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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,

I'm a new owner of the 2021 Monster 937. It seems that with the loss of the Trellis frame there is also the loss of the wide aftermarket support (or at least the aftermarket is taking its sweet time developing new products for this bike). This has lead me to search for parts from the older 821 which might also be compatible with this new Monster. Looking through part numbers, I've identified the following parts which may potentially be a direct or close to direct swap between the 821 and 937:

Front mudguard: The official carbon mudguard from Ducati for the 797/821/1200 and 937 have the same part number (96980991A). This would indicate that any aftermarket fenders made for the 797/821/1200 would also be a perfect fit for the 937.

Front wheel: Looking at page 152 of the parts diagram for the M937 and page 126 of the parts diagram for the M821 shows that the front wheels of the 821 and 937 may be interchangeable. The front wheel spindle, left/right spacers, bearings are all the same. The wheel inner spacer is has a slightly different part number (71413321A vs 71413241AA ), but I believe this difference doesn't matter too much since the fork spacing is identical (identical part numbers for front mudguard), and all spacers and spindles are identical as well. Likely a direct swap but others are free to weigh in on this down below as well.

Rear wheel: Looking at page 156 of the parts diagram for the M937 and page 126 of the parts diagram for the M821 shows identical sprocket mounting assemblies between the M821 and M937 (16022491A). Unlike the front wheels however, the bearings have different part numbers, and the part numbers for the inner spacer and various other spacers are different. Interestingly enough, page 119 of the parts diagram for the M797 shows the same inner spacer/bearing part numbers, but the part numbers for the sprocket mounting components are different. It's not clear that any combination of rear wheel parts from older monsters would fit on the 937 without testing the parts.

Rear shock: Looking at page 137 of the parts diagram for the M937 and page 135 of the parts diagram for the M821 shows that the rear shock might be interchangeable between the M821 and M937. The two bikes have identical mounting hardware for their rear shock absorbers (77915041A). The shocks are also visually similar in the diagrams, with the main difference being the 'stepped' preload adjustment on the 937 rear shock compared to the more traditional locknut design of the 821. Coupled with the fact that the two bikes have identical rear suspension travel and likely similar swingarm geometries (821 vs 937), it's likely that shocks for the 821 such as the Ohlins DU506 can also be fitted to the 937 and offer identical/comparable gains in performance.

Rear plate holder: This is a long shot, but between pictures in the parts diagrams (p130 for m937 and p20 for m821) and various aftermarket tail tidies, it does look like the position and spacing of the mounting holes for the two bikes are similar. Whether they are identical or just visually similar wouldn't be possible to tell without parts in hand. Fortunately, there are already a few tail tidy options for the M937 from Evotech (unfortunately sold out as of writing) and R&G racing (also unavailable as of writing) so less of a need to take a gamble on this one.

Obviously I've searched these since I am interested in replacing these items on my bike. I'm curious to see if anybody else has looked into this and if so, what other parts might be interchangeable between these bikes. Any inputs about the items I've identified are welcome as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Someone should bite the bullet and try out the Ohlins rear shock. ;)
Currently saving up for the termis and some lighter wheels and in no rush to upgrade rear shocks. I figure by the time I want to upgrade suspension, Ohlins will have released a M937 specific rear shock already.
 

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So on top of the $13k you spend to buy it stock, you need to invest another 4k to get it right. This new bike looks like a turd and is overpriced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So on top of the $13k you spend to buy it stock, you need to invest another 4k to get it right. This new bike looks like a turd and is overpriced.
To be completely honest, none of the people who bought a M937 care about people like you who dislike it because of the move away from the Trellis frame. At $11,895 MSRP, the new M937 is also slightly less expensive than the outgoing 821 at $11,995. Price of official accessories from Ducati are also comparable and people with old and new Monsters alike will want to spend money on exhaust/wheel/shock/visual upgrades if they could. My purpose of starting this thread was to identify parts from previous Monsters which already exist due to the current lack of aftermarket support for this new model.

Ducati made an engineering decision to drop the trellis frame. This has resulted in the significant 40lb weight saving over the M821, service intervals comparable to Japanese bikes, and the ability to actually engage neutral on the first try. They also made a business decision to market it as a fun, utilitarian bike priced almost identically to the M821 and aimed at a new generation of riders like me who mostly live in urban areas and want something that can do it all and do not care about things like what a monster is "supposed" to be. Obviously, whether or not you choose to follow up and vote with your wallet to reflect Ducati's engineering and business decisions for the M937 depends on your own taste and financial situation, but for me it is perfect.

Holding on to heritage and building bikes that respect tradition is great and all, but it should not come at the expense of engineering progress. If what a bike "should" be is more important for you, then maybe I can suggest selling your Ducati and picking up a Harley instead.
 

