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Hi. I am also really really wanting a Monster. I'm a newbie. This will be my first bike. I was just wondering if anyone can give an idea of what the actual maintinance costs are, and how frequent? My nearest dealer is 1.5 hours away :(. And is not having a tachometer a big problem? Also, I'm looking at getting an older Monster, just cause I konw I'll rash it at some point. Like a 97-99 or something, are there issues with the older Ducati's? What should I look out for when I'm looking? If maintinance costs are too high...I think I'll just have to get the SV650 . Great bike....but after seeing the guy at my place with a Black/Dark Monster.....I'm in love. I like the comment about the model with a cocaine habbit.....call me shallow....but we all die sometime.....just have the most fun while you're here. ;D
 

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This general subject has come up in dozens of different topics over the past few months. You might want to do a little research first.

I went 6 years on my 1997 with no unscheduled maintenance other than tires. I just barely had my forks revalved, since they were no longer working right after nearly 20,000 miles. They're now better than new.

Change the oil every 3000 miles, which you can easily do yourself at a cost of round $20.00. The 6000 and 18,000 mile services cost about $300. The 12,000 and 24,000 mile services are closer to $600.

The older ones have a little more character than the newer ones. There's no real reason not to consider all the way back to 1994. They didn't really change that much until 1999.
 

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I've had my 95 about a year and three months and 3,000 miles. Other than stuff I've screwed up and normal wear items it has been reliable and great fun. As i've fixed little things that were out of adjustment or almost worn out when I got it, I've found that it actually runs better and better with time and care.

I agree that some of the older models like mid to late 90's have more "character" in the little styling details and simplicity department. (For example, mine has aluminum handlebars and all the new ones I've seen at the dealer have chrome plated steel bars.)
 

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I just bought a used M750, 98 model and it runs like a new bike even though it has 18,670 on the clock. It appears to have been very well taken care of and even includes a couple mods (the sidestand doesn't auto retract and the bike can be started and warmed up while on it's sidestand). Thank you PO.

So far I think it's a fantastic machine. But alas, it's bone stock other than the above mentioned mods. So, I now know where all my Christmas money is going. ;D

Also, I'll be doing all my own maintenance so I won't have any idea of the cost of taking it to the dealer. I just love wrenching on motorcycles.
 
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I bought a used 99 M750 dark in late 2000. I haven't had any issues that I didn't cause. One small electrical problem with the back break light not working. The dealer and people on this list told me how to fix it. Jsut had to clean the contacts, did it myself in about 5 minutes.

Nothing major - I have all work done at a Guzzi dealer, except some oil changes.
 

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The `97 M750s have some weirdness about them, too. They work fine and look cool (Mmmmm... Silver), but they have a completely different engine than the newer 750s and some limitations to parts interchangeabillity.

--Fillmore
 

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You should probably stay away from the '97 M900. Most, if not all of them have heads that were made for the Elphant and have small valves and mild cams.
The smaller valves give the bike more midrange. I happen to prefer midrange. I owned a '96 M900 for a little while and rode the two bikes back to back several times. The '96 with the bigger valves had a tiny bit more top end power, but the '97 was easier to live with. The only way I could really tell that one engine had any more power than the other was the willingness of the bike to do power wheelies and how long the front end would stay six inches off of the ground. Even that might be due to a 2% difference in gearing (15/41 for the '97 vs 14/39 for the '96).

If your goal is drag racing acceleration and top speed then you might want to skip the '97. If all around ridability is more important, you should seriously consider it.
 

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....i have a '97 m900 w/hi-comp pistons, ferracci cans, and k&n filter....bought used in '99 w/7k and i have since put 5k on the bike...12k tune-up, valve adjustments, belts, one fork seal replacement, and a new battery have been the only work...i have been pleasantly surprised by the reliabilty i have experienced these 3 yrs and have no complaints of its performance...
 

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;D i just got a set of ST2 cams i'm puttin in my Pongo, my ratty 32400 mile 97 m900. Pongo's power just doesn't cut the mustard. runs out of steam at 110 mph with 15/40 gearing. should be rpm limited to about 133 mph with that gearing.

oh, and hi comp slugs and nichols flywheel are going in with the bump sticks. FCRs to follow thereafter, too. bru hahahahahaha.

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
chris
 

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Chris,

After the opinion-storm the ST2 vs SS vs whatever cams stirred up on the DOL, you HAVE to give a ride/performance report on the cams even though the other mods are going to color the results a bit. ;D
 
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