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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I just purchased a 2015 Monster 1200s and was wondering what special tools the 1200 veterans have found to be necessary? I have a solid collection of standard tooling, so I’m referring more to the items that would be more model specific. So far, this is what I know of:

-Spanner for chain adjustment
-rear axle nut
-single sided swingarm stand

I’m sure there are a few other bits. What do you guys recommend. If you have a favorite source for Ducati/motorcycle tools/parts, maybe share that too. It’s been a while since I’ve owned a Duc.
 

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If you have rear wheel tip over protectors, I have Speedy Moto, you can use them as spools to lift the rear with a standard stand. You can then lube and adjust the chain, but of course not get off the wheel.
 

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If you have rear wheel tip over protectors, I have Speedy Moto, you can use them as spools to lift the rear with a standard stand. You can then lube and adjust the chain, but of course not get off the wheel.
Perhaps a dumb question, but why not simply get a proper SSSA stand?
 

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Put this on the advanced tool kit list...I've used a homemade version but if your investing in the future there is no substitute in it's speed and convenience

Ducati tool :88765.1623
 

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I did.

But to lube the chain it's easier to use the regular stand, no need to take the protector off.
And I already had one when I got this bike.
I'm lightly cleaning the chain whenever I lube it. The additional 5 minutes it takes to remove/replace spindle sliders is negligible to me. A good SSSA stand is easier to use/align when solo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So I’ll add the two c spanners to the short term list and the cam holding tool for the long term. I’ll probably just get a single sided swing arm stand for the bike too.
 

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Hi everyone, I just purchased a 2015 Monster 1200s and was wondering what special tools the 1200 veterans have found to be necessary? I have a solid collection of standard tooling, so I’m referring more to the items that would be more model specific. So far, this is what I know of:

-Spanner for chain adjustment
-rear axle nut
-single sided swingarm stand

I’m sure there are a few other bits. What do you guys recommend. If you have a favorite source for Ducati/motorcycle tools/parts, maybe share that too. It’s been a while since I’ve owned a Duc.
Those absolutely.
I would add the following hardware:

55mm / 30mm sprocket tool for front and back wheels
A front stand for cleaning and tire changes
A breaker bar or impact wrench
A small and large torque wrench
A set of long hex keys ( the ones with a T handle)
A work-light
A floor cleaning knee-pad


Consumables:

Your favorite cleaners and wax
Painters tape (and bungees) for front wheel removal
Axle grease
Spare oil
Blue lock-tight
Micro fiber rags

IMG_20170509_163251.jpg 20200813_083221.jpg 20200512_152708-1.jpg
 

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I tucked a small black envelope with $50 in it, on top the tool kit, under the seat.
So, even if I lose my wallet.........

There is nothing quite as wonderful as money.
There is nothing quite as beautiful as cash. :p
 

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+1 on the blue loctite...also a tub of molybdenum grease...nothing will ever seize tight on you again...brake caliper bolts...axels...swing arm...stuffs great...and in the anticipation of any internal work...a tube of 3 bond is a necessity... Ducati brand is the way to go...it's thick like paste and if capped it will last a year or two...other brands will outlast it on the shelf but are considerably more runny... finally a thread restorer kit is a worthy investment...I chase every hole to clean out the loctite residue as well as remove the crud from the bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks again for the suggestions guys. I have a pretty good set of general tools, I was mainly referring to specialty tooling. I have a few Snap-on torque wrenches (thanks eBay), short long and ball end hex/Allen keys and a lot of the other standard stuff. I’ll be picking up the rear stand this evening and have been adding the other stuff to my “Cart” on a few different websites to see which one will be the best option. Motowheels is looking pretty good right now.
I’m not really a fan of “Cleaning out the holes” unless it’s necessary. Each time you do that, you are taking away more of the “Locking feature” that creates drag torque, which helps keep a bolt from backing out. I AM a big fan of molybdenum grease though. Especially depending on your climate, it can be a lifesaver! I may need to stash some cash too. I have a wallet case for my phone, so if I lose one, I lose both my method of communication and my money! A backup would be a good idea.
 

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There not cutters...they're cleaners...you can wind them in by hand if the hole is clean...if you spent good money on a torque wrench you should be equally invested in seeing that it's setup for success

And on another note...brass brushes do wonders cleaning things without scratching aluminum...I go through them by the dozen
 

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I have a few Snap-on torque wrenches (thanks eBay)
Considering the source, you may want to give them to your local Snap-On guy to have them recalibrated. In fact, depending on usage, it's a good idea to do this routinely (5-7k cycles IIRC).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Considering the source, you may want to give them to your local Snap-On guy to have them recalibrated. In fact, depending on usage, it's a good idea to do this routinely (5-7k cycles IIRC).
I have calibrated torque wrenches at work that I check them against. One was brand new when I bought it. The other one is definitely older and I’ll probably take it to get recalibrated soon.

