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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just purchased a brand new Monster 796 (no ABS) and was wondering if this is norm...

When I put the bike into 1st gear and slowly release the clutch the bike shakes/jerks slightly in back and forth motion as im going forward releasing the clutch. Even when the clutch is fully released in first gear it doesnt feel like its 100% smooth. It has this bumpy/jerking feel like its skipping beats or something.

It's difficult to explain but if it's the norm you should understand what I mean. It only feels 100% smooth and non jerky once I reach 3rd gear.

It's not terrible, just slightly annoying since it's not 100% smooth like it feels in 3rd gear. I just want to be sure the bike was assembled safely and properly by the dealer and that this is norm.
 

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I did not feel that on my test ride. Back and forth meaning front to back or side to side? Front to back can often happen as you are getting used to the clutch action (on a dry clutch it would be easy to relate was you are feeling to your clutch action). If you are completely off the clutch, it can be jerky when it's cold or if you are hard on and off the throttle at mid to high RPMs. If you have fewer than 200-300 miles, I'd wait a bit longer or until your first service to see if it smooths out.

If you are wiggling (side to side), that is not normal and I would take it in now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did not feel that on my test ride. Back and forth meaning front to back or side to side? Front to back can often happen as you are getting used to the clutch action (on a dry clutch it would be easy to relate was you are feeling to your clutch action). If you are completely off the clutch, it can be jerky when it's cold or if you are hard on and off the throttle at mid to high RPMs. If you have fewer than 200-300 miles, I'd wait a bit longer or until your first service to see if it smooths out.

If you are wiggling (side to side), that is not normal and I would take it in now.
I should have elaborated front to back. I would think it's the clutch action however I feel it even after the clutch is fully released and in 2nd gear too. The weather is really hot (90+ degrees). RPMs are aprox 2-5 at most. The bike currently has 18 miles on it so I guess I will wait it out.

Is there a certain period of time you would recommend waiting between cranking up the bike until it goes into first gear? I typically crank it up and put it into first gear and on my way 20 seconds later.
 

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There is a debate on wait times on this forum somewhere, with most people saying about 60 seconds or so in warm weather (if the bike is not already warm from prior riding) and a bit longer in cold. There were a few that said not to wait at all, which is, well, not advised.

I did ask my shop specifically about the 796 with the auto choke. All the mechanics seem to agree that you should wait until the bike automatically begins to rev down, which is an indicator that the oil has been properly dispersed. I don't have my 796 yet, so I don't know how long that is or whether it makes sense.

On my 750, I usually did 60 seconds min on warm days and on colder ones, I could tell by the engine feel as I closed the choke. If the bike felt too jerky or like it was going to die, I knew I took off too soon. I also never cranked on the throttle for at least a few minutes of normal riding.

Riders all seem to have their own opinion and it's always seems like the owners of Japanese bikes that say they don't wait at all, although I followed the same rules on my Suzuki. Lastly, someone said you save gas by not waiting at all. The opposite is actually true (same with cars).

If you get too much conflicting info, just ask your shop ;)

Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
There is a debate on wait times on this forum somewhere, with most people saying about 60 seconds or so in warm weather (if the bike is not already warm from prior riding) and a bit longer in cold. There were a few that said not to wait at all, which is, well, not advised.

I did ask my shop specifically about the 796 with the auto choke. All the mechanics seem to agree that you should wait until the bike automatically begins to rev down, which is an indicator that the oil has been properly dispersed. I don't have my 796 yet, so I don't know how long that is or whether it makes sense.

On my 750, I usually did 60 seconds min on warm days and on colder ones, I could tell by the engine feel as I closed the choke. If the bike felt too jerky or like it was going to die, I knew I took off too soon. I also never cranked on the throttle for at least a few minutes of normal riding.

Riders all seem to have their own opinion and it's always seems like the owners of Japanese bikes that say they don't wait at all, although I followed the same rules on my Suzuki. Lastly, someone said you save gas by not waiting at all. The opposite is actually true (same with cars).

