 minutes for it to cool down. I found that if you open the fuel cap then start the bike and let idle for about 30 sec while kinda swaying the bike side to side to move the gas around. After about 20-30sec you can rap the throttle and your good to go again. Just turn the bike off and close fuel cap, restart and go. The larger opening w/ the fuel cap open allows for more atmospheric pressure to push the fuel down and refill the line. Dont know if this helps but if your on the side of the highway when it happens (like i have been) its nice to know it will only take about 30 sec to be moving again.
 
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This overheating happened to me ...well, my '95 M900 (!)...(and another 2000 model M900 rider) during hot days last summer - c. 38 to 43 deg C 8).
The engine was loosing power, coughed and then shutdown, as if loosing fuel.
Letting the bike stand and cool for 15 minutes made everything OK to continue for about 20 minutes...this was both in stop-and-go traffic and on the open road.
My problem was that the fuel line was lying on the top of the crankcase before it looped into the vacuum pump. Hence it was vapourising the fuel before it got into the pump, hence no pumping action, and no fuel to the carbs.
people I asked had talked about vapour lock in the tank, but the tank should be vented (blow through your lines - both the vent and overflow- to make sure they're clear) to release this pressure, and anyhow, any increase in tank pressure should help "force" fuel down to the pump.
I relocated my lines so they didn't run on the case and since then I've had no problems.
PS I also made up some side scoops out of plastic gutter piping (I know, a bit rough) which did help in directing more air to the rear cylinder, but since doing the fuel pipe run mod, I've never felt the need to run with these again. Summer temps here run from 25deg C to 45 deg C (77deg F to 115 degF for our US amigos ;D)...
Boy, I feel for the Norwegian viking who never sees more than 25 deg C.....brrrrrrrr :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
WOW- you guys pulled this one from weeks ago.

Sometimes I am amazed at all the help provided here. Thank you!

I will check my fuel lines as well, is there anywhere to better route them. The vertical cylinder pretty much takes up all that space, I guess just get them as far away from it as possible?

Thanks again.
 
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Don't know what the model is you have, but on my "95 M900 the line comes out of the tank underneath on the RHS, U turns back into the filter which is held on under the tank by a metal strip, and then out of the filter turning rearwards under the frame crossmember where the tank is pivotted. It then turns forward down the frame to an isolation valve on the RHS outer frame face around knee height (OK, depends on how tall you are ;D) and runs down here under the pump. turning back up into the pump, before coming out and rising to the carbs. The pipe thus keeps to the inside of the frame pretty much. I have space, albeit small, above the vertical cylinder, but the pipe lay on the crankcase cover (blah, blah, blah per above post...)
Don't know if this helps, but check the routing carefully for any bunching or kinking (not that I have anything against a bit of kinky stuff, but I digress... ;D) so as to make the pipe run smooth and free of contact with hot parts...
Good luck Yellowduc..... :)
 
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What type and where would you install "said oil temperature gauge" on a 2000 900ie. I dont have one and would like one.
 

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Boy, I feel for the Norwegian viking who never sees more than 25 deg C.....brrrrrrrr :eek:
It can get up to just over 30 degrees here....but thats not often!! Usually about 20-30ish in the summer-time here. In the winter time it can range from -20 to +10 degrees. I live by the coast so its hot here compared to places further in....when i was in the army i experienced -45 degrees celsius!!!! Damn that was cold...if you were spitting it would freeze before it hit the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Has anyone ever relocated the fuel filter from the tank? I was looking at the whole setup today and it seems less than ideal.
I was thinking maybe make a bracket to mount it on the frame eliminating that "u" and the big curve the squishes between the tank and frame.
 
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I was thinking the same thing. I am having a fuel delivery problem I think. Plugs have gone from a light black to a lite brown. Also, when I give it a handful of throttle in any gear greater than first, it hesitates bad.

Tom E.
 
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