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To be completely honest, none of the people who bought a M937 care about people like you who dislike it because of the move away from the Trellis frame. At $11,895 MSRP, the new M937 is also slightly less expensive than the outgoing 821 at $11,995. Price of official accessories from Ducati are also comparable and people with old and new Monsters alike will want to spend money on exhaust/wheel/shock/visual upgrades if they could. My purpose of starting this thread was to identify parts from previous Monsters which already exist due to the current lack of aftermarket support for this new model.

Ducati made an engineering decision to drop the trellis frame. This has resulted in the significant 40lb weight saving over the M821, service intervals comparable to Japanese bikes, and the ability to actually engage neutral on the first try. They also made a business decision to market it as a fun, utilitarian bike priced almost identically to the M821 and aimed at a new generation of riders like me who mostly live in urban areas and want something that can do it all and do not care about things like what a monster is "supposed" to be. Obviously, whether or not you choose to follow up and vote with your wallet to reflect Ducati's engineering and business decisions for the M937 depends on your own taste and financial situation, but for me it is perfect.

Holding on to heritage and building bikes that respect tradition is great and all, but it should not come at the expense of engineering progress. If what a bike "should" be is more important for you, then maybe I can suggest selling your Ducati and picking up a Harley instead.
Easy there, Grasshopper (first bike, right?). I'm open to picking up a M937, but I'm also not crazy about the move away from the trellis frame. I'm an oldtimer with an original Monster that has a complete trellis frame (851/ST2), which is an absolute relic compared to the bolted-to-the-cylinder-head short trellis of the 1200's and 821, for example. As a Ducati superbike owner for the past couple of decades, I generally applaud Ducati's engineering choices, even if I may not necessarily prefer them in the beginning. For the record, I don't think ANY of the trellis frames weigh 40 lbs., so I think your 40lb weight saving from dropping the trellis is way off. I can see maybe 10lbs savings from the change, but the additional 30 is most likely from subframe, swingarm, wheels, motor, etc.

No disrespect, but I'm going to assume that not only are you new to Ducati, but that you are young as well. Even though I'm a dinosaur among mammals, I'm still a gear/tech head at heart. And while engineering progress is of primary importance, don't discount heritage and tradition. Almost 19 years ago, Ducati announced their soon to be available 999 to the general public as a successor to one of the most iconic sportbikes ever. It was ahead of it's time with it's design/look, and while it kept the underseat exhaust (albeit boxily different), it featured a conventional swingarm to save weight. It was a very capable bike that won a couple of world titles yet I don't think it was the showroom floor success it should have been. Many pundits argue that the lack of "traditional' underseat exhaust, SSSA, and nose/lights of the previous generation were a factor (and there are those among Porsche circles that say similar about the 911). Guess what? The successor to the 999 ended up with the return of the SSSA, dual can underseat exhaust, and "traditional" headlights.

Personally, I think the M937 is pretty cool. But I can also see where previous Monster owners might not embrace it with open arms. I think it was very clever of Ducati to build something that will most likely cater to the new generation of Monster owners, but I'm going to guess that there are still more of us older Ducatisti than their are of you newer ones, and a nod to "tradition" wouldn't have hurt. But then again, I like Harleys too, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Easy there, Grasshopper (first bike, right?). I'm open to picking up a M937, but I'm also not crazy about the move away from the trellis frame. I'm an oldtimer with an original Monster that has a complete trellis frame (851/ST2), which is an absolute relic compared to the bolted-to-the-cylinder-head short trellis of the 1200's and 821, for example. As a Ducati superbike owner for the past couple of decades, I generally applaud Ducati's engineering choices, even if I may not necessarily prefer them in the beginning. For the record, I don't think ANY of the trellis frames weigh 40 lbs., so I think your 40lb weight saving from dropping the trellis is way off. I can see maybe 10lbs savings from the change, but the additional 30 is most likely from subframe, swingarm, wheels, motor, etc.

No disrespect, but I'm going to assume that not only are you new to Ducati, but that you are young as well. Even though I'm a dinosaur among mammals, I'm still a gear/tech head at heart. And while engineering progress is of primary importance, don't discount heritage and tradition. Almost 19 years ago, Ducati announced their soon to be available 999 to the general public as a successor to one of the most iconic sportbikes ever. It was ahead of it's time with it's design/look, and while it kept the underseat exhaust (albeit boxily different), it featured a conventional swingarm to save weight. It was a very capable bike that won a couple of world titles yet I don't think it was the showroom floor success it should have been. Many pundits argue that the lack of "traditional' underseat exhaust, SSSA, and nose/lights of the previous generation were a factor (and there are those among Porsche circles that say similar about the 911). Guess what? The successor to the 999 ended up with the return of the SSSA, dual can underseat exhaust, and "traditional" headlights.

