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Counter-steering .............. absolutely fantastic. Greatest thing I ever learned. No more trying to wrestle the bike round bends just a nice smooth action....slow in, fast out. No real need for weight shift either.
 

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First time poster, here's something I learned yesterday.

Semi trailers cut corners and do it progressively. If you're on the inside corner, with a semi coming the opposite way on an outside corner, pretend you only have half your lane. And take it slower than you usually would.

On a similar note; their wheels are big and scary. Don't look at the wheels.


Rider behind me closed his visor, thought he was going to have bits of gore flying at him :x
 

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Tell your loved ones that you love them. Often.
Before you leave on EVERY outing, kiss your wife and kids like you will never see them again. Have a good life insurance policy in case you don't.

Grass clippings are another road hazard that is all around during the riding season, especially on Sat/Sun.

Look through the turn and trust your bike/tires. Then slow down for the next ones...If you are still struggling with this one you're not fast anyway. Don't be a poser. We can all tell you can't really ride it.
 

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Great thread!
It's amazing how a routine commute or extensive riding in familiar areas can sometimes dull your awareness of unexpected situations.

1) Always assume you're invisible.
2) When taking a passenger for the first time, always fill them in on what you expect from them, regardless of whether they've ridden with others before... (even if it's just "Sit down, shut up, hold tight"... let them know.)
3) Never rely on other people's common sense. There are still plenty of cagers out there that believe motorcycles shouldn't be on the road, and if we get hurt it's because we "had it coming"... even if it's their fault.
4) The bigger vehicle gets the right of way - common ignorant cager misconception regarding their behavior with other cagers, but for our sake, let's play by their rules and not let their ignorance be our funeral.
5) Bar hopping while riding is a bad idea. Stay sharp, your lives can depend on it. I can show you a couple of friend's gravestones as examples.
6) In a safely manner, predict and practice less-comfortable riding situations. Avoiding road debris/potholes at different speeds and weather conditions, short-stopping in dry/wet pavement, etc.
It's best to not let the first time you execute these maneuvers be the time when failure isn't optional.
7) Know your limitations.

"Tell your loved ones that you love them. Often." +1

Many thanks to all that shared into this thread throughout the years, it is appreciated.
 

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only been riding for 3 weeks and i try to follow the advise that are posted here.. Although one thing i would put in is to not rely on your mirrors... I do check and look in my mirror often but i don't completely rely on them... almost found out the hard way that blind spots exist for everyone on the road
 

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Wear bright gear, and if it's fading, get a new set! I see more riders here with orange vests, which are required per the Post Commander, which are faded to uselessness.

Don't expect anyone to do the right thing. Sad but true. If it's to their benefit, screw the other guy. While riding into work on the wife's Spyder, I was stopped in the right left-turn lane. A rider on a Harley was in front of me, to the left, same lane. A very important lady decided she couldn't wait in line like the rest of us and started to cut in line in front of me. I hit the horn several times, and she persisted, almost taking the Harley rider out. Fortunately my horn got the Harley rider's attention, so he was able to get out of the way. BTW, he had a very faded orange vest on.

One last one. Other riders WILL SCREW YOU!!! I was getting onto the separate HOV/Motorcyle lanes here. The on ramp is downhill, speed limit is 65 mph. As I was getting on, I was getting my 696 up to speed as another rider was coming up. Instead of maintaining speed, she decided to speed up and match my pace so I couldn't merge. I ended up having to drop a gear and pass her as there were several cars right behind her. I had not had my bike up to 90 mph before, it was a very odd feeling.
 

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As a new rider, I've learned that with every twist of the throttle I become more and more of a pro. It can be very difficult to stay level headed, and not act like a bone head on the road. Especially when every teenager in his Pontiac Sunfire, or Chevy Cavlier wants to "race". It doesn't help that I'm only 29 years old, so they see me as one of "them".
 

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Here's one, and don't ask how I know: Avoid breaking hard on a street that a car wash exits onto. Notice how the pavement is stained a darker color? Even when it's dry, that stuff is slippery, and my (ex)bike & I have the rashes to prove it. :(
 

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Khocke...that is excellent !! After 30+ years of riding, that had never occurred to me. As I pass 3 car washes on my way to and from work every day, I shall be taking more notice in future.

Here's another one...trust your instincts.

Case in point only this morning. I was in the right lane on the freeway doing 120 kph. In the left lane there was a slow truck with 5-6 cars behind it. Warning, Will Robinson! One of those cars is going to switch to the right lane to get past the truck without checking mirrors! I slowed down, prepared for trouble. However, for some reason I focussed on one particular car, about third in line from the back of the truck. I kept watching that car and, sure enough, as I was just about level, on came its indicators and it instantly moved into my lane. No real drama - just a gentle squeeze on the front brake and a few angry chirps on the horn. I could tell by the old gent's reaction that he had not seen me and realised what he had done. I could also see that his wife was giving him curry. He pulled into the left lane after the truck and, as I passed him, he gave an apologetic wave and pulled a "sorry face". I raised my hand in acknowledgment and gave him a nod. No point in flipping the finger or shaking the fist - he already had the bejeesus frightened out of him and knew he was in the wrong. Besides, his wife was still biting his ears. I felt better for doing it that way too.

(to save any left/right lane confusion - we drive on the left)

But, after all that, my point is...sometimes the brain is receiving clues and processing the information subconsciously. I don't know how many times that my attention has been somehow drawn to one particular unremarkable car amongst many others, just before it put me at risk by doing something stupid/unexpected. I dunno what those clues may be: subtle changes in direction, movement of the drivers head, - whatever. But I trust implicitly that instinct when it says to watch that particular car very carefully. It has saved my bacon more times than I can count.
 

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I think you left much to share on bike tires as per your own experience. They should actually come first despite the fact that they do not contribute to the engine. They are a key component for any given bike..
 

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I know a few have mentioned never riding in the middle of the lane, sometimes the situations dictates it...it might be the best alternative at the time. If I'm at an intersection and I'm in the right lane with an option to turn right, I fill my lane so cars don't try to go around me...I have been brushed by someone before, I had left too much room on my right and they took it as they can "share" my lane!! Never again!! I usually plan not to be that a-hole that blocks the right lane if it has the turning option, I try to move into the next left,sometimes you can't plan it. Good points, keep them coming :)
 

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As a new rider, I've learned that with every twist of the throttle I become more and more of a pro. It can be very difficult to stay level headed, and not act like a bone head on the road. Especially when every teenager in his Pontiac Sunfire, or Chevy Cavlier wants to "race". It doesn't help that I'm only 29 years old, so they see me as one of "them".
Great point!! Even at 39, the fact that we ride bikes, we are all still young at heart, the urge to show someone or put them in their place can be there...curb it. It might save your life...like anything about living in the inner city!! sometimes walking away...in this case riding away is the better part of valour!! If I can add, assertiveness as a rider is very important, one can't be timid in traffic, defensive not aggressive!!!:)
 
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