Thank you for the suggestions.
 

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I may need to stash some cash too. I have a wallet case for my phone, so if I lose one, I lose both my method of communication and my money! A backup would be a good idea.
Yes, good idea. I like to keep them separated. Cue Offspring video tune.

Wallet in pocket on me, phone goes in my bag in the top case with hydration, snack, vape, other junk,
and cash under the seat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So to follow up, I ended up ordering the following items after all the suggestions:

-SpeedyMoto 55mm Large Hub Socket
  • (2) Ohlins Spanner wrenches
  • Coarse Dynamics “Non-slip” eccentric chain tool
-Pit Bull single sided Swingarm stand.

I haven’t purchased a front stand as I will probably suspend the bike with straps using my squat rack any time I need the front wheel off. And honestly I don’t really like the designs I have seen. The Pit Bull one looks okay, but I think having the bike suspended on straps leaves less chance for it to get knocked over.
I looked and I have a 30mm socket in my toolbox already, but it’s a 12pt. I may find a good 30mm shallow impact socket to use on it instead. I ended up ordering from MotoWheels as they had everything I needed, other than the front socket.
 

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So to follow up, I ended up ordering the following items after all the suggestions:

-SpeedyMoto 55mm Large Hub Socket
  • (2) Ohlins Spanner wrenches
  • Coarse Dynamics “Non-slip” eccentric chain tool
-Pit Bull single sided Swingarm stand.

I haven’t purchased a front stand as I will probably suspend the bike with straps using my squat rack any time I need the front wheel off. And honestly I don’t really like the designs I have seen. The Pit Bull one looks okay, but I think having the bike suspended on straps leaves less chance for it to get knocked over.
I looked and I have a 30mm socket in my toolbox already, but it’s a 12pt. I may find a good 30mm shallow impact socket to use on it instead. I ended up ordering from MotoWheels as they had everything I needed, other than the front socket.
Pitbull's Hybrid Forklift Stand accommodates a converter that will allow you to lift the bike from the steering stem:


I use the forklift stand for tire warmers, quick checks, etc, but use a steering stem stand for general maintenance (will allow you to remove forks). If you hit the bike hard enough to knock it off the steering stem stand, you likely have bigger issues lol. If you have no use for a forklift stand, Ducati used to offer a front crank stand which was made by FG (Gubellini), IIRC:



Fast by Ferracci has a great price on these:
This is what I typically use on my M900 (custom Attack Racing triple clamps), for 20 years or so now, and it has proven to be quite stable.

Ducati included a special stand with my Pani that fits under the caliper mounts of modern Ohlins forks. It holds the front end up with less chance of slippage than the Pitbull Forklift Stand, and this might be an option for you (I imagine it is available at Ducati dealers). But I don't think it will support the same weight as the Pitbull as the lifting pins are made of delrin (I think).

If you want a stand that will support the entire bike and allow you to wheel it around the garage while working on it, I believe Bursig makes a mounting plate for the 1200 for use with their stand.


Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Pitbull's Hybrid Forklift Stand accommodates a converter that will allow you to lift the bike from the steering stem:


I use the forklift stand for tire warmers, quick checks, etc, but use a steering stem stand for general maintenance (will allow you to remove forks). If you hit the bike hard enough to knock it off the steering stem stand, you likely have bigger issues lol. If you have no use for a forklift stand, Ducati used to offer a front crank stand which was made by FG (Gubellini), IIRC:



Fast by Ferracci has a great price on these:
This is what I typically use on my M900 (custom Attack Racing triple clamps), for 20 years or so now, and it has proven to be quite stable.

Ducati included a special stand with my Pani that fits under the caliper mounts of modern Ohlins forks. It holds the front end up with less chance of slippage than the Pitbull Forklift Stand, and this might be an option for you (I imagine it is available at Ducati dealers). But I don't think it will support the same weight as the Pitbull as the lifting pins are made of delrin (I think).

If you want a stand that will support the entire bike and allow you to wheel it around the garage while working on it, I believe Bursig makes a mounting plate for the 1200 for use with their stand.


Hope this helps.
Thanks for all the detailed info Terminator. Definitely a lot more options out there than I knew about. When I figure out which one I choose I will update this post.
 
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