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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!
I've been researching Monsters for a while now and learning all I can, man there have been quite a few different models over the years!
I currently own a 2004 Yamaha Vmax 1200. While I do love the bike, it would be great to have something a little lighter, and with at least ABS.

I've been interested in the Air-Cooled models, as they look simpler to maintain, only have two valves per cylinder, and no radiator.
I live in a rural area, so the closest Ducati dealer is about 2 hours away from me. Most of the maintenance will probably be done by me because of this. I have done plugs, oil changes, air filters, brake pads, a caliper rebuild, and such in the past on my bikes, but nothing too major.

Most of my riding is done on the backroads and twisties up here in Wisconsin.
What would you guys recommend from the Monster lineup from the last 10 years?
Will the 797 leave me severely wanting in the power department coming from the older Vmax?

Thanks in advance!! :)
 

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Never ridden a 797 but own a 1100S. What a bike! Light, flickable and TOOOOOOOOOOOOOOORQUE! So much fun to ride and short shift everywhere because ... it just goes. It's the Shelby Cobra of Ducatis! My Other bike, a 135HP Aprilia Mille-R hasn't been ridden this year. Because the Monster is that good and ... faster.
 

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Firstly, welcome to the Asylum!

I had a 1990 VMX12 for a few years and miss it greatly. While the 797 isn't slow, I think you will appreciate the 1100 more. You won't have that V-Boost feeling, but you will certainly appreciate the torque more. It's actually fairly close to the V-Max, but curb weight is about 200 lbs. less:eek:
 

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M1100S - H1100S - XT250
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Good decision to opt for a 2v if you are doing the most of the maintenance yourself.
Riding mostly backroad and twisties, definitely go for a 1100. Your next choice will be dry (pre-Evo) or wet clutch (Evo).

Service history will be essential for a happy, trouble free ownership. Even if it means paying a little extra or having more miles. For the same price I would rather buy a bike with 50.000 miles and annual service receipts than one with 5.000 miles who has been sitting in a shed for years.
A wise man once said "there's nothing more expensive than a cheap Ducati". Don't learn it the hard way.
 

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2012 Monster 796 ABS
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I agree with LeFraussie. I have a 796 ABS and think it's perfect for city riding and commuting. But if i was going to ride back road twisties or ride double, I would want a little more power. If you plan to have only one bike, 1100 would be better, especially since you are coming from a 1200 bike.

ABS is nice to have, but I wouldn't dismiss a well maintained non-ABS version either. DIY maintenance is more manageable with naked bikes like the Monster, and even better when it's air-cooled. But air-cool comes at a price. The heat can become unbearable when getting stuck in traffic, which hopefully won't be a problem to you.

Couple things to keep in mind for your choices:
  • How long is the service interval: my 2012 M796 has 7500 miles service interval, while the later ones have 15000 miles, much nicer 😭
  • How easy is it to service: to access the battery and air filter on my 2012 M796, I have to remove the tank fairings, then the tank itself. The later models, or the M1100, I see people just pull some pins and flip the tank up in seconds. 😭
(I still love my M796 btw 🤣)
 

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2012 Monster 796 ABS
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Oh, I see. So the tank flipping design is only with newer bikes, not model-specific. Yes, totally agree. It is such a hassle, which does get easier after a few times, but still makes me wish I had the flip design every time I work on the bike 🤣
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for all the responses guys!! I really appreciate it!
So I've found a couple of good deals on a couple Monster 1100's. I'm learning more about Monsters each day, and there is definitely quite a bit to learn since they have been around since the early 90s!

What are your guy's opinions of dry clutches? It looks like the M1100 from like the 2010-2013 or so years are the last of the dry clutch monsters, at least from what I've read. I've only ever had wet clutches.
It looks like dry clutches are easier to work on, but can have less longevity? Are they a bit more grabby as well?

One more question....what is your personal favorite Ducati that you've ridden? :)
 

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I bought my first Ducati in 1999, it was also my first bike. A 900SSie. Since then I have had MANY monsters and Supersports and briefly a 748 (As well as GUZZIs and an Aprilia Mille-R). A good well setup 900ie Monster is a great do it all bike, with simple fuel injection and flip-up tank, easier to maintain and ride. The M1100S I currently have is incredible. It's light, fast and handles beautifully. Point, squirt, you are there. The Footpegs go down too early to make it a great track weapon, and the high exhausts make luggage for touring ... challenging. That said, I LOVE IT!

Dry or wet clutch ... I used to be an advocate of dry clutches just for the noise, these days I could care less. Maybe the dry clutches wear more quickly but they don't dump clutch plate dust into your engine oil like a wet clutch either. So, win some, lose some. Don't make it a reason to buy, not buy the right bike. ;)
 

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Hello everyone!
I've been researching Monsters for a while now and learning all I can, man there have been quite a few different models over the years!
I currently own a 2004 Yamaha Vmax 1200. While I do love the bike, it would be great to have something a little lighter, and with at least ABS.

I've been interested in the Air-Cooled models, as they look simpler to maintain, only have two valves per cylinder, and no radiator.
I live in a rural area, so the closest Ducati dealer is about 2 hours away from me. Most of the maintenance will probably be done by me because of this. I have done plugs, oil changes, air filters, brake pads, a caliper rebuild, and such in the past on my bikes, but nothing too major.

Most of my riding is done on the backroads and twisties up here in Wisconsin.
What would you guys recommend from the Monster lineup from the last 10 years?
Will the 797 leave me severely wanting in the power department coming from the older Vmax?

