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I got this book (by Keith Code) about a week ago and have been trying to apply some of the lessons in it. I'm wondering if other folks have read it and felt it helped their riding.

Some of the points about Survival Reactions seem dead on to me, and I know the stuff that gets me rattled. The section on throttle control is interesting, but I got kind of annoyed at how he ducked the "best line through a curve" question. Basically he says the best line is the one that gets you through without making any bad throttle adjustments.

So anyway, have people had some time to apply it and does it seem to work? So far I'm just working on the throttle control part and it does seem to help, although can be a bit nerve-wracking.
 

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Ciao,
I have not read any of them books about riding. More on skiing yes...
But throttle control on a curve is a good question. Was there a lenght or radius described ?
I do a lot of different kind of italian roads and some curves I love, some I hate, there is no rules in road making about radius or degrees or how blind they might be.
Only rule more or less is to stay on Your lane.

Anyway, for me on my monster the curve I control a lot by throttle ( preparations include right amount of speed taken out by pre braking and in most cases only by motor braking.

I take out the slack of throttle and chain and then just increase the throttle by sensing radius and centifugal pressure measured by my butt and spine sensor.

I like to be up to 5-6krms out of the corner to have all the power for the short straight away....

hmmmm, I got out of order here I guess....

Anyway, Michael, do we see next month ?

Skier
 

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I have been told that "twist of the wrist" is a little out dated now. And there are other books out there geared to the more modern bikes of today?

But I assume the basic principles of cornering and technique would stay the same???
 

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I've skimmed through both volumes and had Level I of the school. Vol II is better than than the first book.

I feel his throttle control teaching is good and has helped my riding on street and track. In combination with his ideas on completing all downshifts/braking/body position just before turn in, throttle control becomes the big stability factor in completing the turn - more than the line chosen. Of course line is important, too. But throttle control makes a real difference.
 

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I have read twist 1 and II. The books are not that well written, but the content is excellent. I took Keith Codes Level I and II course last year and it is basically what is in the books.

If you read the books and try to do all the changes, you will be confused and it will not work well.

Many will not agree with what he teaches, but it works. My lap times improved significantly and with much more control. Each of the track schools teach differently and have different methods. You can learn from all of them, but you first must master what each is teaching and use it well before learning from another school. Keith Code concentrates on Cornering, thats it.

In the level I course, the first time on the track is 4th gear no brakes. The idea is that you should concentrate only on "rolling on" the throttle while in the turn. The earlier the better. Do this until you are comfortable with rolling on the throttle as soon as you have initiated the turn, well before the apex.

Once you have that mastered, then you concentrate on your turn in point while rolling on the throttle.

Each point in the book is added on allowing you to build on what you have done.

If you read the book and only add 1 task at a time it will all make more sense.

The best way is to take the course and have instructors chase you and watch what you do and follow the instructor to see how they do it.
 

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I read Twist of the Wrist II and tried to apply some of the tips to my riding, but I wasn't sure it helped much.

Then I read Proficient Motorcycling and that made a big difference. Code talks about how to balance the bike and feel what it's doing, but Hough explains how to be a better rider. I'll probably reread the Code book in a few months, since I recently finished the Hough book a second time. Maybe I'll pick up a few more useful hints.
 

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I've read both 1+2, and Proficient motorcycling. I use them all as reference materials when I've had a rusty ride.

At the reccommendation of someone on the board, I bought "Sport Riding Techniques". I found this to be the best one by far. It's better written than Code's books, and it seems that the ideas are more practical.
 
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I'm not too hot on Keith Code, but ofcourse YMMV.

For me, Nick Ienatch's Sport Riding Techniques is just way better- well written and the info is top notch. I can barely get through Keith's books, but then again it may be my problem- he obviously knows his ****.


-hahah, unintended use of the censorship. I really don't know about Keith's relationship w/his testies.
 

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You are right about Keiths poor writing style. The book is very hard to read and stay awake.

It really is meant more for those who takes the course. If you skip the steps in Twist I and go to Twist II you really miss what he is trying to teach. This is not stated anywhere in the books.
 

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Ifound the DVD much easier to follow and more helpful than the book.

jas
 

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I like his comments(negative) on" pushing the bike under you".and the use of the outside peg as a pivot point. Took some getting used to but I now feel like i'm really "snapped in", connected to the bike if you will.
 

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I havent read Code's books, but I have read "Sport Riding Techniques" by Nick Ienatch's and I can definately say that it noticeably improved my riding. What was most effective was his explanation and techniques on body weight distribution while riding through curves, as well as making sure that your wrists are not carrying any of you body' weight on them allowing you to be much more precise with throttle input.
 

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What about "More Proficient Motorcycling"?

As in Twist I vs Twist II, I agree that II is better. Was wondering if More Proficient Motorcycling would also eclipse the first edition.

I've read all the other books mentioned (and continue to reread).

Of course I'm just a new rider, with only a slim 58 miles experience in a large parking lot. (Yes, I took/passed the MSF)

I think I'm seeking comfort from the reading, like it's going to make me safer or something. My husband ('05 Gixxer1000/11K miles experience) suggests I hit our local straightaway on a quiet early eve and blow the intimidation out of my helmet at 60mph. I really like the mall parking lot. LOL

But I digress...

Proficient Moto and More Proficient Moto. Is there a difference or should I just get'em both.
 

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IMO the situation is reversed. Proficient Motorcycling is the superior book to More... which contains mostly the same stuff.

David B.
 

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+1 to Nick Ienatch and Sport Riding Techniques. I learned quite a bit from reading and rereading this book. I haven't read any of the other books mentioned, so I can't comment on them.
 

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I've got TOTW I & II. I think the concepts can be helpful but there's so much to cover and it is written quite dryly so they're a little hard to get through IMO. I have "Sport Riding Techniques" too but I haven't finished it yet. I think "Sport Riding Techniques" is easier to read but there's good material in both of them IMO.

Dan
(nb - ~2000miles experience)
 

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Thanks for the thoughts guys.

I went ahead and ordered Proficient and More proficient to go along with the rest.

Knowledge is power right? ;)

Let's see if I can translate all this over the next year and create a sharp experienced skillset. [thumbsup]
 

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Coming from a guy who hadn't had a bike in fifteen years, the book really helped me out and opened my eyes to some new techniques. My speeds thru the local San Diego canyons has comfortably doubled because of it. Those comments in the outside margins were annoying though and didn't seem to really go with the text.
 

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+1 on the "sport riding techniques"
 

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I've read the Profient, SR techniques, and the code books. My favorite is Sport Riding Techniques.

Twist 1&2 - Much more track oriented. Good info, but hard to fully use on the street. I felt my riding got more dangerous.
Preficient and SRT - Mostly the same info, but SRT clicked better with me.

I say read them all, and pull as much information as you can from each. Also, make sure to re-read one or more in 4-6 months. You'll find things that you missed the first time. Knowledge is power, and some of the best riders are the ones who recognize that.
 
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