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This is probably a dumb question, but oh well. The question is do I really need to winterize my bike? Can I just start it up every couple of days and let it run a few minutes being thats what I do now anways just to hear the bike roar [cheeky]
 

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This is something you definitely don't want to do. By starting it up and only running a few minutes, you build up moisture in your oil and exhaust. Things don't really get hot enought to burn off the moisture unless you go for a good ride of 20 minutes or so. The moisture will build up in the oil and form acids and the exhaust will start to rust from the inside. You are better off changing the oil, putting in some fuel stabilizer and draining the carbs (if you have them).

My wife used to only drive one mile to work and back in the winter and I think I went through three mufflers on that vehicle in 60,000 miles because the moisture never got burned off.
 

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flyinlow has good advice. If you're not going to go out and ride the bike and get it warmed up, it's better to just let it sit without starting the motor 'til next spring.

A couple of suggestions I might add:

-- Pick up a "battery tender" to keep your battery charge maintained. (about $25 at a cycle shop, and very easy to use)
-- Put the bike on a rear stand to keep the tire from flat-spotting. (or just roll it around in your garage once a month-that's what I do)
-- Cover it with an old bed sheet to keep the dust off of it (Optional)
 

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+1 on what they said...good advice.
 

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Say, what's the advantage of a battery tender as opposed to just taking it out and putting it in my house? I usually just do this and charge her up in the spring when I'm ready to take the bike out. I've always been able to get 3-4 years out of my battery this way.

Thanks.
 

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Hailander said:
Say, what's the advantage of a battery tender as opposed to just taking it out and putting it in my house? I usually just do this and charge her up in the spring when I'm ready to take the bike out. I've always been able to get 3-4 years out of my battery this way.
There's certainly nothing wrong with your method. I've done that when storing my Sea Doo batteries, and it works fine (as long as you don't rest the battery on a concrete floor when stored).

If you install a Battery Tender connection, you can just leave the battery in the bike and the Tender will keep the charge "topped off". Tenders have circuitry that won't allow your battery to be overcooked.

I keep mine plugged in whenever I'm not riding the bike -- even during the warm months.
 

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I've also seen the idea of getting the desiccant for spark plugs to keep moisture from rusting them? Blatant promotion here: one of my clients sells a winterizing kit with the battery tender, sta-bil, & fogging oil. http://www.royalenfieldusa.com/winterizing-revised-smart-start-next-spring-p-6809.html

Hey - whaddya think - pretty cute ride for the city huh? http://scoot.net/gallery/pic.html?pic=163809 I'm wondering if I can afford it, especially since I should also buy a royal enfield as well.
 

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I like the scoot, Nina! It would be perfect for city use. [thumbsup] How much $ ?

The winterizing kit from the Enfield site looks like a good buy. The products are good -- I have 2 of those Battery Tender Jr.'s, and Sta-Bil is pretty much a staple in my garage. I don't typically use fogging oil in my bike, but it's certainly not a bad idea if you're gonna leave a bike sit unused for 6 months or more.

Interesting note -- the Enfield site suggests storing a bike with a full tank of fuel. This helps prevent corrosion inside a metal fuel tank, since there is little or no air to oxidize the inside of the tank. However, for Duc owners who have a plastic fuel tank this obviously isn't necessary. In fact, if I had a plastic fuel tank I would store the bike with little or no fuel in the tank. Today's gasoline loses significant volatility in a very short period of time (like 4-6 weeks). Sta-Bil will help prevent fuel system clogging/damage, but the gasoline will still degrade, and I would put fresh fuel in the tank ASAP in the spring.

My $.02
 

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Typically you don't need to fog the engine if its being stored 6 months or less, unless you are in a very high humidity environment, then you might want to.

Even though you have a plastic tank, there is something else to think about. Back in the old days, you wanted to keep a metal tank from rusting, you kept it full Now that you have plastic tanks you may think you don't need to do that. But you still have metal parts in there (fuel pump) and you should keep that submerged so rust doesn't form on any of those parts. The stabilizer will stop the fuel from creating varnish on those metal parts and keep the gas from going sour.
 

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Aha, this is good advice, and I appreciate it. I was down to the reserve but then took her out on Monday for one last little fling, and added about .5 gallons. But I was going to put in the sta-bil and then fill her up, so I won't do that now. The Lambretta is 3,200, and a new enfield is 5K, add 2.5K for the seriously gorgeous continental kit (which is the photo), and then 3K if I get a sidecar - yikes! If I get any of them, it's going to seriously cut into my designer shoe budget. Guess I better get to work so I can contribute to the consumer society.
 

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battery tender question... the directions on my battery tender are confusing to understand. Is there anything wrong with connecting both the positive terminal and negative terminal and then plugging it in? And does it matter which one you connect first whether it's plugged in before or after you do?
 

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MarkJJ said:
<snip> Is there anything wrong with connecting both the positive terminal and negative terminal and then plugging it in? And does it matter which one you connect first whether it's plugged in before or after you do?
It shouldn't matter much. I've installed the ring connectors to my battery, and when I park in the garage, I connect the tender cables and then plug into the wall outlet. This is essentially the same as attaching the + and - clips and then powering up the Tender.

BTW -- the ring connector takes about 10 minutes to install and makes the use of a tender much easier (no more lifting the tank and seat to get access to the battery). I just ran the end of the ring cable toward the back of the bike and tucked it under the side panels. It's hidden there, yet easy to find when I park in the garage and want to attach the Tender.
 

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This is all I do:

- Full tank of Non-oxygenated fuel
- Seafoam or stable in the fuel
- Battery Tender
- Bike on Stands
- Clean and Lube Chain
- Wash Bike (so you don't have to in the spring)
- Cover with sheet or Bike cover if you have one
- wash and dry helmet lining
thats about it
 

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nina said:
Yeah, I passed on the scooter, and likely will do a trade for the Enfield over the next few months.
So, ah, what are you planning to trade for the Enfield? The Monster?!? :eek:
 
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