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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I graduate college in May and start work right afterwards and will be making much more money than I am now. So I've been thinking about upgrading. I am mostly satisfied with my M900 and have considered keeping it, but adding on an upgraded suspension (front and rear). But another option is getting a M1000. I just had a few comparative questions:

1. What is the noticable power difference between the two?

2. Noticable weight difference (handling)?

3. Is it true that the M1000 tends to come with better suspension and brakes?

4. What is a ballpark price range for a good condition bike with around 10k miles or less (I know it depends on a lot of things, but just give me a ballpark.)

5. Is there much difference in maintanence cost/time spent?

Thanks a lot guys!
 

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Keep your 900 if it's fuel injected. I've switched back and forth with Michael Moore and spent some time on his fuel injected 900 v. my m1000 (not an s2r 1000). The 1000 has more grunt, but it's not enough to buy a whole new bike. If there is a weight difference, I didn't notice. OTOH, Michael's Ohlins rear shock and revalved front is AWESOME. Compared to mostrobelle's out-of-tune and old (1994) carbed 900? Spend the $ on the 1000.

The brakes should be the same. The suspension depends on what model 900 you have. Maintenance should be around the same ('cept for you have to buy 4 spark plugs instead of 2).

I wouldn't move up unless you want the S2r1000 with the newer s*r styling, the lighter wheels and better ground clearance. Take what you'd spend and get some suspension on your 900 (and gearing) and get some track time. [thumbsup]
 

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Well, I've got a now high-mileage 900, and have ridden a friend's 1000, so I guess I can offer an opinion. First off the 1000 motor is lovely; smooth as silk compared to the 900. Where the 900 motor is all lumpy and grunty and rough, the 1000 motor is just fast and smooth. Now, being a twisted sort, I like the lumpiness and noise of the 900, but it isn't for everyone.

Good suspension is key, and I think was the best money I ever spent on my monster. If you get an S model it'll have good, adjustable components. If you have the non-adjustable stuff then you're looking at something like Racetech valves and springs for the front, and maybe a shock re-spring or Ohlins replacement for the rear. You can definitely upgrade this way to get a superbly handling bike; the question is whether you want to sink the $$ into your existing ride. (You should pretty much assume any money you spend on upgrades won't be recouped at sale.) Now think about all the little things you may have 'fixed' on your current bike that would need to be done to a new one (exhaust, bars, bling, etc.) and add those to the cost of a new 1000.

Short of getting an S4Rs with Ohlins front and rear, you can probably set up an old 900 with suspension that's equal to or better than a new 1000 for less than the difference in cost of a new bike.

I hope that answers your question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks a lot for the info guys.... pretty much what I was expecting. Although my situation makes the decision very close. It is a carbed 900 and as far as I know it is NOT the S model, although I KNOW it has the adjustable showa forks (Showa rear as well). So if I don't buy a M1000 I will certainly be upgrading the rear at least to Ohlins or Penske. As far as money spent on mods on my 900, almost all of it has been <$25 DIY mods (other than exhaust and clutch slave). So I'm not really worried about losing money in that regard. Probably the biggest reason I am considering the 1000 is that it seems to be a more "complete" bike. It has the suspension I want and the power and torque I want. That means much less engineering on my part. I have ALWAYS been a big fan of starting with a car/bike that is close to the performace you want. Extensive modification to the powertrain/suspension means huge time/money commitments and compromised life of the vehicle, IMO.

Also, I am not interested in the S2R 1000 because of personal preference. The light wheels are the only thing I am drawn to. Otherwise I like the styling of the DSS.
 

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More subtlety:

If you have the adjustable Showa forks, it is most likely an S model. Does it have an Al swinger with spools? If so, that would further reinforce the S-ness.

What year is it?

If it's not an S and it's a 97-99 (I think those are the years) it will have the small valves and 750 cams. In that case, it's the "anemic" 900 and you actually will see a pretty substantial power diff going to the 1K. If it's an older 900 or an S model, it will have the big valves and higher lift cams. A good carbed 900 in that config is good for about 73 HP at the rear wheel. The 1K will give you a good 80. The small valve 900 is down in the high 60s.

Making sure the forks are sprung correctly for you and upgrading to RaceTech Gold Valves is all you need with your adjustable forks. Concur with the Ohlins or Penske upgrade in the rear. Again, make sure the spring's right for you.

Going to a 1K is no assurance that the suspension is sprung correctly for your weight. All these bikes are sprung too light for the average American male rider. They all benefit from Gold Valves as well. So the difference here is in your weight, not in the model of bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
CRASH! said:
More subtlety:

If you have the adjustable Showa forks, it is most likely an S model. Does it have an Al swinger with spools? If so, that would further reinforce the S-ness.

What year is it?

If it's not an S and it's a 97-99 (I think those are the years) it will have the small valves and 750 cams. In that case, it's the "anemic" 900 and you actually will see a pretty substantial power diff going to the 1K. If it's an older 900 or an S model, it will have the big valves and higher lift cams. A good carbed 900 in that config is good for about 73 HP at the rear wheel. The 1K will give you a good 80. The small valve 900 is down in the high 60s.

Making sure the forks are sprung correctly for you and upgrading to RaceTech Gold Valves is all you need with your adjustable forks. Concur with the Ohlins or Penske upgrade in the rear. Again, make sure the spring's right for you.

Going to a 1K is no assurance that the suspension is sprung correctly for your weight. All these bikes are sprung too light for the average American male rider. They all benefit from Gold Valves as well. So the difference here is in your weight, not in the model of bike.
Yes it does have an alum swingarm with the spools. I guess the PO didn't know or didn't mention it. You'd think he would know since he bought it new and if he knew, you think he'd advertise it. Oh well, better for me.

As far as adjusting the suspension I've set the ride height in the rear (I only weigh about 120lbs) and fiddled with the front adjustments. First thing I did was to raise the forks some (drop the triples down the tubes) to get it to a point which seemed a good balance between stability and steering responsiveness.

Truthfully adjusting and modifying suspension has always daunted me. I am pretty mechanically inclined and like to think I am quite aware of how the bike is responding, but it all seems too much of an art and not enough of a science for me. (I'm a math major... very scientifically minded). I would certainly like to replace the valves on the forks and try some different weights in oil too. I've rebuilt one set of dirtbike forks and multiple air and oil mtn bike forks. How much more difficult will the Showas be? How many hours should I expect to put into this?

Thanks a lot for the help guys! I think I'll stay with the 900 for a while longer. It'd be awfully hard to let her go, even for another duc.
 

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AT 120 lbs, the bike won't be undersprung ;D Could even be oversprung. RaceTech has a great calculator online.... but it's wrong for the rear shock. Fork rates are good AFAIK.

Gold Valves will make the forks more supple. The stock valves simply can't flow enough oil to deal with high frequency shocks (sharp pavement edges and such).

I'm mechanically minded too (though I'm an EE) and I feel the same way as you do about suspensions. I'm learning though. As for the fork upgrade, it's like a lot of things; not inherently complicated but made more difficult without the right tools. I paid to have mine done :-\
 
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