Thanks in advance!! :)
Why not consider a smaller disp. bike--? Have a 2014 696 aircooled w/ ABS- Red-- 80 HP---359 LBs dry- max 400 or so w. full fuel,oils etc.-- don't think that much since no rad etc. Happens to be for sale. If I broke the forums with this am sorry, just trying to give an alternative to the big CC bikes. Bob329 561-762-6615 /[email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why not consider a smaller disp. bike--? Have a 2
Why not consider a smaller disp. bike--? Have a 2014 696 aircooled w/ ABS- Red-- 80 HP---359 LBs dry- max 400 or so w. full fuel,oils etc.-- don't think that much since no rad etc. Happens to be for sale. If I broke the forums with this am sorry, just trying to give an alternative to the big CC bikes. Bob329 561-762-6615 /[email protected]
Hi Bob, I would consider a smaller displacement too :). What's the mileage and price you are looking to get on your Ducati?
 

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2012 Monster 1100 EVO -- 1991 Honda Nighthawk 750 -- 2011 Monster 796 (wife's)
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My $0.02: I have an 1100 EVO and just love it. The torque is amazing and it is extremely light and nimble. Yes, a dry clutch would be nice, but I like the ride so much that it is not a big deal. chris900ssie gets it right!
 

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Thank you for all the responses guys!! I really appreciate it!
So I've found a couple of good deals on a couple Monster 1100's. I'm learning more about Monsters each day, and there is definitely quite a bit to learn since they have been around since the early 90s!

What are your guy's opinions of dry clutches? It looks like the M1100 from like the 2010-2013 or so years are the last of the dry clutch monsters, at least from what I've read. I've only ever had wet clutches.
It looks like dry clutches are easier to work on, but can have less longevity? Are they a bit more grabby as well?

One more question....what is your personal favorite Ducati that you've ridden? :)
Track: 1098R
Street: 1299 Superleggera
Monster: Completely custom M900, S4RS is a close second
 

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The M1100 is also a total cock ache to get to the battery, same as the 796. It's get no less frustrating with practice but faster.
Do you have to drop it out the bottom of the bike, like the 1200? A weird design.

If you had a bigger displacement bike, it's hard to go backwards to a smaller bike.
I suspect I'd be asking where did my power go?
 

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Do you have to drop it out the bottom of the bike, like the 1200? A weird design.
No, you first have to remove the tank covers, then the underseat storage thing, then lift the tank and either support it somehow - I suspend it from the roof with straps - or go further and disconnect the super fragile quick release fitting for the fuel hoses. All in all, about 20 bolts and 30 minutes. The battery sits behind the airbox and above the throttle bodies.
 

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No, you first have to remove the tank covers, then the underseat storage thing, then lift the tank and either support it somehow - I suspend it from the roof with straps - or go further and disconnect the super fragile quick release fitting for the fuel hoses. All in all, about 20 bolts and 30 minutes. The battery sits behind the airbox and above the throttle bodies.
Oh God, that is much worse. WTF? :cautious:
 

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Exactly, WTF??!?! I think they let the apprentice do the designing that day 'cos Luigi was off sick from too much Chianti!

or

A strategy to allow dealers to earn more money because fitting a new battery no longer takes 10 mins but well over an hour.

Either way, it is ****. I have a VERY small LiOn batter in my Bike and have considered relocating it under the seat.
 

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Exactly, WTF??!?! I think they let the apprentice do the designing that day 'cos Luigi was off sick from too much Chianti!

or

A strategy to allow dealers to earn more money because fitting a new battery no longer takes 10 mins but well over an hour.

Either way, it is ****. I have a VERY small LiOn batter in my Bike and have considered relocating it under the seat.
I suspect it was for mass centralization/distribution, LiOn batteries were not common then and 9 lbs is not insignificant, especially on a sub-400 lb bike.
 

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I suspect it was for mass centralization/distribution, LiOn batteries were not common then and 9 lbs is not insignificant, especially on a sub-400 lb bike.
Nope, the battery is where it has been on every Monster (up to that point 2009) since 1993. The issue is that the Tank doesn't have a hinge to flip it up like they used to. And to get to the 2 Bolts that hold the actual tank on, you have to remove 18 (or so) to get the tank covers off and Storage tray. They just planned it badly. the covers shouldn't have to come off to remove the Tank. Its great that they do, I can change the colour of my bike in an hour, of getting paint damage repaired is easy. Its put together like a modern car, everything is under a ton of Plastic .... hmmmm... when did AUDI buy Ducati?
 

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Nope, the battery is where it has been on every Monster (up to that point 2009) since 1993. The issue is that the Tank doesn't have a hinge to flip it up like they used to. And to get to the 2 Bolts that hold the actual tank on, you have to remove 18 (or so) to get the tank covers off and Storage tray. They just planned it badly. the covers shouldn't have to come off to remove the Tank. Its great that they do, I can change the colour of my bike in an hour, of getting paint damage repaired is easy. Its put together like a modern car, everything is under a ton of Plastic .... hmmmm... when did AUDI buy Ducati?
My bad. I've only owned my '95 (lots of relocation to accommodate a lot of one-off bits - shock horizontally mounted under seat, for example) and have only worked on couple of others, mostly tires and brakes. I missed your post... I thought the 1100 battery was in the same location as the 1200. I don't think it's that straight forward, as there fewer places to "hide" a largish battery on a naked bike while keeping it clean. Isn't the trellis on the 1200 shorter than the 1100? The battery location change may have more to do with that than a design "fix." Fortunately, battery service is only required every few years. Other than having to remove all the bolts off the tank covers, is it that much more difficult/time consuming to change the battery vs. a M900/S4/etc.?
 
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