Personally, I think the M937 is pretty cool. But I can also see where previous Monster owners might not embrace it with open arms. I think it was very clever of Ducati to build something that will most likely cater to the new generation of Monster owners, but I'm going to guess that there are still more of us older Ducatisti than their are of you newer ones, and a nod to "tradition" wouldn't have hurt. But then again, I like Harleys too, lol.
You bring up good points and I'll admit that as both a new rider and younger person, I have not been around long enough to appreciate heritage and tradition. It probably also doesn't help that I am an engineer myself and tend to value function over form as well. The closest thing I can relate is probably with cars and the move away from NA engines and manual transmissions towards turbos and CVTs in the name of efficiency and the ease in wrestling around in traffic. Sure the new cars with their fancy CVTs and turbos can be objectively better than an old NA manual, but there's a reason why some people will never embrace with open arms (myself included) because the emotional appeal is just not the same. One thing I will say coming over from only been on car forums before is that there seem to be less threads that devolve into a toxic rabbithole and more threads that bring value to others in the community, which is a nice change of pace.

You are also right that only 10lbs of the weight savings came from ditching the trellis. The other weight savings are found throughout the rest of the bike in the engine, rear subframe, wheels, etc. KTM seems to have done very well with keeping weight down while keeping the trellis so only time will tell if Ducati will find a way/reason to bring back the trellis and keep the heritage.
 

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You bring up good points and I'll admit that as both a new rider and younger person, I have not been around long enough to appreciate heritage and tradition. It probably also doesn't help that I am an engineer myself and tend to value function over form as well. The closest thing I can relate is probably with cars and the move away from NA engines and manual transmissions towards turbos and CVTs in the name of efficiency and the ease in wrestling around in traffic. Sure the new cars with their fancy CVTs and turbos can be objectively better than an old NA manual, but there's a reason why some people will never embrace with open arms (myself included) because the emotional appeal is just not the same. One thing I will say coming over from only been on car forums before is that there seem to be less threads that devolve into a toxic rabbithole and more threads that bring value to others in the community, which is a nice change of pace.

You are also right that only 10lbs of the weight savings came from ditching the trellis. The other weight savings are found throughout the rest of the bike in the engine, rear subframe, wheels, etc. KTM seems to have done very well with keeping weight down while keeping the trellis so only time will tell if Ducati will find a way/reason to bring back the trellis and keep the heritage.
And there it is... you mention the one thing that IMO trumps both engineering progress and tradition/heritage: Emotion. CEO Claudio Domenicali started with Ducati when he was one of a very small handful of engineers and now leads an organization that has a few hundred, IIRC. I think his influence from an engineering perspective is more than evident, yet I am very grateful that he has never forgotten the Passion part of Ducati's DNA. Monsters have rarely lacked in the performance department and have always excelled in the area of emotion -- 350,000 units sold prior to the current M937 more than speaks volumes. Those 350k units all had some variation of the trellis frame, BTW ;) No doubt the M937 is the start of a new era of better performing, more efficient, and technologically superior Monsters, the turbocharged CVT era, if you will. However, how much of that emotional appeal they retain remains to be seen. For those new to Ducati/Monster, I suspect this will be largely irrelevant -- the emotional appeal for them will be redefined from their perspective. For the existing "Monstro-isti," on the other hand, I have my popcorn out, waiting to see how this unfolds.

I have an almost unhealthy obsession with weight savings lol and am fortunate enough to have colleagues who are brilliant with materials/material science, so I do have a pretty good idea how and where weight can be dropped from a bike without compromising safety/reliability. Relative to Ducati, KTM is new to using the trellis frame (1980 vs. early 2000's IIRC), so while I applaud KTM for keeping the trellis frame on their road bikes (I formerly owned one of their earlier examples), I don't know if they will be able to "never give up on steel trellis frame in MotoGP" despite what their CEO says, at least not if they plan on winning a championship. BTW, KTM isn't the only one that can keep the weight down while retaining the trellis. Ducati could easily do the same, if not better. My 2008 Ducati was more than 20lbs. lighter than my 2010 KTM (both trellis, same era) -- in fact, the curb weight of my 13 year old trellis-framed Ducati (in stock trim) is less than 10 lbs. more than the curb weight of a stock M937.

In the end, it's going to be about that emotional tug, that intangible that is different for each person. Back on topic, be patient, the aftermarket will start introducing more and more tasty/go fast/head turner bits in the near future, barring supply chain issues. Compatible wheels, for example, are irrelevant for the most part if the older wheels are heavier than what you currently have.
 
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