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Hey guys, im looking to buy a bike within a year so im doing my research as opposed to just going out and getting the first thing that looks cool.


I REALLY dig the look of the "naked sportsbike". That being said i've been looking at both the Monster and the Speed Triple. Im not really looking to compare any particular model of the Monster, just whatever you have or have experienced.


please bare with me b/c like i said, i am new to the bike world, just trying to figure things out
 
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You say you are new to the bike world... the speed triple is definitely too much bike for you... and some would argue a 620 is too much...

Either way, include in your research the MSF course... its some of the best money you will spend.

as for opinions... I was looking at both, and I also looked at the 675 Triumph too.. but there was just something untangible about the Monster.
 

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superspud said:
About the MSF
The Motorcycle Safety Foundation is the internationally recognized developer of the comprehensive, research-based, Rider Education and Training System (MSF RETS). RETS curricula promotes lifelong-learning for motorcyclists and continuous professional development for certified RiderCoaches and other trainers. MSF also actively participates in government relations, safety research, public awareness campaigns and the provision of technical assistance to state training and licensing programs. http://www.msf-usa.org/
:police: [thumbsup]
 
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I thought of something else.... SEARCH.. this has been discussed before, you may get different opinions now than were given before...
 

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the speed triple is alot more bike than you need if you're new to bikes. a 695 monster would be a decent bike...or a used 620.
 

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I had thoughts about moving up to the triple next season after buying the new 695 Monster. I hadn't ridden in years until this bike, and it was a very friendly way back into the sport. That all being said, the 695 has exceeded my expectations in an "entry level" bike now that my riding has progressed over this season. Plenty of power, forgiving ride, and that oh so exclusive feel and look of a Ducati are making me stick with my baby (mods disease is kicking in) for a long while yet.

Top that off with world class service from the NYC Ducati boys, and I am a lifelong Ducatista.

Semper Ducati! [thumbsup]
 

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Le Pirate said:
the speed triple is alot more bike than you need if you're new to bikes. a 695 monster would be a decent bike...or a used 620.
Probably true if it's his first bike and he doesn't want to spend a LOT of time in a parking lot practicing, but I personally think it's insane to buy a slower new bike to learn on for that reason. If you want a learner, get a used crapper for $1500 and sell it for the same price. It would suck to outgrow your ride while still making payments. Even if he bought if for cash, he'd be ready for the triple right after the Monster's value dropped significantly, compared to what he paid.
 

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+1 on getting a cheap learner, just because well, you'll probably drop it. and it's cheap, and that's a good entry into the bike world to see if you even like it. i started on a 1983 nighthawk 550 i bought for 100 bucks, put about 700 into it to get it running, rode it for like 3 months and sold it for 1300 and used that money(plus a little more) to get my ducati off a friend.
 

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Take the advice given. You are too new for a Speed Triple. That bike will annihilate you if you are not experienced.

A used 620 or 750 will be more than enough. If you want to go with a new bike, get the 695, even then, that bike might be a bit much.

getting on a bike, rowing thru the gears, and going fast in a straight line is easy. Anyone can learn how to do that in a day. Its the other stuff that takes time, and experience to master.
 

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Did anyone here buy a nice new bike and learn on it? I don't know anyone who didn't start by buying a cheap bike.

If you get one that's cheap and pretty old, it won't drop in value on you unless you pick a lemon that blows up. Something that already has cosmetic damage is perfect as it won't lose value when you drop it. It's pretty much a "free" bike to learn on and abuse.

It took me about 3 months to completely outgrow my 1982 Yamaha XS650, but it felt FAST when I first rode it, since it was my first bike.

Also, like others said, the MSF course is extremely helpful. Not only do they teach you all the basics and what to look out for on the road, but you can gauge your natural ability against the other people in the course. I definitely saw a few people during my course who would have been wise to rethink the whole motorcycle thing. If you can't control a 250 by the second riding session, you don't want to be on the road.
 

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ajax said:
Did anyone here buy a nice new bike and learn on it? I don't know anyone who didn't start by buying a cheap bike.

If you get one that's cheap and pretty old, it won't drop in value on you unless you pick a lemon that blows up. Something that already has cosmetic damage is perfect as it won't lose value when you drop it. It's pretty much a "free" bike to learn on and abuse.

It took me about 3 months to completely outgrow my 1982 Yamaha XS650, but it felt FAST when I first rode it, since it was my first bike.