If you get too much conflicting info, just ask your shop ;)

Have fun!
Great info. What your saying makes complete sense. I'm a fairly new Ducati rider. With my ADHD trouble that throttle was too tempting not to take off with immediately. I need to calm down for a few minutes and take your advice. It makes sense the throttle and 60 second wait until the engine settles in should do the trick.

I will post updates and let you know how that works out. The info is greatly appreciated :)

On a separate note what anti-theft devices would you recommend for this bike? I was thinking GPS tracking and automatic engine kill but then I hear these thieves have covers they throw over the bike that blocks the GPS signals.

I live in a safe area but all it takes is one wrong set of eyes on this sexy monster and it's gone. Do I just let insurance do it's thing and not worry about anti-theft gadgets or chains? Curious to hear some opinions on this...
 

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If you're used to a four, the twin will feel a bit jerky (although also more powerful/torquey) at low revs. Instead of four evenly spaced power pulses every two revolutions, it has two unevenly spaced ones.

I have always started out from cold almost right away, just a few seconds for the oil to travel to the head. But I don't give it much gas / high revs until I've been on my way for a couple minutes at least, the choke is off, and it's running smoothly. This does not seem to have adversely affected my bike's longevity.

Best theft protection is good old-fashioned cover and sturdy lock. Next would be something like Lo-Jack, which while it isn't foolproof/guaranteed, it works pretty well. Third is comprehensive insurance.

PhilB
 

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Having lived in Chicago, New York, Charlotte and San Francisco (and having been a Chicago Police Officer), I can tell you that theft protection is, for the most part, useless. If they want your bike in particular, there is nothing you can do about it.

That said, the built in anti-theft immobilizer device (along with the blinking light on the dash), is already a deterrant over bikes nearby that do not have the same protection.

All the locks can be clipped (yes, even the big ones) and the alarms are useless unless you are looking for it. How many times have you heard an alarm at night and simply closed your window or ignored it? How many times have you seen a person messing with a car with the alarm going off and figured it was the owner (unless you saw a tool in use, e.g. a crowbar or slim-jim)?

A thief with a truck can clip a lock and pop it in the truck (with the alarm still going) very fast. In many cases, if it is just a disc lock, they will take the whole bike (with the lock) and use a circular saw to cut it off later). If they have a van, the alarm becomes less of an issue. If they are good, they will clip and disable the alarm really fast (unlike a car, bike alarms are much easier to get to and all are very similar in design).

Your best bet? Park in places that are commonly travelled and under lights, use a garage (if applicable to where you live) and be smart about where you leave your bike. Have insurance from a good company and you'll only owe the deductible for a replacement. If you have comprehensive coverage, they will also replace your custom parts, helmet and anything else they took, as long as you get a police report.

By all means, if a lock makes you feel better, go for it. If your bike is parked next to an equally valuable bike and yours has a lock and the other doesn't, they will likely go for the unlocked bike.

My humble 2 cents (which in today's world, is probably less than 1 cent ;) ).

Just enjoy your bike. If it gets taken, it's just a bike and you'll get it replaced...

P.S. I think you bigger risk is parking the bike on the street and it getting clipped by a passing car or hit by a terrible parallel parker. It happens all the time. You come back to your bike laying on its side :( - Sometimes its not worth fitting between two cars to save meter change.... or parking near a corner (where cars turn to tight) just to be closer to your destination...

Luckily, because there are few Ducatis in any one area, particulary for specific models, they are less in demand as a bike to steal because they are more easliy spotted by officers. Although folks think it is the high profile bikes that get stolen, more often it is the more common bikes that get taken (I think the Honda CBR was the #1 for many years, if I recall correctly). For example, in CA, if there are only 30 796's across the state, it is much more risky to try to steal and sell the bike (and the parts have limited value for the same reason) whereas a common bike can be sold or broken down for parts and easy distributed. Ducati's do not fall into that category and do not have the value to make them worth shipping to far...

