Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is it hard to drag your knee on stock rearsets? im on an 05 620
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
street, i havent been to the track, dont have the money and can't get a sponsor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,132 Posts
I have never dragged on the street, I have dragged on the track though. you dont need a sponsor to ride on a track, just do some track days, there are tons of them out there. I have never dragged on a Monster but I know that ground clearance is an issue. if you drag hard parts before you drag your knee it can be dangerous and cause you to crash, the point of putting your knee down is to use it as a guage as to how far over you are and how far you can go. I have found that most people who drag on the street (inexperianced) hang off the bike in an unsafe manner (hang off to much) you dont need to hang off much, one butt cheak usually, but most people who cant drag dont put their knee out far enough, be smooth in everything you do and always be light on the controls and your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,324 Posts
It is not difficult to drag a knee on a Monster with stock rearsets.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
430 Posts
greasacati said:
is it hard to drag your knee on stock rearsets? im on an 05 620
I think it was Lee Parks who mentioned in his book that he learned to drag his knees in an empty parking lot.
Make sure there are no oil slicks ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
it was lee parks who said that, i swear i read his book everytime im on the shitter, and i can honestly say that my riding has improved ten fold just from me pooping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,132 Posts
greasacati said:
it was lee parks who said that, i swear i read his book everytime im on the shitter, and i can honestly say that my riding has improved ten fold just from me pooping.
not to mention your increased horsepower to weight ratio [cheeky]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
I would highly recommend doing at least one track day. it was the best thing I have done for myself in terms of riding technique since taking an MSF class. I'll help break down the costs.

  • NESBA registration and Event Registration - $220
  • Trailer Rental (2days) - $50
  • Hotel (1 night) - $65
  • Trailer hitch w/wiring harness for the Subaru (I'll use it again) - $200

Full total - $535
Minus Amoratizeable Item (those which will be resued) - $ 265

I haven't included food or anything and these are just round numbers. I would get prepped up now for the spring if you're near a track.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
430 Posts
chipazzo said:
I would highly recommend doing at least one track day. it was the best thing I have done for myself in terms of riding technique since taking an MSF class. I'll help break down the costs.

  • NESBA registration and Event Registration - $220
  • Trailer Rental (2days) - $50
  • Hotel (1 night) - $65
  • Trailer hitch w/wiring harness for the Subaru (I'll use it again) - $200

Full total - $535
Minus Amoratizeable Item (those which will be resued) - $ 265

I haven't included food or anything and these are just round numbers. I would get prepped up now for the spring if you're near a track.
Sorry to go off topic, but ...
I am very much interested in doing some track days. Few questions:

x Why did you rent a trailer instead of riding your bike there?
x Did you replace the tires for the tracks?
x What size trailer did you rent, and how many bikes?
x I have a Lexus SUV, but never pulled any trailer in my life. Is it difficult to drive i.e. back-in to a parking lot etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,755 Posts
stik said:
Sorry to go off topic, but ...
I am very much interested in doing some track days. Few questions:

x Why did you rent a trailer instead of riding your bike there?
x Did you replace the tires for the tracks?
x What size trailer did you rent, and how many bikes?
x I have a Lexus SUV, but never pulled any trailer in my life. Is it difficult to drive i.e. back-in to a parking lot etc?
You rent a trailer because:
1. you can prep the bike the day before rather than at the track
2. you can carry tools different clothes and other stuff to help make sure you're able to ride all day
3. you can carry extra gas
4. you'll be prett tired after a day on the track and riding home's not the best idea
5. juuuust in case you have a little crash, you'll be able to get you and your bike home

I've never put on new tires just for the track, but I make sure the ones I have are in really good shape.
I rented a U-Haul 9x12 which comfortably held two bikes, gas cans etc. U-haul also has a nice single bike trailer.
Backing a trailer only takes a little bit of practice if you get the concept. An open trailer is easiest due to the visibility. If you were to rent a box trailer, there might be a longer learning curve.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,484 Posts
stik said:
Sorry to go off topic, but ...
I am very much interested in doing some track days. Few questions:

x Why did you rent a trailer instead of riding your bike there?
x Did you replace the tires for the tracks?
x What size trailer did you rent, and how many bikes?
x I have a Lexus SUV, but never pulled any trailer in my life. Is it difficult to drive i.e. back-in to a parking lot etc?
I wouldn't ride to a track day for all the reasons Don explained. You have NO idea how tired you'll be at the end of it. Exhausted. It's just not safe to ride home. And if you bin at the track . . .

When I've run street tires on the track (only my first half dozen or so track days), I've make sure my tires are in really good shape (i.e. new or newish). This is not an area to push the limits. Because you'll be asking more of your tires on the track than you ever would on the street, trying to push some more life out of a set of tires is gonna end up costing your a TON more $ in crash repairs than if you just replaced 'em.

I've always rented or borrowed a truck or van or hitched a ride on someone else's trailer, so I can't help you with trailers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,324 Posts
stik said:
Sorry to go off topic, but ...
I am very much interested in doing some track days. Few questions:

x Why did you rent a trailer instead of riding your bike there?
x Did you replace the tires for the tracks?
x What size trailer did you rent, and how many bikes?
x I have a Lexus SUV, but never pulled any trailer in my life. Is it difficult to drive i.e. back-in to a parking lot etc?
I used to ride to the track all the time. I couldn't afford a vehicle that would haul a trailer. I have a pick-up now, and it's so much easier. BTW, the first time I used the pick-up to haul the bike I crashed. I'm not sure if there is a correlation there. :-\ [laugh]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,906 Posts
+1 on all the reasons not to ride to a trackday. You can rent a cargo van from Enterprise for hauling the bike too, if you have a small car like I do.

Back to the original topic - just note that it is easier to drag a sidestand nub or stock exhaust than it is to drag a knee...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
430 Posts
Michael Moore said:
Back to the original topic - just note that it is easier to drag a sidestand nub or stock exhaust than it is to drag a knee...
Apparently, if you have short legs, it is even more difficult ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,283 Posts
on street no probs, on track will find out in a few weeks! it's all about riding position on the bike but don't get obsessed by it. it'll come naturally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
911 Posts
Dragging knees on my stock S4R rearsets at the track is not difficult. The fact that you're shifting your weight to the inside will help you avoid dragging any hard parts. That said, you do have to make an effort to shift your body off the seat, or it won't happen (unless you have realllly long legs).

Lester
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
499 Posts
You have to work on your lean angle,before you knee drag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
drivetrane said:
You have to work on your lean angle,before you knee drag.
Read this whole thread and was about to make the point you just did. It's not how perfectly you hang off; it's a matter of lean angle. I learned to drag my knee when I learned to get comfortable at full lean; meaning I was smooth in and out of the turns and trusted my tires and suspension enough that I could use my attention on riding the bike in a relaxed manner at those lean angles. If you do that, your knee will simply wind up on the deck; you won't even have to try. Just make sure you wait until your tire comes in and then just get that bike over on its side.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
71 Posts
IMO, if you're dragging a knee on the street, you're riding too fast for the street. Take it to the track where it's safer and where you have fewer outside "concerns" to deal with (ie: debris, oil, potholes, cars busting the double yellow, traffic, the wife banging you on the back of the helmet to slow down, etc.)
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top