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Hi Everybody,

Just joined. Haven't got a Monster yet, but getting close. Will be looking for an S2R next year. A close second will be a Monster 1000.

I'm in Adelaide, Australia now, but am from Canada. I was working at a Ducati dealer in Toronto in 2003/04 just before I moved Down Under. I'd always loved the Monster but when I saw the S4R being uncrated, I thought it was the perfect incarnation of the Monster chassis. That was always my go-to bike at the end of the day when we'd take the demos home. While obviously no comparison with the 996 engine, I prefer the S2R's for ease and cost of maintenance, as well as the lack of plumbing, etc, that comes with the liquid cooled engine. Working at the dealership was great fun and I got to ride every model except for the M620 and the 800cc's during that time. For two seasons I rode almost nothing but Ducatis, and my Norton, only taking my own bikes out now and then just to so they didn't seize up. Though I'd always loved Ducatis, it was only after riding them that I truly gained a passion for the Italian brand.

I've been riding since I was about 5. Started with a Honda CT70 which I rode until I was 17 and bought my first street bike, a 1972 Honda CB350. I moved through a series of 1970's Jap bikes, as they were dirt cheap in the 1990's. Did track days with Honda CB350's and a 500. I was at odds with my peers, as they were all buying the latest sports bikes, etc, but I stuck with machines older than me. Best thing was that it didn't seem to matter what bikes we had once we were scratching through the twisty lake roads through Ontario, only good tires and fresh fork oil seemed to worry me at that point.
At 22 I bought the bike I'd been lusting after since I was 12, a 1972 Norton Commando Roadster, I still own and ride a 1971 Roadster and am Norton nut (President of our local Norton club).

Throughout the years I've had other bikes come and go, an 82 Suzuki Katana, BSA Bantam, 86 Suzuki DR600, 76 Honda XL350, 74 Suzuki TS185, 78 Yamaha XT500, and a few others.
In my garage now is the aforementioned Norton Commando, a 2005 Gas Gas EC300, an 81 Suzuki PE175 (selling it) and a pair of 72-73 Yamaha 175 enduro projects.

Just waiting now to sell the PE175 and save a few more dollars, then I'll be shopping. The S2R's are getting hard to find, unfortunately.

Donald
 

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Welcome to the forum, Don. I can’t believe you joined four days ago and no one welcomed you yet. Tell us why you moved to Australia and how that is working out for you. That is a long way from home. Lots of forum members down there.
 

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Thanks Duc96cr,

My move to Australia is the age old story of boy meets girl with a funny accent, girl's visa runs out so boy follows girl to the other side of the world where everybody has the same funny accent.
That was 16 years ago, still got the girl with the funny accent, and even have a kid with a funny accent now. I was working at the Ducati shop in Toronto at the time, we also sold Lamborghini's, and my first job in Adelaide was at a dirt bike wreckers in an industrial area across the road from a dump. It was a bit of a culture shock.

Hard to compare Toronto to Adelaide. Toronto is a big metropolis, the financial capitol of Canada, etc. While at the time I enjoyed the exciting lifestyle that comes with city living, I'd have to travel for 2 hours to get to any decent riding roads and I couldn't afford a house with a garage. Adelaide is a small city that the rest of Australia tends to forget even exists, and I kinda like it like that. I live 20 minutes from the city centre, 20 minutes from the beach, and I'm pretty much in the country on a 1/2 acre with some of the best riding roads I've ever experienced literally at my doorstep.
Modern Canada and Australia are essentially siblings separated at birth, having both been colonized by England, and we share almost identical histories, good and bad. Our post war immigration was also identical, with many families splitting up and some coming to Australia and others going to Canada (and the U.S.) I've met two 2nd generation Italians here who's family I know back home. So in many ways it was an easy transition.

Bike culture is a bit different, the bits I liked about back home are more mainstream here. Where mainstream bike culture in North America was generally divided into two exclusive camps that didn't cross over much, cruisers and sport bikes. The rest of us (classics, racers, etc) seemed to be on the fringe. Of course, I'm generalizing. In Oz, there's a lot more people who are into many different aspects of bike culture. The biker with a leather vest and 'colours' will be riding his Harley one day, then the next day he's out on his CBR1100XX, still wearing the vest and open face helmet. Actually, I think the best description of Aussie bike culure was summed up when I went to an Italian bike show the first month I arrived. A guy in a flannel shirt, a long goatee, and the most glorious mullet I'd ever seen hanging out the back of his open face helmet, showed up on his bevel drive 900SS and proceeded to pull a mono down the footpath to announce his arrival.

Anyway, ya, I like it down here. Though I do miss the abundance of trees and fresh water back home.
 

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Great story ,Don. I have a couple of friends that moved down there to work in a spring factory. They got booted out when their visas ran out. I’ve always wanted to visit. Seems like an interesting country and culture.
 

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Over here in coastal New South Wales we have rivers with water in, bigger mountains, more rain, green most of the year..
 

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I’d like to visit there , too. Problem is, that’s a hell of a long trip. Maybe when they get 19 under control.
 

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I’d like to visit there , too. Problem is, that’s a hell of a long trip. Maybe when they get 19 under control.
Ya, we ain't going anywhere for a while. Real shitter because we were planning a bit 10 week trip back home next July/August, but now we can't plan anything. Ah well, better than catching and spreading the Coconut.
 

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Over here in coastal New South Wales we have rivers with water in, bigger mountains, more rain, green most of the year..
He he, I did a roadtrip with my best mate and his new wife from Sydney to Cairns about 8 years ago. Poor girl was stuck in a van with us for weeks and had never met me before.
We hit up just about every river, waterfall, and swimming hole we could find along the way. I was a bit worried the first few times because I was finding it harder to swim than usual. All the sudden it dawned on me that I hadn't swum in fresh water for years so didn't have the buoyancy of salt water to assist me. Was a bit of a shock for a guy who grew up on a small lake in Ontario.

The riding out on the East is superb, both on and off road, I'm heaps jealous. There are tremendous riding roads here but they are finite, pretty much just within 100kms of Adelaide. That's good and bad, as I don't have to travel at all to get to them, which makes it easier with a family, I don't need to plan road trips, just go out for a few hours after mowing the lawn.

When I first arrived and went dirtbiking, my new mates said we'd go riding through some creeks. I was excited to do some water crossings. At the end of the day I asked them why didn't go to any of the creeks they talked about, they told me we'd been riding in creeks to whole day. I was like, bullshit, I didn't see even a puddle. They pointed out we were in a creek at that very moment and I looked around and said, "There's no water, which makes this just a dry ravine."

We were going to live in Sydney when we first arrived, spent the first month there. But we moved in with my wife's mum in Adelaide and got settled, then realised how cheap houses were here.
 

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At least you're close to the good riding roads; Lobethal, Strathalbyn, Victor Harbour.......
 

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At least you're close to the good riding roads; Lobethal, Strathalbyn, Victor Harbour.......
Yes! I'm literally one street away from Main Rd, Coromandel Valley. A direct (via the most twistiest roads!) ride to Clarendon, Meadows, Ashbourne, etc etc. In fact yesterday morning while sitting on my deck enjoying a coffee, I heard the South Aussie Ducati Club rumble through the valley on their monthly ride.

You've clearly been out here before.
 

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Used to be, back in my Ducati 750GT days... 1974 to 1978. You know it's SA by the Stobie Pole in the background! Now in Northern NSW.
225267
 
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