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When checking my oil level there is a white milky substance that can be seen through the oil sight glass after the bike is shut down. Is that normal in any way or has a cow been humping my duc?

Dan :eek:
 

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Um, I dunno how they do it in your neck of the woods, but around here 'humping' isnt how you get milk out of a cow. :eek:
You might be confused with a bull, in which case, that is Not Milk.

your oil problem is normal.
its condensation, going on a longer ride where your oil can heat up more will clear it up.
Or you can replace the smog/venting stuff with a K&N crankcase filter, that does it too.
 
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Normally a white milky substance in your oil is evidence of water getting into your oil system. Since your 900 is air cooled that isn't possible. My best guess would be that there is some air/condensation present which, when mixed with some of the hot oil mist being sprayed about, presents itself as white, milky, or cloudy. I would recommend draining the oil just to be sure. If it truly is contaminated to any degree it will all come out white/milky - but I doubt you have anything to worry about.
 

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Jeff's right. It is common in Monsters, especially in cooler weather. Start it up and ride it a while and it'll be gone. Lube your chain instead of worrying about it.
 
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Jeff's right. It is common in Monsters, especially in cooler weather. Start it up and ride it a while and it'll be gone. Lube your chain instead of worrying about it.

You mean your supposed to lube those things!? ;D
 
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when your cow gets done send him/her over, my bike gets lonely sitting out in the shed all night.
 

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Depending on what type of oil you have, the milkiness might not go away by just getting the engine good and warm.

Switching to a semisenthetic oil (Castrol Syntec) cured the problem in my bike. It wouldn't go away with just a non-senthetic oil.
 

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I have fabricated a simple oil cooler cover to use when riding in cooler weather. Without it, the bike never gets up to temp sufficiently to boil the water off (old bike, no temp gauge, just estimating).

I made mine from Aluminum roofing flashing. Tin snips and a woodworking vice to bend the thing.

Others use Aluminum foil. That's easier to stuff in your pocket if it warms up, but I kept losing mine. It'd blow off at speed.

I'll use the cover for any ride during which I expect temps to be in the 30's to mid 40's. If it's below 30, I'm not likely to be out much :(
 

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Had the same problem(?) with my bike when I first got it. The tech said it was related to the oil the factory uses. It went away after the first oil change with full synthetic and hasn't reoccurred. Like Michael Moore said, it's probably temperature related. Go ride!!!
 

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Yep it is just moisture trapped in the cases. The problem is that if you do not burn it off you can possibly cause damage to the internal parts. Most likely this is more theory that reality. If you get it up to operating temp most of the time you should be fine... Have you eliminated the emissions stuff yet? If not order up a K&N crankcase filter and let things breath a little better.
 
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