Also, like others said, the MSF course is extremely helpful. Not only do they teach you all the basics and what to look out for on the road, but you can gauge your natural ability against the other people in the course. I definitely saw a few people during my course who would have been wise to rethink the whole motorcycle thing. If you can't control a 250 by the second riding session, you don't want to be on the road.
I bought and started out on a 2004 BMW R1100S. Never dropped it, or my Duc's
 

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ajax said:
Did anyone here buy a nice new bike and learn on it? I don't know anyone who didn't start by buying a cheap bike.
I never rode in my life before I got my 695. I was talked out of the Speed Triple by my friend who was looking out for my best interest. That bike definitely would have been too much for me as a first bike. I am super happy with the 695 as its becoming more me everyday. Plus, if they were both parked next to each other, more people would go "oooh a Ducati". Funny thing is, everyone thinks I paid 20g for it.
 

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+1 on the Speed Triple being too much for a newbie.

I started out on a slightly used 1998 Yamaha YZF 600R (only had 2,000 miles on it). Was probably too much bike for me then. Luckily, I didn't hurt myself, but that is probably because I didn't ride it that much. After the YZF, I bought a Kawasaki EX250, which was a blast to ride and very forgiving. I learned a lot riding that little 250 and my riding skills definetly improved. My wife is now learning to ride on the 250 and is loving it. I now have a M900, which has less HP than my original bike, but is so much more fun. So remember, more HP doesn't mean more fun.


Just my $.02....
 

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I was a big dirtbiker my first dirtbike was a yz250 i weighed 85lbs, yea it beat me but i respected it more than an entry level 80 so i feel i wrecked less often. my first street bike was a gsxr 750 (new) my buddies said was way too much and i should get a gixr 600. Think about the difference maybe 1 second in the quarter, still both do 0-60 in around 3-4 seconds. I had no prolbems and wished i started with a litre bike.

The big difference is torque, you could make a mistake with torque on a sporty v twin, but to wheelie and 12oclock a 4 cylinder bike you have to spool it up to 12k that doesnt happen on accident. likewise a 2 cycle bike can get you into trouble as the powerbands are less predictable.

my advise to any new rider. use a dirtbike first get that first few panic rev crashes out of the way. crashing on the dirt hurts and costs less. I feel that i have wrapped myself around enough trees that when in a scary situation on the street I will respond accordingly and not with the new rider gi joe death grip on the throttle.

I also had much trouble deciding speed tripple vs monster, In fact i drove almost 3 hours just to be at a dealer with both in stock. Mr duc won the battle but it was a close one
 

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hackd said:
my advise to any new rider. use a dirtbike first get that first few panic rev crashes out of the way. crashing on the dirt hurts and costs less. I feel that i have wrapped myself around enough trees that when in a scary situation on the street I will respond accordingly and not with the new rider gi joe death grip on the throttle.
+1
 

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Wow!!
I read stuff like this with horror,here in the UK you have to pass a CBT- compulsory basic training before you can even be let loose on the road as a learner,then your restricted to a 125cc bike until you can pass your road test (and a written test now) then your on probation on a restricted 33bhp bike for two years before you can buy that MotoGP bike you always wanted. And all this does is provide the basics of machine control and road etiquette.
Then theres UK insurance,its just not feasible for a young guy to run a superbike unless your really well off.
You guys sound like you just walk into a shop with a bag of money,point out a bike and sayI'll take one in red!! The attrition rate must be huge! :eek:
 

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Bigred916 said:
You guys sound like you just walk into a shop with a bag of money,point out a bike and sayI'll take one in red!! The attrition rate must be huge! :eek:
You're not far off. Many bike shops even have small bikes/scooters that they loan-out so that you can ride an easy bike to gain your motorcycle endorsement. When I originally got my license in Virginia in 1990, I rode my father's Honda CB750K to the DMV (it started to rain enroute). I took and passed the written test and the examiner didn't even watch me perform the riding portion. She just directed me to leave the parking lot, ride a block away, and then ride back. When I pulled out of the lot, I shot a glance her way and saw her go back inside. When I asked her afterwards specifically what she was looking for she said, "Comfort mostly - since you were willing to ride in here in the rain, you'll be fine."

It's pretty scarry when you think about it - not only for the new rider but also for the other road users.

To reinforce the foolishness, when I got my license here in Missouri, they looked at my old Virginia license and automatically transferred-over the motorcycle endorsement without any questions. However, the last time I had rode a motorcycle on the road had been 10 years earlier... on that same rainy day in Virginia.

I've since been more responsible than the DMV requires. I bought a small beat-up cruiser bike, took the MSF course, and rode that beater over the course of a few years before buying my Monster. I did grow-up with dirt-bikes & have MANY MANY MANY off-road miles under my belt, but that was a very long time ago. It makes a difference in comfort & controls, but there is no replacement for progressive on-the-road experience like the UK mandates.
 
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