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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Everyone.
I know this depends entirely on the person and how attached to the bike they are, but I wanted to get your thoughts anyway.
I just regoed my bike for a year and I've been given a 6 month work assignment overseas...what a bummer. Its a 2002 M900 and I haven't had any trouble with it for the last 7 months since I bought it, but just last week it appears the generator has died. It has 34000km and a few cosmetic blemishes, but was otherwise ok until now.
So...what do you think?
Sell it at a reduced price and get another one when I get back?
Or get it fixed and keep it stored in my garage until I'm back and hope other things don't start to fail?
I can do simple oil changes and brake pad stuff on my own, but I'd have to take it to someone for a job like the generator.
Cheers!
 

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This depends entirely on the person and how attached to the bike you are.

34K km is just about where the engine starts to settle in fully and run really well; by 50K km it's at its best.
I'd fix it and keep it if I was you. But then I'm that sort of person, and am very attached to my M900.

PhilB
 

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I agree with PhilB. If the cost to store the bike is significant and if the supply ride worthy Ducs are good where you live, sell it. If you and your bike are kindred souls, keep it.
 

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Are you sure it's not the voltage regulator/rectifier. It's an easy easy fix. You can direct swap the original rectifier in about 5 minutes or you can mount up a Mosfet FH012 or FH020 from Ebay with adapters for about $100.

I had to do this just yesterday to my Paul Smart. It had sat for about a year with a dead battery. I'm guessing they kept going dead as there was a direct short back to ground through the R/R. I put a new battery in the bike, went for a ride and you guessed it, 30 miles later I was screwed. I got the bike home, checked the R/R with a meter and found a short. Swapped it with my S4RS and voila' instant 14.4v at the battery again.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. Very helpful. My friend came over with a multi meter and narrowed it down to the connector from the generator to the rectifier. So it's likely the generator. I can't help but be a little hopeful it's just the connector, but I'm not sure if there is a way to test it closer to the gen.
 

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How did you test the RR? Just wondering. Generators rarely go bad, that's why I keep asking. Of course they can but really it's just a bunch of wires rolled up. Generally the flywheel has to come off and scrape the wires or if you have a shorted out RR it can then burn the generator.

I'm a huge fan of the M900 myself. I'd say keep it unless you have your eye on something different when you come home. I'd sell it for a 900SS pre '98, but that's just me. I'd think your bike could pull $3,000 to $4,000 and that can buy you something different when you get back. Toss in another $1,000 when you get home and you could certainly pick something else. I can't imagine you'd need more than about $500 to fix the issue. Pulling the cover is easy peasy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well I guess we never tested the RR after we put the multimeter on the generator side of the gen/RR connector. When that gave no juice, we figuered it must be the gen. This is clearly out of my realm of expertise. Hahaha.
Can anyone recommend a shop close enough to Manly NSW that I can get it to before the batt dies? It has a full charge currently. I know there are a few In the area, but maybe you have friends at one and I'm happy to give them the business.
 

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Don't count out doing the stator yourself. It is a pretty easy job on the monster.

Get a cheap cover pulling tool (make one, steering wheel puller can be made to work)
Drain oil
Remove the side cover (many allen bolts)
Remove stator (a few allen bolts) and a wire connector
Insert new stator
Clean case mating surfaces
Apply sealant
Replace case
Add new oil

You could knock it out in an hour, 2 if you really take your time. Keep track of the cover bolt locations since they are different lengths. I like to draw the shape of the case on cardboard and poke the bolts through where they sit on the case.
 
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