BTW - Covers can be a two way street, they can hide the bike, but many thieves assume a cover means something valuble and curiousity forces them to look. As an officer, we use to laugh about lo-jack owners because our common response was, "after being beat on for the chase, or days, or even wrecked, who would want it back?" If it's not totalled, the insurance company will force you to fix it and take it back and even if it is not wrecked, it's been ridden, probably wrecklessly and at cut-off revs by someone, and if in a chase, hit curbs headon, bumps, etc...

Again, my humble opinion, others have had success with various methods and even if they only give you mental comfort, then they are worth the bucks. :) And for some, like Philb, they may work perfectly and I could be off base for certain areas and such (I respect everyone's opinion, that's what forums are all about!).
 

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... Again, my humble opinion, others have had success with various methods and even if they only give you mental comfort, then they are worth the bucks. :) And for some, like Philb, they may work perfectly and I could be off base for certain areas and such (I respect everyone's opinion, that's what forums are all about!).
I didn't say I used all those things. Indeed, I don't use any of them. I park my bike outside, don't lock it beyond the ignition/steering lock, don't have an alarm or Lojack, and don't have insurance beyond required liability. MY best defense is that my bike has 185,000 miles on it, gets parked outside all the time, and damn well looks like it.

But if you are concerned about theft, there are really two kinds of thieves. There's the amateur joyrider / punk kid, who can be deterred pretty easily by simple methods like a cover and lock and/or alarm. And there's the pro, who will take your bike if he wants it. Simple deterrents can still be of some use, if it makes him think he can find an easier one, but your only *real* defense against a pro is not to have what he wants. This is where having something strange or old or otherwise hard to fence is your best bet.

But really, bike theft, while real, isn't that huge a risk in this country. It's a lot worse in Britain, and in lots of third-world-type countries. Here, it happens, but I don't see it as being such a problem that we should let it dictate our choices and actions. Buy what you want to ride, take basic precautions to reduce the chances some, get theft insurance if you can't take the hit if it goes missing (and if the insurance isn't even more then the risk). And enjoy your bike.

PhilB
 

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I agree with Philb on all points. So there you have it ;)

Just enjoy :)
 

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Some long threads so haven't read them all, sorry if it's already been said. When you first start the bike you should wait for 2 bars on the temp gauge before riding of, in cold weather this can take 5-10 mins in hot 5 mins approx. If you stop for a long period of time , when you restart the bike you should wait for 2 bars again, Ducati make this very clear for performance and engine longevity. As to the strange back and forth issue, this should not happen and did not happen on my new 796. At most there should be a slight surge in 1st/2nd which slowly disapears as you run the bike in. I find that Ducatis like a quick clutch action and don't respond that well to dragging the clutch.
 

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I have same symptoms

I also own a non-ABS 796. The jerking effect is due to combination of cold start and dragging the clutch. Follow the advice in this thread on letting the bike warm up and, then, make smoother shifts. Bump up the revs a little so you don't lug the engine, release that clutch and the jerking almost disappears. I don't think the slight jerking will damage anything long term.
 

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Hello, very new rider here(streetwise), I also just got the 796(non ABS), normal normal, what you are describing. The things my sales man stressed before I left the show room, warm the bike up to 2 bars, don't drag the brakes or hard stopping for the first little while(he said on and off and down shift), and he said it doesn't like being below 4000RPM. 4000RPM for myself is about the speed limit here(50-55km/hr). Enjoy your new ride and this my take on smoothing out, ease into the gas on or off and it is a smooth ride. When i do slow stuff around the parking lot, I don't fully release the clutch, I just feed it to get enough momentum. Oh, your rear brake will start making noise if it hasn't already.
 

