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I went for my first long ride on the Monster today. I took US 1 south from Monterey down past Big Sur and back. It was an absolutely beautiful day and the scenery/ twisties were outstanding. The only problem is that my hands feel really wierd now that the ride is over. I can't seem to grip much, and can hardly hold my cigarette to smoke it? Is this normal for a two hour ride. (considering that I just started riding) It feels like I've lost some strength in my throttle hand. Any ideas?
 
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Adam,

I haven't been riding long myself and I had a similar problem on my first few long rides. Hands would cramp and/or feel weak and numb afterwards. I realized I was supporting much too much of my weight on my bars (clip-ons actually) and that I had a bit of a death grip. I just began making an effort to remember to support my weight with my abs and back, and to relax my shoulders. I still get a bit of a death grip when in the twisties for a while, but I use the small straights to flex my hands and ease my grip.

This seems to work. I did 150 miles today (a few errands then Sac to Napa and back) and I feel friggin' great!
 

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Probably just not used to it. When I first got back in to things, my hands literally ached. It
 

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No worries Adam. We just need to do some riding and you'll feel fine. When I first started riding it literally felt like a work out when I was done. It's all in how you support yourself. The more you ride, the better your motorcycle posture will get. Give me a day this week to meet for coffee. Any day after 4:30PM.
 
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I had a constant ache in my hands and arms the first couple weeks on owning a monster. After taht phase I found I would get numbness in my hands on long trips or in the twisties. Now, no such problems. I eventually learned to support my wieght with my legs and stomach, grip the tag with my legs for support, and only use hands for control. It really works out well. Occasionally if I notice hands/arms are hurting, I adjust riding position. It can usually be atributed to poor technique or posture. Just keep riding and try to find what is most comfotable
 
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Stop being a p*ssy and just ride the d*mn thing!

You got it and now you're whining.?! "Oh..my hand's hurt!! I won't be able to masterbate tonight." Wah wah wah!! Deal with it!!

It takes real man to ride a Monster. If it was easy, all the squids would be doing it too!



Just giving you a hard time wuss. ;)

I posted almost 2 years ago on a similar thread. It does take some conditioning but you'll get used to it!! ;)
 

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i have clip-ons and my hands go numb in city riding. i've spent full days on the road with no problems. the difference is lane splitting and stop-n-go traffic requires me to use the levers more (weight on the grips). as others said, loose on the grips, bent arms. support your weight with your body. you will also find the bike handles better.
 
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We found this to be a serious problem during our 4 hour endurance race... the more aggressive riders on the team had problems with hands going numb. The more relaxed riders didn't complain of the problem...My last time out riding on the street I noticed the numbness... but I have put it on the fact that I gained 20 lbs. since I last rode a bike!
 

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That is a very common complaint of new riders. Especially about their throttle hand. It will gradually go away as you ride more and your muscles get used to the new stresses. Provided you don't have carpal tunnel, in which case the discomfort would be present in many other activities as well.

Here's a few tips that can help. Wear properly fitting gloves when you ride. If the gloves fit well they can provide more conistant grip on the throttle and dampen vibration. Avoid putting weight on your wrists and hands. Grip the tank with your knees and use your lower back muscles to hold your body weight. The handlebars are there for controls and steering input, not for balancing your weight. Keep your upper body loose. Don't tense your muscles. Even in the midst of a tight turn, you should be able to wiggle your elbows freely without upsetting the bike. Think loose and relaxed for your arms and hands -- it eventually becomes automatic.
 

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What everyone else said. To add a small and weird detail from my experience - I recently switched back from clipons to stock bars with an additional 1/2 riser to overcome chronic neck pains from the more bent over position. Never had any problems with extra weight on the wrists or hands with the clipons.

So after I go back to stock, first two rides brought back something I had forgotten about the stock riding position. Despite the fact that I am pretty good at keeping loose and relaxed, I noticed I was getting arm pump especially in my left forearm after just a short time on the bike. That had happened before with the stock bars and went away when I went to clipons.

My theory after analyzing the way I feel in both bike setups, is that the stock position makes me feel off balance just a little at anything less than expressway speeds. In other words, I feel like I'm between straightening all the way up and leaning forward enough to put some weight on my hands and arms. I think that sensation of wanting to either lean more forward or further back has me tensing some forearm muscles without realizing it. Weird!

I think I will stick with the stock + 1/2" for now, because I can avoid the arm pump if I try, but I couldn't get over the neck pains with the clipons.

Like was mentioned above, I like the Throttle Rocker; and ride relaxed - flap your elbows every minute or so and practice covering and uncovering clutch and brake levers with your fingers every minute or two. Thumb your turn signal cancel button frequently, too. All these things force you to move your hands and help keep them relaxed.
 

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also... wear gloves

I remember having a similar experience when I started riding (don't think it was ever that bad). Mostly sore palms. After starting to wear gloves, it becomes much more comfortable. Again, it'll be awkward at first, but you'll get used to it. They'll protect your palms from the vibrations, and do a little bit to help against the wind beating up your forearms. Just be careful to find some that fit properly. If they're too small it'll be awkward to reach for the brake/clutch, but if they're too big they'll bunch up and be uncomfortable... plus you won't be able to grip anything with your fingertips.

On a side note, my hands are pretty screwed up. four breaks and four dislocations in my fingers on the right hand... two breaks on the left. (over the last three years, from mtn biking and football). There isn't any kind of disfiguration or anything (though my right pinkie looks kinda screwed up if I spread out my hand), but I think not all my nerves are workin' right.
 

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This product will help alleviate any numbness and strengthen the muscles of your hands and arms. I used it to cure "Cyclers Palsy" from bicycle racing. :)

http://www.catspaw.com/store.html

-Loser
 

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musxcle fatigue

Hey ,on long rides I have found a tank bag with something soft like a towel or sweat shirt in the top great for taking some of the load off the hands & wrists.Just set it up so you can rest alittle of your weight on the tank bag.I've knocked off 600 mile days when trying to stay ahead of weather or winter runs to Daytona,but then you have to deal with the numb butt & cramped legs.You cant have everything but when you just gotta ride this makes it more enjoyable. 95 m900
 

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Adam,

I haven't been riding long myself and I had a similar problem on my first few long rides. Hands would cramp and/or feel weak and numb afterwards. I realized I was supporting much too much of my weight on my bars (clip-ons actually) and that I had a bit of a death grip. I just began making an effort to remember to support my weight with my abs and back, and to relax my shoulders. I still get a bit of a death grip when in the twisties for a while, but I use the small straights to flex my hands and ease my grip.

This seems to work. I did 150 miles today (a few errands then Sac to Napa and back) and I feel friggin' great!
Quite correct, You need to strenghten your core. You support your body from your torso not your hands. I also purchased a set of handle bar risers and this helped a lot. When I ride my hands rest very lightly on the grips. No Fatigue.
Good Luck
 

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When i start too ride my bike i feel pain in hand during half hours,but that was only one week,noe in september i was traweling with my wife from Maribor in Slovenia too Zadar in Dalmatia in Croatia.
The distance was 400km long and we was traveling five and a half hours,the ride was only 70km on highway else was on road vith nice long and shorts detour.wery nice trip.
After riding i was dont feeling pain in hands and backs,after two days we go back home and it was the same thing,no pain.
best redgards,Drazen,Maribor Slovenia.
 
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