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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My cousin just told me about something called acid dipping. I did a search for acid dipping & only came up with battery acid, but I apologize beforehand if someone already posted it under a different heading. I just never heard of it until today & it sounds quite bizarre to me.

Pardon his English, he was not born here & is not a native speaker:
one of my supplier who also do drag race just came visit me, I told him about your project, he gave me this web and told me you may find what you need in here, give a shot, and next week he is going to CA to meet his buddy who also known bikes a lot, he will mention your project and see any feed back from his friend, my friend here himself can do metal acid dipping some kind of stuff, I have not much clue, something that he said after the dip, he can get your bike with that gun metal green look, if whole bike, he has someone in Paterson can dip the whole bike, pricey but good, he said is better than paint, last much longer.
Found this on the internet, sounds interesting:
Acid Dipping Primer
Acid dipping is most closely associated with racing, where the process is used to thin steel body panels to reduce weight. A lot of '60s factory Super Stock cars had their sheetmetal dipped until it was literally paper-thin in the search for that extra few ounces of weight.

While it is true that acid dipping removes metal, you have to leave the panels in the solution for a long period of time to seriously weaken them. The dipping process used by Auto-Metal and other facilities removes very little metal, but does remove everything that isn't steel. Paint, body filler, caulking, undercoating, and rust will be eaten away by the caustic solution.

To prepare a body for a dip, the doors, hood, and trunk lid should be removed. That allows the acid to reach all the nooks and crannies in the shell. The other parts can be dipped separately or with the shell. All rubber plugs, brake and gas lines, and wiring must be removed as well. If it's still attached and ain't metal, it's history.

The amount of time the body spends in the acid tank depends on the amount of paint and undercoating it has. The body is taken out of the tank several times as the technicians check the progress and scrape off paint and other stuck-on gunk. The Starliner's paint proved surprisingly tough, requiring almost two weeks at Auto-Metal. Good thing the body was made from good old American steel or there wouldn't have been any of it left.

When the body is pulled out of the tank for the last time, you'll notice a whitish coating and scale on the metal as it dries. This is a phosphate coating, a byproduct of the dipping process, that protects the bare metal against rust. This coating must be removed before paint work, especially the residue in seams and panels, or it will seep through and ruin your bodywork and paint. That's why it's a good idea to strip the body down as far as possible before dunking it in the acid.

When the body comes out of the tank, every hidden blemish, dent, and rust hole will be exposed.
 

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Interesting but a bit scary. We used to use caustic soda in the textile industry & if you walked thru a small spill, the bottom on your shoes literally smoked.
 

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What you found and what your cousin is talking about are two different things. Your article is talking about a method to strip the paint off of steel prior to restoring/repainting the body work.

Your cousin is talking about a process called "Parkerizing."

Here is a paragraph I got off of a gun refinishing site. I used to be a gunsmith and when your cousin mentioned the "green" color I knew what he was getting at...though Parkerizing can be colors other than green... Here is the cut/paste, if you need more info, Google "Parkerizing."



PARKERIZING
What is Parkerizing?
Parkerizing otherwise known for Automotive and Motorcycle (and useful for) as Phosphating and/or Phoshatizing, where outside of the Gun industry, Parkerizing is an unknown, and is generally a do-it-yourself project with the right equipment. It also stands for Manganese Phosphate for guns and also Zinc Manganese Phosphating for guns. US new Factory is generally soft, and from those who use normal phosphate is generally way too light. If you want better than factory and better than lesser results, or good results though, the chemistry is important. If you don't have to play with the Parkerizing formula with additional chemistry, and don't have to make the metal black first before Parkerizing, then your results will be much better. Here you will find in addition to chemically-complete kits, tips, suggestions, and free support up front to select and get the best results for your own gun parts, Tools, Auto Motorcycle Restoration Hardware, Automotive tools, Harley Davidson Hardware, and miscellaneous with a Parkerizing that is without doubt the best, and in easiest to use and most rugged:

Here is a link to the rest of the page...they are trying to sell Parkerizing kits to do small parts or entire guns.
http://shootersolutions.com/parkerizing.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Old-Duckman said:
What you found and what your cousin is talking about are two different things. Your article is talking about a method to strip the paint off of steel prior to restoring/repainting the body work.

Your cousin is talking about a process called "Parkerizing."

Here is a paragraph I got off of a gun refinishing site. I used to be a gunsmith and when your cousin mentioned the "green" color I knew what he was getting at...though Parkerizing can be colors other than green... Here is the cut/paste, if you need more info, Google "Parkerizing."



PARKERIZING
What is Parkerizing?
Parkerizing otherwise known for Automotive and Motorcycle (and useful for) as Phosphating and/or Phoshatizing, where outside of the Gun industry, Parkerizing is an unknown, and is generally a do-it-yourself project with the right equipment. It also stands for Manganese Phosphate for guns and also Zinc Manganese Phosphating for guns. US new Factory is generally soft, and from those who use normal phosphate is generally way too light. If you want better than factory and better than lesser results, or good results though, the chemistry is important. If you don't have to play with the Parkerizing formula with additional chemistry, and don't have to make the metal black first before Parkerizing, then your results will be much better. Here you will find in addition to chemically-complete kits, tips, suggestions, and free support up front to select and get the best results for your own gun parts, Tools, Auto Motorcycle Restoration Hardware, Automotive tools, Harley Davidson Hardware, and miscellaneous with a Parkerizing that is without doubt the best, and in easiest to use and most rugged:

Here is a link to the rest of the page...they are trying to sell Parkerizing kits to do small parts or entire guns.
http://shootersolutions.com/parkerizing.html
Actually, I did recently read about Parkerizing. They used that on the old Harley WLA. I thought it was just similiar but different. I also read about Bonderizing or something like that for the old Harley 1948 Panhandle.
Thanks for clearing that up for me.
 

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During my formative years, I was sent to a factory that reconditioned machinery.
The metal castings went into a caustic bath then into a hot water bath.
Aluminium went into a trichloethylene tank again followed by a hot water bath.
Brought those parts up whistle clean
 
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