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From an article on the 796 found here:
http://www.ashonbikes.com/content/ducati-monster-796-review

It’s not blastingly quick but it does feel alive and responsive, which makes the glitch in its urban manners stand out more than maybe on some other bikes. Most of the time it responds sweetly, but at low revs in low gears around town the power snaps in too suddenly, causing the bike to jerk forward when you’re trying to trickle and ease your way through traffic.
That’s the main complaint and it shouldn’t be enough to put you off the bike, but it’s rare for a Ducati to do this, most have set the standards for fuelling right back to the 851 Superbike. The motor is heaving with character anyway, shuddering when you open the throttle, vocal as any bike engine and generally a real pleasure to use, although some riders will be irritated by the same general lumpy feel that endears it to others.
This sounds similar to the shudddering and jerkiness you are reporting and what I have read a couple times from others. I'm in the market for a first bike (I'm a 44 y/o) trying to decide between the M796 and the Striple. I really want the Ducati but I keep reading about the smoothness of the Striple and how great that engine is. Is the shuddering that much of an issue? Because I plan on using it primarally for use in town and I anticipate lots of stops and starts and some slow speed traffic. Or do I dismiss it as part of the character of the bike?
I probably wouldnt go wrong with either bike, but I don't want to have regrets either.
 

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From an article on the 796 found here:
http://www.ashonbikes.com/content/ducati-monster-796-review

This sounds similar to the shudddering and jerkiness you are reporting and what I have read a couple times from others. I'm in the market for a first bike (I'm a 44 y/o) trying to decide between the M796 and the Striple. I really want the Ducati but I keep reading about the smoothness of the Striple and how great that engine is. Is the shuddering that much of an issue? Because I plan on using it primarally for use in town and I anticipate lots of stops and starts and some slow speed traffic. Or do I dismiss it as part of the character of the bike?
I really don't think it's a big deal. I certainly think that the advantage of the torque of the twin vs. a triple or four outweighs the slight unevenness. But you'd really need to take a testride and see, making sure to include some slow city riding to find out for yourself.

PhilB
 

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My 796 does the same, my 620 used to do it a bit too when not warmed up much.

I think its just taking time to get used to the clutch action, which will probably involve a bit of stalling initially!! I definitely slip the clutch a lot more in 1st and 2nd than I did on my old 620, and I find myself staying in 1st much longer before changing up.

And my rear brake is doing some nice squealing now too... all to look forward to! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
From an article on the 796 found here:
http://www.ashonbikes.com/content/ducati-monster-796-review



This sounds similar to the shudddering and jerkiness you are reporting and what I have read a couple times from others. I'm in the market for a first bike (I'm a 44 y/o) trying to decide between the M796 and the Striple. I really want the Ducati but I keep reading about the smoothness of the Striple and how great that engine is. Is the shuddering that much of an issue? Because I plan on using it primarally for use in town and I anticipate lots of stops and starts and some slow speed traffic. Or do I dismiss it as part of the character of the bike?
I probably wouldnt go wrong with either bike, but I don't want to have regrets either.
When I first reported this issue it was a bit worse than it is now. Things have gotten a bit smoother. I would let the bike warm up first a bit as per 'TheFirf's' and others advice. The problem wasn't a killer problem for me enough to even think about regretting the Monster 796. I am very glad I made this choice and the bike is an incredible bike. I don't think I would be as happy with anything else. This model fixed up a lot of reported issues the 696 and 1100 had according to my reading... This M796 is pure perfection! (fingers crossed)
 

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Also... I'm a bit weary of the Speed Triple reviews as most of the awesome reviews are from british websites and magazines (big surprise). The 796 definitely corners better (even the british mags can't get around that), and smoothness can be very subjective and none of the tests seem to be on long term bikes (many are tested with very few miles on them and others are tested with miles, but those are test miles (no real world break in)). I personally like the side view of the triple, but never got over the headlights look.... Must also be a British thing ;).

Also, the 796 will serve you well for urban rides... If I was really focused only on smoothness, I would have gone with a BMW bike. But dice owning my first Duc, can't see riding anything else. It has a special feel, different than British and Japanese bikes. Ithink that goes for the look too.

In any case, very subjective...
 
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