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Discussion Starter #1
so i recently got my hands on a 2002 monster 620 ie, quite cheap, and has somee work needed to be done. I removed the front fairing, backseat fairing, mounted a handlebar mirror etc. The motorcycle was operated by a very short woman, who had the bike lowered, i didn't think much off it at the time, but as off now i haven't been able to raise it. I am no wizard with tools so a mechanic i had servicing the bike told me there were just two nuts i had to loosen. That turned out to be easier said than done, one is not reachable with a wrench and the other one simply won't move, even after what seemed like a breakthrough. I know nothing about suspension systems or how they work, but the kit used to lower it is a sachs and i would love if anyone could help with the issue. I'll leave some pictures aswell.
 

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The Sachs shock absorber looks like a standard unit. can't tell if spring is same.
This is what a tie rod should look like.


224864


Notice the rod itself has cast in flat sections both ends as this one, or a single one at mid way. The method is; loosen the two end locknuts, then rotate the rod itself using these cast in 'nuts', in either direction to extend or shorten. (different threaded ends) increase length by 1/2 inch should add over an inch to ride height. Easier said than done on the bike, as you discovered, hard to get spanner in.
Most just remove the rod to adjust.

Note; There was a poor mans method to shorten, lower suspension, instead of buying an aftermarket 'shorter' rod, some just cut the ends off, ground the threaded ends down of the eyelets and fitted..

From your pics, it may have been done this way as I don't see these adjusters, and it looks like the ends have been ground rough, OR, could be a different rod.
Sometimes removing just the top end completely, helps to free it all up and unwind it. Don't unwind too far though, it will weaken it, if at the near end of the thread. check how far it comes out. If it won't unwind enough you might have to consider a new stock rod, sorry, I don't know the actual length.

Once you have it at the length required, fit it back, next step is the top shock spring adjuster, to set preload. It will be different after ride height change.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is what a tie rod should look like.


View attachment 224864

Notice the rod itself has cast in flat sections both ends as this one, or a single one at mid way. The method is; loosen the two end locknuts, then rotate the rod itself using these cast in 'nuts', in either direction to extend or shorten. (different threaded ends) increase length by 1/2 inch should add over an inch to ride height. Easier said than done on the bike, as you discovered, hard to get spanner in.
Most just remove the rod to adjust.

Note; There was a poor mans method to shorten, instead of buying an aftermarket 'shorter' rod, some just cut the ends off, ground the threaded ends down of the eyelets and fitted..

From your pics, it may have been done this way as I don't see these adjusters, and it looks like the ends have been ground rough, OR, could be a different rod.
Sometimes removing just the top end completely, helps to free it all up and unwind it. Don't unwind too far though, it will weaken it, if at the near end of the thread. check how far it comes out. If it won't unwind enough you might have to consider a new stock rod, sorry, I don't know the actual length.

Once you have it at the length required, fit it back, next step is the top shock spring adjuster, to set preload. It will be different after ride height change.

Hope this helps.
Hi, thanks for the response. I see your picture, but the rod on mine has only two nuts, one on each side, which, after some wrestling, i was able to "loosen" only for a couple of turns, until it seemed to hit a dead end. the rod however seems to have some 'bitemarks' as if someone used pliers on it, perhaps to rotate it, what i am getting out of this is that i need to loosen and pull out the axle that is holding the rod (and the suspension?) and extend it from there. How difficult will this be, anything i need to keep in mind, how would i go about changing the preload, what do i need to think about? should i tie the bike up with a rope or will just putting it on a rear wheel rest do?
 

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Hi, thanks for the response. I see your picture, but the rod on mine has only two nuts, one on each side, which, after some wrestling, i was able to "loosen" only for a couple of turns, until it seemed to hit a dead end. the rod however seems to have some 'bitemarks' as if someone used pliers on it, perhaps to rotate it, what i am getting out of this is that i need to loosen and pull out the axle that is holding the rod (and the suspension?) and extend it from there. How difficult will this be, anything i need to keep in mind, how would i go about changing the preload, what do i need to think about? should i tie the bike up with a rope or will just putting it on a rear wheel rest do?
Honestly unless you're planning on some track days or really technical suspension setup. I'd go back to the factory rod. Adjustable ones are pretty nice and all that, but high quality versions are not cheap. And you need that full pivoting action from the ball end. Not just an eyelet or bushing. That particular one looks slightly suspect in a few ways. They're all over eBay. In a 3 minute search I found one practically like new for 15 bucks and free shipping. I've had mine apart a dozen times but I can't remember the exact order I usually follow. I want to say disconnect the rod up top and take pressure on the shock. Then you can remove the single bolt connecting them both to the swingarm. Just don't forget you will have to somehow support the entire weight of the rear of the bike while doing this.
 

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Good advice,
I would be concerned if that rod had been cut, trying to raise the height would leave too little thread. Can't be sure if that is in fact the case, but if you want it back to original height, then a new/secondhand rod would be a good idea.

Firstly, I would get yourself a manual for the bike, see here;

The two end nuts are lock nuts, the reason they only loosen a little and then stop, is eyelets are fully screwed in,
obviously done to lower. Yes, you will need some vice grips or similar to rotate rod. those marks indicate that how it was done. I called them 'eyelets' but ball joints may be correct term.etc.
I also see some rust on the threads, spray some lube, CRC,or something first, then try to rotate the rod.
Let us know if you can't. If it can't be turned, then you have to remove it. As said, the shock is on the same bolt and you must support the bike.

The spring preload is easy to turn with any shock adjusting tool, It's the large castellation nut at top of shock, you can see the long thread on the shock. As for correct setting, Hmm. usually measured, but if the rod has been changed,
might not apply. Let's get the rod sorted first.
 
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